Search results for "Liboganon"

bunow n 1Yolk of egg. 2A tree which has a hard, green and white trunk and has edible small oval, yellow fruits similar to lansones. but about the size of the santol fruit. 3Name of a deep pool and village on the Liboganon river between Langan and Patil which are named after a bubunow tree growing there.

Magimon deriv.: gimon. n Name of a river north of Mansalinow which flows into the Liboganon River - also a village at the river junction. [Name was said to derive from people met long ago who were always smiling.]

dakol phr.: Dakol ka goinawa; phr.: ian dakol. 1adj Big; large in size. Ka abu-on, dakol no manukmanuk no og-ugpò to koilawan. A heron is a big bird which lives in the forest. see fr.: pagamayan. 2adj A lot, or large amount of something Dakol ka hilamonon to homoy ni Inò Mother has a lot of weeds in her rice [field]. 2.1adj many Ko dakol ka igko-untud to gakit, ogka-agod-od on. If many [people] get on a raft, it will become submerged. 2.2adj lot, or large amount of something. Ko dakol ka urang, ogkaponù ka luang to balutu. If there is a lot of rain, the interior of the boat will become full [of water]. 3adv Profuse. Dakol ka pogpasalamat ku ki Joaquin ka nigpangabangan a rin. My expressions of thanks to Joaquin were profuse for his having saved me. [DB says he would have expressed his thanks in words -- it implies many but also includes the emotion of joy.] 4adv Very much. Ka bogas to katumbal, dakol no ogpakabulig ko du-on turakan ta no agoloy no ogtasikan. [As for] the fruit of the red pepper, it helps very much if we have a corn field which has a tasikan blight/disease. see: lagboy 1. 5adj Forceful. No ko oghulid sikandan, ogdagsangan to dakol no lugung woy kilat. And then when they laid down next to each other [to sleep], they were struck by a forceful [clap] of thunder and lightning. see: agbot 2. 6v To increase, do something in greater measure; excessively. Ognangonan ta ka magaliug ta to, “Pango-on ka; hinalatoy ka,” oyow ogdakol ka ogko-onon din. We tell our guest, “Eat up; fill up”, so that he will eat more (lit. increase his eating). Nigdakol ka uran gabi-i su napawa-an no warò pad nigtilo-tò. It rained excessively yesterday because [it rained] all night until morning without stopping. 7v To increase Ogdakolon ta ka homoy to og-angoy diò to pinayag su ogka-atangan ki to oglanog ka Liboganon. We will increase [the amount of] rice which we fetch from the rice shelter because we will be blocked by the swollen Liboganon [river]. 8v To do something in great measure, such as to give a large amount of something. Bogayi nu si Tunin to homoy woy dakola nu to ogbogoy. Give Tunin some rice and give her a large amount [of rice]. see: timul. 9adj very large Ka ogbobol-og, ogpamusil to babuy no magintalunan, usa, ubal, ko manukmanuk no dagdakol. Those who go hunting with a weapon, they shoot wild pigs, deer, monkey(s), or very large birds. 10adj Forceful, very heavy (lit. very big), as rain Wà dò malugoy, nigdagsang ka ma-agbot no kilat woy lugung woy daddakol no uran. Not long later, a loud crack of lightning and thunder struck along with very heavy (lit. very big) rain. 11adj Very big; biggest Ka takubung, ngaran to ambow no daddakol no lukosan. Takubung is the name of the biggest of the male rodents. 12adj Bigger Dakoldakol ka lumansad no kalusisi to boian. The male love bird is bigger than the female. 13v Increase see: timul. 14Bigger, biggest, larger, largest. 15n Size, measurement Nigsokoran ku ka hawak to batò oyow ogkatagaan ku ka karakoli to hawak din. I measured the child's waist so that I would know the measurement of her waist. 16v To exalt, oneself or someone else. Maro-ot sikandin no ogpakabulig no igparakol ka batasan din. Maroyow poron ko duma no mgo otow ka ogparakol to ngaran din. That person is bad who has helped and then uses it to exalt his own conduct. It would be good if someone else was the one to exalt his name. 17To exalt oneself Ko ogparakoldakol ki to duma ta, sikan dod, songo og-ampow-ampow ki to duma ta. Ogdo-isokon ta ka duma ta. If we exalt ourselves over our companions, that is also, the same as making ourselves higher than our companions.

lawang 1v To go down a creek to a river junction. Ko oglaras ki to bo-ogan, oglawang ki to tugda-an no oglapas ki to Liboganan. When we go down a creek [either by foot or by raft], we reach/end up at the river junction and then we cross over the Liboganon [River]. [The underlying meaning of lawang seems to be for two things to come together. In the first example the meaning includes travel to the tugda-an “junction” where the creek comes together with the river. (DB says that one doesn't use the term lawang for crossing a river unless ogdakol ka woig “the water is high”.)] 2v To break through, as of the space between two fields. Di ka olatan dan, warò dan poglawang to pogkamot. Warò dan pogtomua to pogkamot. But in cutting, they have not broken through the space between them. They have not joined the two fields by cutting. [When people make fields side by side, they often do not clear the space between them so the two fields will not be joined. The purpose is to prevent the fire of one field from burning into the other if one person burns first.] see: lagbas. 3join Ko nigkamot ka diò limang to bubungan no nakagomow kad diò to songo du-on kamot, nokoglawang ka to olin kamot. Nokogtomu on. If you cut a field on one side of a mountain and happened to go over the summit to another person who had a field, you would have joined the two fields. They would have come together. see: tomu 1. 4v To have network of connections Ka mgo lugì to tabunan to takubung, ogpoglawanglawangon diò to diralom to oghimuan dan to salag. The holes of the marmot’s mound is connected underneath to the places where they make their nests. [This contrasts with the above example of the fields being joined because the fields do not have a network of connections between them.] see: sumpul. 5v To pass through, or cross over to the other side, as of a river. Ko niglanog ka Liboganon, oglawangon ta rò to oglapas to woig to ogpangali to mundù. When the Liboganon River floods, we just pass through it to cross to the other side of the river to dig camotes. Usì, maniò to nakalawang ka to dakol ka lanog? Friend why did you have to cross over [the river] when the flooding was excessive? Ogpakalawang ka to sikan no woig ko ogbayò ka to tulay. You cross over that river when you pass across a bridge. [One can cross a swollen river by wading, swimming or using some conveyance. The sense is that one traverses and comes out on the other side.] 6v To cross over each other as bridges of highways that pass over each other. Ogpokoglawanglawan ka mgo tulay to mgo kalasara. The bridges of the highways cross over each other.
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