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kopal 1adj Thick, as the two sides of a book, a piece of clothing, or paper. Makopal ka kinabò. The shirt is thick. ant: manipis. 2adj Thick, as hair when there is a lot of it. Makopal ka bulbul. Oglituk to dakol lagboy ka bulbul din woy malapung His/her hair is thick. It means that he has a lot of hair and plentiful. 3adj Having a small amount of liquid so that many particles are close together such as a lot of powdered milk added to a small amount of water. Makopal ka gatas su og-anlod ka gatas ko ogtunawon to woig. The milk is thick because the milk sinks to the bottom if it is dissolved/suspended in water. 4adj Close together as forest where are many trees and much vegetation. Makopal ka mgo tibogow diò to napù no mabasag ka lawa rin. [The tibogow is dense there in the flat area and its body is hard.] ant: magalat; see: sokol. 5adj To be volumic, that is, both wide and have much content, as as a field with much vegetation. Makopal ka tira-an. Maluag, mgo lalimma no hitaria bua to ogpamula-an. Sikan dò ka impamula; warò solug no duma. The sugarcane field is capacious. It is wide, about five hetares maybe which has been planted. That is all that has been planted; there is no mixture of anything else. 6adj Many such as flies or lice which which cover a sore. Makopal to kutu. Ogkito-on ka kutu woy ogkogangon ka batò. The lice are many. The lice are visible and the child is covered with sores. Makopal ka langow no oghulun to pa-a. The flies are thick which are swarming on [a someone’s] foot. see: moon-ing. 7adv Thicker [than something else]; thickest Mamakopal ka laplap to kalabow. The carabao's skin is thicker [than the shirt]. 8deriv n thickness Ko og-otian ka nigsamba no woig, songo dangow ka kapokali to danlak. When the flooded [river] water has receeded, the thickness of the silt is a handspan deep.

agpu-unan 1n To be afflicted by an illness believed to be a result of meeting a long-haired spirit while bathing in a river or stream. Ko du-on batò no ogdaralu no ungod ogparigus, ogkagi ka mgo buyag to na-agpu-unan su nalimuan to gamowgamow. If a child gets sick who is always bathing [in the river], the older people say that he afflicted by an evil spirit because he affected by a long-haired spirit [which lives in the water]. [Wherever the swelling is on a body of the child, the people believe that is where the hair of the spirit wrapped around the child’s body.] see fr.: gamowgamow; see: limuan; see fr.: limuan; see: gamowgamow. 2v To become ill from contact with a female spirit with long hair which lives near a stream or river. Ko duon ogdaralu no mgo batò no malasi ogpamarigus diò to woig, kagi to amoy, “Pitow ka. Na-agpu-unan ka.” If there are children who become ill who are often bathing in the river (lit. water), the father says, “See. You have become ill from a spirit source.” Ko du-on batò no ogdaralu no ungod ogparigus, ogkagi ka mgo buyag to na-agpu-unan su nalimuan to gamowgamow. If a child gets sick who is always bathing [in the river], the older people say that he afflicted by an evil spirit because he was affected by a long-haired spirit [which lives in the water]. [They believe that there is a female spirit with long hair called a gamowgamow who lives in the water. They believe that if an adult or child gets tangled in her hair while bathing, it will cause them to be ill. They also believe that unless a special spirit ceremony is performed to remove this illness, the person may die. They believe a withered calf is one form of this illness but any illness following bathing is suspect.] see: limuan; see: gamowgamow.

amana adv 1Enough; too much, to have had it [with someone for some reason], my goodness; not fair “Amana so goinawa nu no ma-agkap.” “Can’t you get just a little angry?” Amana so-ini no batò no ungod ogsinogow no ma-agol so bo-bò. [I've] had it with this child who is always crying who has a hollowed-out mouth! Amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init. My goodness that you have been traveling in the sun when it is excessively hot. (meaning: [You] shouldn't be traveling in the sun.) [used to express frustration, irritation or surprise about something or someone. Some idiomatic English expressions connote similar iconcepts in the following examples:] 2With negative: [not] quite, [not] so much Ka abu-on, ogko-iling to kolor no abug. Konò amana no maputì; ogsolug. [The color of the abu-on bird resembles the color of ashes. It isn't quite white; it's [color] is mixed. 3An exclamation indicating surprise, sometimes with a hint of disapproval. The meaning is similar to the English expression, “goodness gracious”. Amana so goinawa nu no ma-agkap! How can you be so calm! Amana so-ini no batò no ungod ogsinogow no ma-agol so bo-bò. Goodness gracious this child who is always crying whose mouth is a cavern (lit. hollow)! Amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init Goodness gracious that you travelled in the sunshine when it is exceedingly hot! [The following was the surprised response of a neighbor who wondered how someone could stay peaceful/calm when being threatened. There is also a hint that the speaker wishes he would at least get a little upset.] 4Idiom similar to English, “Bless your heart”, or “You poor thing”. Amana-amana ka bag no sasampoton koddì. Bless your heart for feeling lonely for me.

balow v 1To welcome and gather information from a guest. Ka tagbanua, nig-agpas no nigtagbu to magaliug no nigdatong to baloy rin. No nigbalowbalow ka nigpanangnangonoy. The host hurried to meet the guest who arrived at his house and he welcomed and gathered information [from him] as they talked with one another. [which includes the initial gathering of information when a visitor first arrives such as finding out a person's name, where he/she has come from, whether he/she eaten, etc. Unless the guest is in a hurry, further discussion (alukuyon) about the purpose of the guest's visit will wait until after a meal has been served and eaten.] 2Repair, change, amend, redo.

balungkag 1n The long hair at the back of the neck. Ko du-on ka malayat bulbul to tongol to otow, ogngaranan to balungkag to babuy. Ka lituk, ogpoko-utol to babuy no magintalunan. Ka dangob no lituk to sikan, ogsu-ut to babuy. If a person has [some strands of] long hair at the base of the neck, it is called the balungkag of the pig The meaning is that he will be able to get a wild pig. The other meaning is that he resembles a pig. [especially of a pig or goat] 2n A necklace or belt made with beads sewn or woven into hair. [This may be a chain-like necklace of human or animal hair but is often made from hair of a horse's talil.; May be made into a necklace or belt.] see: bagakis; see: siapid. 3v Have hair standing on end, as of pig or cat.

banggas n A fern-like plant which has hairy body and stems. [Could be used as a decortive plant.]