Search results for "alad"

alad 1n Fence or wall around a yard, house or garden Agad matikang woy ko masagkop, makopal woy ko manipis no igliu to baloy woy ko lama, ogkohingaranan no alad. Even if it is high or if it is short, thick or thin and surrounds a house or the yard, it is called an alad fense. [A wall around a yard or garden is not called an alabat “wall (of a house)” because by definition, an alabat requires a roof. If it is a wall that does not have a roof, it is an alad or fense.] 2v To make a fence 3v To fence something in. 4v For many to make a fense, esp. to trap wild pigs by fencing them in.

kalad. see fr.: pisang 1.

lalad v 1join together, as villages ?? Ko du-on oghimuon no oglalaron noy, tagsongo punduk, [o] suun. If there are those which we-excl join together, [they are] each a small unit, [or] a satallite (??) [DB gave example of five areas joined together such as Salug, Tala-Ingod, Langilan and Tagpopo-ot which become part of the Langilan area.] 2to bring together?? Ka tibò no pogbuyagon to simbaan, ian oglaad. All the leaders of the church(es), they are the ones who are joined together. Oglaaron din. He will bring them together. [DB if one uses ogpanlaad, it is in one direction, ie. on the way to a meeting, not on the way back (maybe because one is adding to the group on the way to a meeting but the reverse would not be true. Maybe there is another word for dropping off people on the way back.)]

panalad see fr.: dat-ag.

talad phr.: ingkatalaran ... ka goinawa. 1v To share; divide into shares. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy They cut the meat up and then divided it nto shares and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head. Wà ki matalari. They couldn’t share with us. [DB said katoinan implies sharing something previously prepared, contrasted to talaran, talad which he said may be done on the spur of the moment such as when people are eating rice and someone asks for a ganta. When a wild pig is caught, the custom was to share equal portions to all the houses in the village. There would be no charge. This sharing is also done with fish and other kinds of meats (especially those obtained by hunting) but not so often of rice except for a family in need.] see fr.: sagap 1; see fr.: toin 2; osyn: toin 1. 2v To distribute, as pay ??. 3Late ??

kapunganan n 1One’s posterity, decendent. [Ocring said in his dialect kapunganan would refer to descendents a long time removed; pinanganak would be used of more immediate descendents.] see: pinanganak; see fr.: anak 10. 2A physical characteristic which is passed down from one generation to the next, such as a malady or outgrowth of the body. [DB says that if a disease or physical malady such as swelling of the knees is is experienced by another generation people will say that is kapungan ta -- that is, they conceive that it has been passed down. (DB 21/Jan/2006)]

toin 1v share, divide up [something] with others [TA said katoinan implies sharing something previously prepared, contrasted to talaran, talad which he said may be done on the spur of the moment.] see fr.: sagap 1; osyn: talad 1. 2share; divide [something] with others see: talad 1.

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

gupal v To chop nto pieces as chicken the bones of which are also cut through. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy They cut the meat up and then divided it nto shares and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head. Ko oggupalon ka dulian, ogporion ta. When we chop the dulian fruit, we cut it in half lengthwise. [A heavier knife is generally used to strike and cut the meat or fruit. With chicken and mets, the pieces are chopped crosswise but the dulian fruit is split as it is cut in half vertically.; Contrasts with slicing as meat is struck with a sharp instrument as a heavy knife.] osyn: gotad 1; osyn: gotad 3, pisang 1; gen: tampod 1.
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