Search results for "Pig."

bakit 1v Castrate. [Ata Manobo people usually castrate only pigs or dogs. They usually want to use their larger animals to produce offspring as this generates income.] 2deriv n Neutered, as pig.

baloy deriv. of: babaloy, og=, nig=. 1n House, building. spec: bakalag, pinayag 1. 2deriv n Household. Agad hontow ka ogpoko-ugpò to kandin no baloy, songo balayan on. Whoever lives at his/her house, [they are] one household. 3deriv v Domesticated, as a pig in the village in contrast to magintalunan which would refer to a wild pig. 4deriv n Old house; one that is becoming old. Ogkabinalayan on ka baloy. The house is getting old. 5deriv n Home owner including family members but not guests; master of household. see: tagbanwa. 6deriv n A request on the basis of a relationship as that of being a neighbor or friend who has previously done a favor for the person from whom the request is made. Tagibaloy to nasagman a nu rò su si Unisimu ka oghinguma on diò to baloy nu. ??? that you just showed hospitality to me because Onisimus is the one who arrived at your house. Tagibaloy (unawa ??) to nigsagman si [Pablo] ko nigdatong [si Unisimu] diò to baloy ni Pilimun su ligkat diò ki Pablo ka pogtokod din. It was like [Paul] was welcomed when Onisimus arrived at the house [of Philemon] because his acknowledgement [of Onisimus] came from [his relationship with] Paul. [DB comment regarding what Paul had proposed to Philemon regarding receiving Onisimus in his stead.]

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

balungkag 1n The long hair at the back of the neck. Ko du-on ka malayat bulbul to tongol to otow, ogngaranan to balungkag to babuy. Ka lituk, ogpoko-utol to babuy no magintalunan. Ka dangob no lituk to sikan, ogsu-ut to babuy. If a person has [some strands of] long hair at the base of the neck, it is called the balungkag of the pig The meaning is that he will be able to get a wild pig. The other meaning is that he resembles a pig. [especially of a pig or goat] 2n A necklace or belt made with beads sewn or woven into hair. [This may be a chain-like necklace of human or animal hair but is often made from hair of a horse's talil.; May be made into a necklace or belt.] see: bagakis; see: siapid. 3v Have hair standing on end, as of pig or cat.

dalangin 1vt To run an errand find out something, such as whether one can buy newly butchered meat. Ko du-on og-iow to babuy, kalabow, kuddò ogsugù koy to, "Dalangin kow su du-on nangiow to babuy. Purut kow to agad songo kilo." If someone is butchering a pig, water buffalo, [or] horse, we will command someone, “Go check it out because someone has butchered a pig. Get even one kilo.” see: lo-uy 2; see: ma-an 2. 2vi To be en route to go to a destination as an evil spirit which is en route to check out a dead person. Konò kow amana ogli-ag diò to tanò su ogkabaya-an kow to busow no ogdalangin to namatoy. Don't play so much outside (lit. on the ground) because you will happen to be in the path of evil spirit(s) which are en route to check out a dead person. 3v [For many people] to check something out Ko du-on og-iow, moon-ing ka oghondu-on ka ogdalanginan. If there is [an animal] being butchered, many go to check it out. 4v To delegate someone to do something. Kunto-on, to warò liwak nu to oghondiò to Malaybalay, nigdalanginan ta si Jaimi su du-on tu-ud din diò to Malaybalay no ian ta pinaboli to mgo gulayon. Today, since you didn’t have time to go to Malaybalay, we delegated Jaimi to do it [for us] because he had a purpose in Malaybalay and so we had him buy the food items. see: pagindalan; see: saligan. 5v To be pursued, as by evil spirits who want the game that a person is carrying. Ogdanginan ka otow to busow no ogbababa to babuy su ogngarog to langosa. A person who is carrying a pig on his back will be pursued by an evil spirit because it smells the blood. [Said to happen if one is carrying a pig after dark or when the light outside is dim because the spirit(s) are after the blood of the animal because it wants to take the animal away from the person. It is believed that the enounter may result in that person becoming ill.]