Search results for "When we die, our possessions are simply left behind and cannot be taken where we will be after we die."

galat₁ 1adj Wide-spread, far apart. Du-on batò no magalat ka ngipon din. Ka ngipon din, du-on olatan no ma-awang. There is a child whose teeth are far apart. His teeth have open spaces between them. [Does not mean loose as an item of clothing that is too big.] see fr.: tago-urò. 1.1adj Loosely woven, not close together Ko oghimu ka to bogyas, magalat. Magalat ka lawa to bogyas; magalat ka galow. When you make a fish trap, it is loosely woven. The body of the fishtrap is loosely woven and the prongs are also far apart. [Fish traps, nets and screen are all magalat because there is space between the strands of rattan, nylon or wire. These items are built strongly, the pieces intertwined but not solid.] 2v To leave behind in someone's care, esp. of a child Ko oglo-ug ka inoy to batò no oghilamon, ipagalat din ka anak din diò to songo otow no ian ka ogtamong. When the mother of a child goes to weed [her field], she leaves her child in the care of someone else and that person watches over him/her. 3v To take care of someone left behind Si Taganay ka niggalatan to anak ni Lita. Taganay is the one who took care of Lita's children who were left behind. 4v To leave something behind for someone, such as food for a child Ka inoy, oggalatan to homoy no igpalugaw no igpako-on to anak din. A mother leaves rice behind for gruel to be fed to her child. 5vs To leave behind (involuntarily) Ko ogkamatoy ki, ka mgo kalaglagan ta ogkaggalat dò no konò ta ogka-alap diò to kamatayon. When we die, our possessions are simply left behind and cannot be taken where we will be after we die.