Search results for "Whose"

bulan 1n Moon. Ka bulan, ogsilò ko marusilom. The moon rises at night. 2n Month. 3n Time when the moon is shining brightly. 4v To be two or three months in some location. 5n A person whose familiar spirit comes to him when the moon is shining. Ka bulbulanon, woy rò ogko-umoi to bantoy rin ko ogsilò ka bulan. As for the person whose familiar spirit comes when the moon is shining, his familiar spirit only comes to him when the moon comes up (lit. before his spirit will arrive is when the moon comes up). 6n Anyone who is paid by the month such as a housegirl or other worker. 7v To work by the month. 8v To walk or travel by moonlight. 9v For the moon to be shining. 9.1n Round raised area on front of the kalasag “shield” (kalasag) on which something white (or light colored) is placed so that it will be bright when the moon shines. see: kalasag 1. 10deriv n Name of a plant which has white flowers (or leaves), which glow in the dark. Ka kayu no ogngaran to bulanbulan, og-anamag ka bulak din ko mausilom on. As for he tree (plant) which is called bulanbulan, it has flowers which glow when it is already night. [What are called flowers may actually be leaves. The Ata Manobo people say that during the war, soldiers sometimes pinned these luminous leaves to their uniforms so they could see each other at night but sometimes their enemies could also see them and it resulted in some being shot.] 11n Kind of white rice.

amana adv 1Enough; too much, to have had it [with someone for some reason], my goodness; not fair “Amana so goinawa nu no ma-agkap.” “Can’t you get just a little angry?” Amana so-ini no batò no ungod ogsinogow no ma-agol so bo-bò. [I've] had it with this child who is always crying who has a hollowed-out mouth! Amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init. My goodness that you have been traveling in the sun when it is excessively hot. (meaning: [You] shouldn't be traveling in the sun.) [used to express frustration, irritation or surprise about something or someone. Some idiomatic English expressions connote similar iconcepts in the following examples:] 2With negative: [not] quite, [not] so much Ka abu-on, ogko-iling to kolor no abug. Konò amana no maputì; ogsolug. [The color of the abu-on bird resembles the color of ashes. It isn't quite white; it's [color] is mixed. 3An exclamation indicating surprise, sometimes with a hint of disapproval. The meaning is similar to the English expression, “goodness gracious”. Amana so goinawa nu no ma-agkap! How can you be so calm! Amana so-ini no batò no ungod ogsinogow no ma-agol so bo-bò. Goodness gracious this child who is always crying whose mouth is a cavern (lit. hollow)! Amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init Goodness gracious that you travelled in the sunshine when it is exceedingly hot! [The following was the surprised response of a neighbor who wondered how someone could stay peaceful/calm when being threatened. There is also a hint that the speaker wishes he would at least get a little upset.] 4Idiom similar to English, “Bless your heart”, or “You poor thing”. Amana-amana ka bag no sasampoton koddì. Bless your heart for feeling lonely for me.

awang phr.: ogma-awang to goinawa. 1adj Light, as that of a lamp, or sun. Ka goinawa ran, ogpoko-uma sikandan to ma-awang pad. . It was their desire (lit. breath) to arrive while it was still light. Ko du-on manggad no manipis, mo-ilag ka pogpitow ta su oglagbas ka ma-awang. If there is thin materials, it is show-through because light goes through it. Ka allow, ogbogoy to layag to ma-awang. As for the sun, it produces (lit. gives) rays of light. see fr.: ilag 2; osyn: ting-ow 1, ilag 1; see fr.: ilag 3. 1.1phrase To be free of apprehension; peaceful. With negative, to be unpeaceful. Ka sikan no ma-agkap so goinawa ta, ogkalituk to, ma-awang ka goinawa ta. Ogpakasalig ki kandin. When we feel OK about something (lit. as for our breath which is light-weight), it means that we are free of apprehension (lit. our breath is clear). Ka sikan no ogka-aras, lagboy no konò ogma-awang ka goinawa rin. As for that being frustrated, she was definitely not at peace (lit. her breath was especially not clear/peaceful). 1.2v To be clear, sediment free. Ka woig no mating-ow, mo-ilag dod. Ka mating-ow woy ka ma-awang, warò ogpaka-atang. Water which is sediment free, is also transparent. That which is sediment free and that which is clear have nothing obstructing the light. 1.3adj (Fig) Clear, as of understanding, comprehension. Ogmataloytoy, matul-id woy ma-awang ka pogsabut ta. The meaning is uncluttered, straight and our understanding [of the words] is clear. 1.4adj Empty, as an open space. Du-on batò no magalat ka ngipon din. Ka ngipon din, du-on olatan no ma-awang. There is a child whose teeth are far apart. His teeth have an gap between them which is open. 1.4.1adj Open or unobstructed, as when a roof has been blown off. 1.5v [A command] to clear [something] of debris or make something which has been said more understandable. 2v To clear or become sediment free like water in a spring fed pool clears after rain has muddied the water. 3v To make free of clutter. 3.1v To say or do something to prevent, or clear away a harmful situation. [When a misfortune such as an injury or illness happens to someone, others will put index finger between lips, spit and say ‘pa-awang’, pointing to the ground, so that the same thing won’t happen to them.]

galat₁ 1adj Wide-spread, far apart. Du-on batò no magalat ka ngipon din. Ka ngipon din, du-on olatan no ma-awang. There is a child whose teeth are far apart. His teeth have open spaces between them. [Does not mean loose as an item of clothing that is too big.] see fr.: tago-urò. 1.1adj Loosely woven, not close together Ko oghimu ka to bogyas, magalat. Magalat ka lawa to bogyas; magalat ka galow. When you make a fish trap, it is loosely woven. The body of the fishtrap is loosely woven and the prongs are also far apart. [Fish traps, nets and screen are all magalat because there is space between the strands of rattan, nylon or wire. These items are built strongly, the pieces intertwined but not solid.] 2v To leave behind in someone's care, esp. of a child Ko oglo-ug ka inoy to batò no oghilamon, ipagalat din ka anak din diò to songo otow no ian ka ogtamong. When the mother of a child goes to weed [her field], she leaves her child in the care of someone else and that person watches over him/her. 3v To take care of someone left behind Si Taganay ka niggalatan to anak ni Lita. Taganay is the one who took care of Lita's children who were left behind. 4v To leave something behind for someone, such as food for a child Ka inoy, oggalatan to homoy no igpalugaw no igpako-on to anak din. A mother leaves rice behind for gruel to be fed to her child. 5vs To leave behind (involuntarily) Ko ogkamatoy ki, ka mgo kalaglagan ta ogkaggalat dò no konò ta ogka-alap diò to kamatayon. When we die, our possessions are simply left behind and cannot be taken where we will be after we die.
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