Search results for "alukuy"

alukuy 1n A friend. 2v To discuss something with someone else. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone desires to get married, he will pursue it. He will continuously discuss it with the father [of the girl] until he agrees (lit says “yes”). [This word seems to apply to discussion of specific issues and not to casual conversation. Ogpanangnangonoy seems to apply more correctly to casual conversation and exchange of general information.] 2.1v The thing which is being discussed. Ian dò ogka-alukuy ko songo monu ka igbotad no gastu to sikan no boi. The only thing they will be discussing is how much they will pay immediately upon request as a brideprice for that girl. 2.2v That which is discussed; topic of discussion. Ko du-on otow no og-utang di ogkasipod no ognangon, di songo otow on ka ognangonan din. Ogkagi to sikan no otow to, “Du-on ig-alukuy din koykow.” If there is a person who [wants to] borrow get something on credit but is ashamed to speak up, then he will tell another person. That person will say, “He has something to discuss with you.” 2.3v To have a group discussion. Ogma-al-alukuyoy ka mgo buyag tongod ko du-on mgo lupuganon. The leaders are having a group discussion about whether there will be [eventual] reciprocal exhanges for a brideprice. 3deriv n Discussion. Ian on amoy-amoy ka ogtangkò to alukuyan. The person who speaks on behalf of the man is the spokesman for the discussion (lit. one who faces the discussion). [In a wedding arrangement, the spokesman for the man is called an amoy-amoy (a term used for an adoptive or foster father).] 4deriv n A friendship gift. Pal-alukuyan dan. [It is] their friendship gift.

abalang 1v Seek out. Ko oglapas ki, og-aliguan ta ka maralom no og-abalang ki to mababow oyow konò ki ogka-alus diò to linow. When we cross [a river], we detour around the deep [part] and seek out the shallow [area] so that we won't be swept away by the current into the deep pool. [In the following example, a person is looking for a shallow place to cross a river in order not to be swept away by the current.] 2v To relentlessly pursue; to be after something, as a purpose. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will keep on discussing it with the father until he says yes. Kagi to balu, “Og-abalangon ku ka baloy no nighimu ni Jeremy di warò pad igkabayad ku.” The widow said, “I’m after the house that Jeremy made but I don't yet have anything to use for payment.” Ko ogkalituk on ka og-abalangon din, ogbuyu-on din on. When it is clear what she is after, [then] she will ask for it. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. Og-iling ka otow, “Nokoy ka og-abalangon to asu?” The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. Someone says, “What is that dog after? [If a person requests something which isn't given the first time he will keep coming back until the person finally gives what is requested. This can apply to a young man who keeps returning to talk to the father of a girl he wants to marry or can apply to a dog who keeps digging because he smells a rat and is determined to get it.] 3v That which someone is relentlessly pursuing. Og-atangan ku ka ig-abalangi din. I am blocking that which he is relentlessly pursuing. [The following example concerned an effort to dissuade a patient from returning home before he was well enough to do so.] see: buyù 1; see fr.: tu-ud 1. 4deriv n A person who is very persistent. Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. Ogko-iling to ogkapogos ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. It's as though the person from whom he is making a request is forced [to give it]. [If one day he asks for something and you don't give it, he will keep coming back in following days to request until you give it to him.]

bokas v 1To initiate a conversation, or a discussion such as that of a marriage arrangement. Ka oghun-a ogkagi, sikan ka ogbokas to alukuyan. The person who is first to speak, that is the one who initiates the discussion. 2To release, as trigger of a trap. Ko ogkabokas on ka bagwanan to balatik, du-on on ogsagad no babuy. When the trigger of the pig trap is released, a pig which has been caught. see: basikal. 3To block as an inlet from a river so as to drain area and catch fish in traps. Ka otow no ogngangalap to siak to woig, ogbokason din ka og-atangan din ka siak oyow og-otì on. A person who is fishing on a tributary of the river blocks the tributary so that it will dry up. [The common thread of meaning may be that the blocking of the river initiates the trapping of the fish, someone walking into an ambush, initiates/sets in motion the act of spearing an enemy, and the person who speaks first, initiates the conversation. A person who is angry, lets loose with angry words and/or a physical attack. (In the latter case, ogtokow his words take others by surprise.] see: atang 1. 4To vent, as anger in such a way that people are taken by surprise. Ka otow no nabolù, nigbokas ka nigkagi; nigparagas nigkagi. Nigma-agbot to nigkagi su ogkatokow ki. The angry person, vented [his] anger; he went right ahead and spoke. He spoke loudly because we are taken by surprise. see: tokow 1. 5To be the recipients of an angry outburst. Moirap ko ogbokasan ki to kagi. It is difficult if we are the recipients of [someone's] angry outburst. 6To strike. Ka otow no oggopas, ogbokas to usig ka ogpilak. The person who is lying in ambush, strikes [his] enemy when he spears [him].

ko-on phr.: songo pogko-on. 1v Eat. 2v Eat up! Ognangonan ta to, “Pango-on ka” oyow ogdakol ka ogko-onon din [This is said to a new guest who is shy to take very much food.] 3v To have plenty to eat. Ognangonnangon on to mgo duma rin to dio to Nasuli, mako-onon atag kandan no kai to kanta, moirap ki to ogkako-on. He will tell his companions that at Nasuli, they have plenty to eat in contrast to us here who have a difficult time eating. Ka mako-on, oglituk to dakol ka ogkako-on kai to Nasuli woy to warò bitil. The [word] mako-on means that what is eaten is plentiful here at Nasuli and there is no famine. ant: bitil 1. 4v Many have begun to eat 5v (Of a group) To be in the process of eating. Pananglitan, ko nanumbaloy a, nakasalangan a to ogko-on, kagi a to, “Ogmangoko-on kow na-an.” For example, if I have gone to visit [someone, and] I happen to arrive as they are eating, I will say, “So you are in the process of eating. ” 6v To avail oneself of an opportunity to eat [at someone else's house]. Ko ogpakapango-on ka anak ku diò to songo baloy no warò nigpataga kanak to nigko-on, og-ogotan ku. If my child avails himself/herself of an opportunity to eat at someone else's house, I will scold him/her. 7vs to be edible; can be eaten Ko konò kow ogtamong, pamanghò kow to ogkako-on." If you won't take care [of the children], go look [elsewhere] for something to eat! Ko ogkapongaan to poghimu to darua no allow, bali ogkako-on ka sikan no agkud. When two days of [this] process has been completed, finally that agkud is edible (lit. can be eaten). [The non-intentive form of the word implies eating anything edible, not just rice or a staple. The nominalized or objective form of the verb generally understood to refer to rice or a staple.] 8 9v To be in the process of eating. Kagi to magaliug, “Warò batasan ku to og-alukuy to ogko-onko-on a.” A guest said, “It isn't my custom to carry on a discussion while I am in the process of eating. 10Feed (lit. cause to eat). 11v To feed someone. 12A staple food, esp. rice, dried grains or sweet potatoes. 13Eating place.

lalow 1v To become alienated to such an extent that the persons involved will not speak to each other. They also pronounce curses on each other if they should ever see each other again. Ka oglalalow, ogsasapot no konad ogpa-al-alukuyoy. Ogpo-us-usigoy kandan. The persons are alienated lalalow, when [someone] vows that they no longer converse. They become enemies to each other. Ka otow no oglalow to duma rin, ogpangusig sikandin. A person who becomes alienated from his companion becomes an enemy. [The belief is that if such people do happen to see each other and converse it will result in someone dying such as the children of a divorced couple. To remove that threat, gifts from each offended parties much be exchanged before the alienated persons attempt to converse.] 2v [Too fast, as when someone dies or is divorced.] ?? 3To abstain from working for a day, or to prevent others from singing or playing instruments because of being in mourning.]??

lupugan n Request for repayment, particularly of a brideprice. Ogma-al-alukuyoy ka mgo buyag tongod ko du-on mgo lupuganon The leaders are having a discussion about whether there will be [eventual] requests for reimbursement. [Relatives typically supply all or part of a brideprice for a young man. If he has a daughter, they may ask for part of the brideprice paid for her as reimbursement. If a widow obtains an animal, her in-laws may ask for it as reimbursement for what they paid as a brideprice for her. Sometimes these payments may eventually exceed what they actually paid as a brideprice.]

ungod adv 1to do constantly, always or frequently (continually??) Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will constantly discuss it with the father until he says yes. [DB says the young man in the following example will keep going back to the father to discuss the issue again until the father gives in. In this context, the ungod “constantly” means the young man will keep going back to the father.] syn: layun. 2frequently, repeatedly Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. Ko nalugoy on no ungod kandin ogpanakow, natagaan on to mgo otow no malogot to kandin ka nigpurut. When it had been a long time and he was repeatedly stealing, it became known by the people that it was true that he was the one who had taken [things]. [In the following example, the reduplication of the word oglibonglibong means to “repeatedly come back”. However, in English, to “keep coming back” already means “repeatedly” so it would be redundant to say, “keep repeatedly coming back”.]