Search results for "Something."

sagman phr.: konò ogsagman. v 1To pay attention to something or someone. Sagmana nu ka batò no og-a-ambò to bintana no ogko-ulug on angkuan. Pay attention to the child who is leaning [out of] the window who will fall after a while. ant: mata 5; see fr.: anam. 2To make a visitor feel welcome by attending to their needs. [These two meanings are not totally different because the way one makes a guest feel welcome is to pay attention to them. By contrast, if one ignores a guest, it is not only impolite but communicates that they are not welcome and they may leave.]

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

agap 1v To race, involving just two people. Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Two people will race [each other] to return home. Nig-a-agap ka darua. The two people were racing [each other]. 2v To race one another, esp. of three or more people. Ka sikan no ogpa-ag-agapoy, li-agan. Ogtagù to saku no ogpallaguy. Ka ogpakaponga, ian ogpakaro-og. That [word] race each other is a game. They get in sacks and run. The one who is able to finish [first] is the one who wins. Ogpa-ag-agapoy ka mgo kuddò. The horses are racing each other. [such as in a game with multiple participants or when racing horses.] 3v To chase and catch up with someone or something. Ko du-on darua no ogpalawod no ka sagboka oghun-a, og-agapan ka oghun-a. If two [people] are going downriver [by raft/canoe] and one gets ahead, the other will chase and catch up with the one which got ahead. [The term agapan “catch up” includes the components of the words gapun “chase” and ogko-umaan “overtake”.] osyn: liu 1. 4vs To be overtaken and passed so that the other person will reach a destination ahead of him/her; beaten to a destination. Ko du-on taga Maguimon no ogligkat to Patil di nig-ulì on sikandan, no du-on nasinundul no og-ulì diò to Maambago, kagi sikandin to, “Ogka-agapan ka Usì.” Ogtabak ka taga Maguimon to, “Balagad. Hun-a ka rò du-on.” If there is someone from Maguimon who is leaving from Patil but he has left to return home, and there are others who have followed later who are returning to Maambago, they will say, “Usì, you will be inadvertently passed up.” The person from Maguimon will answer, “Nevermind. You just go on ahead.” Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Kagi to sagboka, “Ko ogka-agapan ka, koykow ka ogsakaru. Two were racing to return to the house. One said, “If you happen to be beaten [to the destination], you will be the one to fetch water.”

akob 1n A layer of something, such as an additional layer of clothing like an undergarment, underskirt or slip or an upper garment such as a shawl or coat.. [Almost anything which can be layered, such as a layer of paint or a layer of wood.] see fr.: laplap 2; see: linas. 2v To be layered, as plywood. [This applies to thin layers or items such as plywood, paper or paint and would not be used of thicker items such as books or boards which would be stacked. It could also apply to layers of skin or leaves on the ground.] 3v To be multi-layered or stacked as many sheets of paper. [But not stacked as books. That would be ogpokog-ampow-ampow.] 4vs (Fig) To have one's thoughts or activities supplanted, or overlaid, or taken over by something. Ko pananglitan du-on oghimuon ta di ko du-on igkasasow ta, na-akoban ka oghimuon ta porom no an-anayan. If for example we are doing something but then something is worrying us, what we had been doing at first was supplanted [by that which is disturbing us]. Na-akoban ka doromdom ta to igkasasow ta no warò ta nato-ori to oghimuon ta porom. Our thinking was taken over by that which was worrying us and so we didn't accomplish what we would have done. [The following is an example of having one's thoughts so much supplanted or taken over (lit. overlaid) by something else that one cannot concentrate on what one had originally planned to do.] see: aloy 2.

anad 1v Teach. Ka maistra, og-anad to mgo istudianti. [As for] the teacher, he/she teaches the students. see fr.: ayat 2. 1.1v Taught Ka maistra ku to "grade one", sikan dod ka nig-anad ki Judith. My grade one teacher was also the one who taught Judith. 1.2vt To be taught by someone. Og-anaron ka mgo batò oyow du-on ogkato-uanan dan. The children are being taught so that they will have skills. 2v To be able to teach. Warò a nig-iman-iman to ogka-anad ku ka amoy woy ka anak. I had not expected that I would be able to teach the father and the daughter (lit. offspring). 2.1v To train or submit oneself to training (lit. allow oneself to be taught). Ka sikan no ogpo-omot to pa-anad, ogkato-u sikandin. That person who diligently trains (lit. causes [himself] to be taught) will become skilled. 2.2v That which is used to teach/train others. Ko nato-uan din, songo ig-anad din to songo otow. When he has become skilled, he will likewise use [that skill] to teach another person. 2.2.1v That which was taught, or used to train someone. Ogkaroromdom ku ka in-anad to amoy ku kanak tongod to talabau to oggabas to kayu no ighimu to baloy I remember that which my father taught me about the work of sawing wood to make a house. 3v Learn. Ka mgo batò, og-anad to ogsulat. The children are learning to write. 3.1vs To learn, become accustomed to. Kanokal ka to oghusud oyow ogka-anad ka oyow du-on ogkato-uan nu to oggabas. Be strong to pull [on the saw] so that you will learn so that you will know how to saw. 4v That which would be used to teach/train someone to do something. 5vs To have learned or to have become trained, accustomed to. Ko na-anad ka, du-on dayagang nu woy malomu nu su nigtagama nu. When you have become trained, you have strength and it is easy for you because you have become accustomed [to the work]. Warò koy na-anad to sikan no du-on ngalap. Na-anad koy to warò ngangalapoy noy. We are not accustomed to those kinds of fish [lit. viand]. We are accustomed to having no [means of catching] fish. see: tagam. 6v 7deriv n Teacher or the ones who teach. Ka maistra woy ka maistru, sikandan ka talag-anad to mgo istudianti. The male-teacher and female teacher(s), they are the teachers of the students [In the school context, the Spanish borrowings maistru and maistra are commonly used for “teacher” but talag-anad is still used for those who teach how to do anything.] 8Learn. 9v To enable someone gain the ability (lit. to learn) to do something such as to regain a skill that has been lost due to illness. Ogbuligan ta ka otow no malotoy to ogkitkit oyow ogpaka-anad to oghihipanow oyow ogpoko-orol on. We help a weak person by holding [his/her] hand so that [he/she] will gain the ability to walk so that [he/she] will be able to become ambulatory.

angkoy 1v To prop something up, such as to rest one’s elbow and arm on a companion’s shoulder, or prop one\\\\\\\'s feet up on something 2n Something which is used to prop up something. [When a body is sabal laid “in state” such as in a house-like structure, DB says that the body is laid on a piece of wood to prop it up.] 3deriv n A prop or resting place for something else. 4phrase A footstool. Ankayanan to pa-a. [It's] a resting place for feet.

balò 1n A prediction based on some procedure or ceremony. Ka poghusud to natampod no songo banoy no bulu ko naponù to tanò, maroyow ka balò din su ogtuga ka homoy. When the single length of bamboo is pulled up, if it is full of earth, its sign is good because the rice will be plentiful. [Some predictions as from a test of the soil are not considered to be associated with sympathetic magic. However, predictions made in conjunction with ceremonies or sacrifices or the call of the omen bird are associated with traditional beliefs and involvement with the spirit world.] 2n With negative: Bad sign, as of bad luck Ogkagi to buyag, “Purut ka to manuk no igkuyab nu ig-awò to maro-ot no balò nu.” The older person will say, “Get a chicken to waver to remove your bad luck.” [especially that based on sympathetic magic] see: pamalii. 3v To use divination to determine the outcome or value of something. Ka mgo buyag, ogpanlo-uy to matosan no latì, no ogbabalo-an pad ko maroyow ka tanò no ogkamotan. The older people go out to a field of matured secondary growth and have a ceremony to determine whether it would be good to cut the growth on that piece of ground [for a field]. [It is based on sympathetic magic which may take various forms which are used by the Ata Manobo people to determine whether or not to cut a certain field. One method is to cut a piece of rattan the length of their cutting knife and then cut it again into lengths of the width of that same knife. From the pieces, they make a diagram on the ground of a rice house. If the pieces build a complete diagram with a ladder and an extra piece to fit in one of the rooms, the sign is good and they will cut that plot. However, if it comes out short, tor they have a tiny piece left over, they will not cut that field because they determine that the land will not produce a good crop. If there is a futhur extra long piece, it is put on the opposite end of the diagram which resembles a casket. Then they will not cut the field because they believe someone will die.] 4v To use something as a means to predict an outcome (??) 5v To have a resemblance to something Nabala-an to pogul su pogulon. He has a resemblance pogul wood because he’s lazy. [The following statement also seems to imply that that the lazy person was “destined” to be lazy. It is an insult by a parent who is angry because of the conduct.] 6v To treat by using sympathetic magic to bring about a desired result such as to rub bodies of an agressive wasp on a horse’s lips to make the horse agressive for a horse fight. Ka kuddò no nabalangitan, ogkabala-an to mgo ulod-ulod no songo ogmabulut. The horse which is being treated, [with something to make him fierce], he becomes like the creatures which are likewise fierce. 7deriv n Kind of bushy weed with long leaves which are tipped with red which could be used as a decorative plant.