Search results for "alus"

kalus v Scratch with claws. [This kind of scratching produces wounds in contrast to kutkut or pangutkut which would be used to scratch something that itches.] see: kutkut 1.

kalusisi n 1Small red-breasted parrot resembling a “love bird” [This is a small, green parrot similar to a “love bird”. Both have red cheeks. The female has a red head and beak. The male, referred to as the datù, has a green top notch, a red breast and red feathers on his back.] see fr.: uranda 2. 2A girlfriend, or boyfriend [DB says they have not yet decided to get married but they like each other So the term "boyfriend" or "girlfriend" would apply. However However, they would be embarrassed if someone referred to their relationship in such terms. X]

salusug see fr.: toì 3.

alap v 1To bring something to a destination. Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut. Just bring the fragrant soap. see fr.: ganuy 1; see fr.: baniwal 4. 1.1To take something somewhere. Ko du-on "jeep" no nasirà no awos no og-alapon diò to "shop" oyow ogdoyroyawon, songo igpaganuy rod to dangob no jeep. If there is a jeep which is broken down which need sto be taken to the shop to be repaired, it is also pulled by another jeep. spec: sakopu, utuk 1, baba, pangkul, ti-ang 1, bitbit 1, soy-ung, layap; see: hatod 2. 2To move or propel as fins move a fish through water. Ka alongaping, ian ka ogbo-ot to og-alap to lawa to sikan no ngalap. The fin by the fish's ear, that is what determines the movement (lit. carrying) of the body of that fish. 3To be carried away, as by water. Ko ogsamba, du-on baloy no ogka-alap. When [the river] floods, there are house(s) which are carried away. spec: alus 1; see fr.: anlas 3. 4To have someone to take something somewhere; send. 5(Fig) To be under someone's authority. Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 5.1(Fig) To carry a responsibility or hold authority. Si Joaquin pad ka naka-alap to katondanan to kapitanto Baranggay Gupitan. Joaquin is still the one who has held the position (lit. authority) of captain of Baranggay Gupitan. 5.1.1To be under someone's authority Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 6For something to be brought to someone. 6.1To be transmitted to, as an illness. Ko og-uma ka dalu no tiklas diò to songo ugpa-an, ko du-on ogpanumbaloy no ogligkat to sikan no ugpa-an, ogka-alapan ki to dalu. If an illness comes to some place, [and] if someone visits from that place, the illness will be transmitted (lit. inadvertantly carried) to us. see: halin 2.1. 6.2To be used in a certain way, as a word. Ian dò ogka-alapan no kinagian ko du-on duma ta no oghinggat to ogparigus no ogkagian ku to, “Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut.” The only way the word is used (lit. the only [meaning] carried by the word) is if we have a companion whom [we] invite to go bathing with us and I say, "Just bring the fragrant soap".

kutkut v 1To scratch with claws, as the ground. [DB says pangalkal applies particularly of chickens scratching in lagut leaves, etc. Whereas kutkut applies more of scratching/digging in dirt. (Is this different from “digging” below? DB gives an example of a chicken is digging up seeds with its claws.)] see fr.: kalus; see fr.: kalkal; see fr.: kali 1; see: kalkal, pangalkal. 2dig (as a dog or other animal) 2.1To dig with claws or one's hands. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. 3Scratch (as something that itches.)

toì 1n Stitch, as a doctor’s stich. Hon-om ka toì dii to momol ku. Kara toì nigbalintus. There are six stitches in my gums. Each one was knotted. [A doctor's stitch is a toì because each stitch was nigbalintus knotted. Each one has a buku knot.] spec: salugsug 4. 2v To sew. 3see: salusug. 4Native pants or shirt sewn out of torn material. 5Blanket stitch. Konò ogkatibug no ogtoi-on ta. What we sew won’t run out well.

uranda 1n A love song style. [Sung by either a man or a woman] see fr.: kanta 2; ant: kumapoy 2. 2n A suitor, fiancee, male; or a woman whom someone will marry. [A person who just newly meets a person of the opposite sex and likes him or her, they say it is alig pad to mata j“ust an attaction of the eyes” and the person is not really an uranda. If the relationship is serious, then they have become nokog-uranda on, nokogsabut. “They will already have become fiancee; [they have] an agreement with each other.” [regarding marriage].] see: kumapoy 1; see: kalusisi 1. 3v To sing a love song [This style is sung by either a man or a woman.]

abalang 1v Seek out. Ko oglapas ki, og-aliguan ta ka maralom no og-abalang ki to mababow oyow konò ki ogka-alus diò to linow. When we cross [a river], we detour around the deep [part] and seek out the shallow [area] so that we won't be swept away by the current into the deep pool. [In the following example, a person is looking for a shallow place to cross a river in order not to be swept away by the current.] 2v To relentlessly pursue; to be after something, as a purpose. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will keep on discussing it with the father until he says yes. Kagi to balu, “Og-abalangon ku ka baloy no nighimu ni Jeremy di warò pad igkabayad ku.” The widow said, “I’m after the house that Jeremy made but I don't yet have anything to use for payment.” Ko ogkalituk on ka og-abalangon din, ogbuyu-on din on. When it is clear what she is after, [then] she will ask for it. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. Og-iling ka otow, “Nokoy ka og-abalangon to asu?” The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. Someone says, “What is that dog after? [If a person requests something which isn't given the first time he will keep coming back until the person finally gives what is requested. This can apply to a young man who keeps returning to talk to the father of a girl he wants to marry or can apply to a dog who keeps digging because he smells a rat and is determined to get it.] 3v That which someone is relentlessly pursuing. Og-atangan ku ka ig-abalangi din. I am blocking that which he is relentlessly pursuing. [The following example concerned an effort to dissuade a patient from returning home before he was well enough to do so.] see: buyù 1; see fr.: tu-ud 1. 4deriv n A person who is very persistent. Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. Ogko-iling to ogkapogos ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. It's as though the person from whom he is making a request is forced [to give it]. [If one day he asks for something and you don't give it, he will keep coming back in following days to request until you give it to him.]

batuk 1v To find, discover. Inat konò ogpakabatuk. It's as if one cannot discover [the meaning]. Warò ki pad makabatuk to maroyow no dalan. We had not yet discovered the good path. Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. [The mixture] is buried in the ground for two days [before]] finding [it to have become] the agkud delicacy. see fr.: tugul 3; see fr.: kita 2; see fr.: tolom 3. 2v To be effective. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever medicine is effective against an illness, that is strong medicine. 3v To identify, such as to narrow down to the one person whom one would marry. Ko konò ogkahalin ka goinawa nu diò to duma no boi, no ian nu ogbatukon ka sikan no boi no nasabutan nu. If your love (lit. breath) does not change to another girl, then you have identified the girl with whom you had an agreement [to be the one whom you would marry]. [The sense here seems to be that one's search is narrowed down to this one person so that one knows she is the one he is looking for.] see: tu-on 1. 4v To locate, or go to a specific place for a specific purpose. Ka kunto-on no tipouri no mgo otow, du-on batasan to du-on on indosanan no kasilyas no du-on dò ogbatuk ka og-indos. As for the present-day people who have come later (lit. last), there is a custom to have an outhouse for defecating and so that is [the only] place people will go to to defecate. [The following seems to mean that in contrast to the past when people defecated anywhere, now people go to only that specific location which has been made for that purpose.] 5v To find or locate Ko oglapas ki, ko konò ki ogpakabatuk to mababow su mabolbol ka woig, ogka-alus ki diò to maralom. If we cross [a river], if we cannot locate a shallow area because the water is swift, we will be carried away by the current to a deep area. 6v To get at, or be effective against, as an illness. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever the medicine is which gets at the illness, that is efficatious (lit. strong) medicine. see: tu-on ??. 7v To be passed down, as some characteristic or authority which is recognized in someone's descendant Sikan ka oghingaranan noy no batuk to anak. Ka katondanan ni Dabid, nigbatuk ki Husi. No ka katondanan ni Husi, nigbatuk man dò diò ki Hisus. That is [what] we call passed down to an offspring. The authority of David, it is passed down to Joseph. And the authority of Joseph, it is then passed down to/found in in Jesus. 8v to find to be [or to have become] something Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. That which found to be agkud is buried in the ground for two days. [In the following example, the it takes two days for the mixture of ingredients to change into the food item called akud.] 9Retrieve food once cached away. 10Return. 11v find out, reveal 12Kabatukon ku so-i komos. ???

dakol phr.: Dakol ka goinawa; phr.: ian dakol. 1adj Big; large in size. Ka abu-on, dakol no manukmanuk no og-ugpò to koilawan. A heron is a big bird which lives in the forest. see fr.: pagamayan. 2adj A lot, or large amount of something Dakol ka hilamonon to homoy ni Inò Mother has a lot of weeds in her rice [field]. 2.1adj many Ko dakol ka igko-untud to gakit, ogka-agod-od on. If many [people] get on a raft, it will become submerged. 2.2adj lot, or large amount of something. Ko dakol ka urang, ogkaponù ka luang to balutu. If there is a lot of rain, the interior of the boat will become full [of water]. 3adv Profuse. Dakol ka pogpasalamat ku ki Joaquin ka nigpangabangan a rin. My expressions of thanks to Joaquin were profuse for his having saved me. [DB says he would have expressed his thanks in words -- it implies many but also includes the emotion of joy.] 4adv Very much. Ka bogas to katumbal, dakol no ogpakabulig ko du-on turakan ta no agoloy no ogtasikan. [As for] the fruit of the red pepper, it helps very much if we have a corn field which has a tasikan blight/disease. see: lagboy 1. 5adj Forceful. No ko oghulid sikandan, ogdagsangan to dakol no lugung woy kilat. And then when they laid down next to each other [to sleep], they were struck by a forceful [clap] of thunder and lightning. see: agbot 2. 6v To increase, do something in greater measure; excessively. Ognangonan ta ka magaliug ta to, “Pango-on ka; hinalatoy ka,” oyow ogdakol ka ogko-onon din. We tell our guest, “Eat up; fill up”, so that he will eat more (lit. increase his eating). Nigdakol ka uran gabi-i su napawa-an no warò pad nigtilo-tò. It rained excessively yesterday because [it rained] all night until morning without stopping. 7v To increase Ogdakolon ta ka homoy to og-angoy diò to pinayag su ogka-atangan ki to oglanog ka Liboganon. We will increase [the amount of] rice which we fetch from the rice shelter because we will be blocked by the swollen Liboganon [river]. 8v To do something in great measure, such as to give a large amount of something. Bogayi nu si Tunin to homoy woy dakola nu to ogbogoy. Give Tunin some rice and give her a large amount [of rice]. see: timul. 9adj very large Ka ogbobol-og, ogpamusil to babuy no magintalunan, usa, ubal, ko manukmanuk no dagdakol. Those who go hunting with a weapon, they shoot wild pigs, deer, monkey(s), or very large birds. 10adj Forceful, very heavy (lit. very big), as rain Wà dò malugoy, nigdagsang ka ma-agbot no kilat woy lugung woy daddakol no uran. Not long later, a loud crack of lightning and thunder struck along with very heavy (lit. very big) rain. 11adj Very big; biggest Ka takubung, ngaran to ambow no daddakol no lukosan. Takubung is the name of the biggest of the male rodents. 12adj Bigger Dakoldakol ka lumansad no kalusisi to boian. The male love bird is bigger than the female. 13v Increase see: timul. 14Bigger, biggest, larger, largest. 15n Size, measurement Nigsokoran ku ka hawak to batò oyow ogkatagaan ku ka karakoli to hawak din. I measured the child's waist so that I would know the measurement of her waist. 16v To exalt, oneself or someone else. Maro-ot sikandin no ogpakabulig no igparakol ka batasan din. Maroyow poron ko duma no mgo otow ka ogparakol to ngaran din. That person is bad who has helped and then uses it to exalt his own conduct. It would be good if someone else was the one to exalt his name. 17To exalt oneself Ko ogparakoldakol ki to duma ta, sikan dod, songo og-ampow-ampow ki to duma ta. Ogdo-isokon ta ka duma ta. If we exalt ourselves over our companions, that is also, the same as making ourselves higher than our companions.

lapas 1v To cross, as a river or road Ko oglapas ki diò to doipag to woig, ogka-alus ki ko mabolbol ka woig to pog-apot ta. If we cross to the opposite side of the river (lit. water), we will be carried away by the current if the water is swift as we wade through it. [This can be by foot or raft.] osyn: talipag 1; see: talipag 1. 2v To lose all of one’s offspring, which is bad luck if it happens to a hen. Ko du-on upa no ogkalapasan to anak, pamalii no og-iawan to duma no otow. If a hen loses all [her] offspring, it is bad luck and other people will butcher it. [If this happens to a hen, the hen will be butchered and eaten. Nothing is done if a person loses all of one's offspring but they believe that Maro-ot ka kulis din. “[Her fate is bad.”] 3To lose all of one’s offspring pamalii for a hen.
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