Search results for "amana"

amana adv 1Enough; too much, to have had it [with someone for some reason], my goodness; not fair “Amana so goinawa nu no ma-agkap.” “Can’t you get just a little angry?” Amana so-ini no batò no ungod ogsinogow no ma-agol so bo-bò. [I've] had it with this child who is always crying who has a hollowed-out mouth! Amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init. My goodness that you have been traveling in the sun when it is excessively hot. (meaning: [You] shouldn't be traveling in the sun.) [used to express frustration, irritation or surprise about something or someone. Some idiomatic English expressions connote similar iconcepts in the following examples:] 2With negative: [not] quite, [not] so much Ka abu-on, ogko-iling to kolor no abug. Konò amana no maputì; ogsolug. [The color of the abu-on bird resembles the color of ashes. It isn't quite white; it's [color] is mixed. 3An exclamation indicating surprise, sometimes with a hint of disapproval. The meaning is similar to the English expression, “goodness gracious”. Amana so goinawa nu no ma-agkap! How can you be so calm! Amana so-ini no batò no ungod ogsinogow no ma-agol so bo-bò. Goodness gracious this child who is always crying whose mouth is a cavern (lit. hollow)! Amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init Goodness gracious that you travelled in the sunshine when it is exceedingly hot! [The following was the surprised response of a neighbor who wondered how someone could stay peaceful/calm when being threatened. There is also a hint that the speaker wishes he would at least get a little upset.] 4Idiom similar to English, “Bless your heart”, or “You poor thing”. Amana-amana ka bag no sasampoton koddì. Bless your heart for feeling lonely for me.

katamanan see fr.: tapus 2.

abu-on n A greyish white bird, yellow bellied sapsucker ?? Ka abu-on, ko-iling to batok no alibu. Konò amana no mapotì; ogsolug. The abu-on bird, it's like the color (lit. design) of ashes. It's not so white; it's [color] is mixed. [ DB said there are not many left in the Maambago area. He said they do have a yellowish breast. The beak is not so curved; more like a chicken's bill. It eats fruits such as the balitì fruit. It's feet are similar to a chicken's except that they are smooth.] gen: manukmanuk.

agubanga v Slightly unripe, as bananas or papaya. Og-agubanga ka kapayas; warò pad amana noinug. The papaya is unevenly ripe and unripe; it isn't quite ripe yet. [Texture of something partially ripe which is hard on the outside, soft in the middle as an unripe bananas or papaya.]

allow 1n sun Ogsilò ka allow to masolom. The sun rises in the morning. 2n day Du-on papitu no allow to songo simana. There are seven day(s) in a week. 3n Time or season for some activity, or for something to happen. Di mangkuan, ko allow on to pogsanggì, warò nakasanggì ka nig-orok. But later on, when it was time to harvest [the corn], the people who had planted didn't get to harvest. 4adj Daytime. Ko ma-allow, ogmatikang on ka allow. If it is daytime, the sun is high. 4.1n Bright daylight. Og-iling ka inoy to, “Onow kow on su ma-allow on.” Ogmalayag on ka allow. The mother says something like, “You-pl. get up because it is bright daylight already.” The sun is shining brightly already. 5deriv n A sunny period of time or season. guabung Ko tig-allow on, ogtokoron ta no du-on gulabung su ogko-otian ka mgo bo-ugan woy ogpanlanos ka mgo apusow, payow woy mgo pangamuton. When it is already summer (lit. a sunny period of time), we recognize that is dry season because the streams dry up and the apusow, payow and [other] plants wither. [A sunny period of time is also understood to be dry as rain is limited or absent.] see: gulabung 1. 6v The sun comes out as after a rain. Ko ogpanomsolom no og-uran di mangkuan ogtilotò dò, og-aldow. When it is very early and it is raining but later [after] the rain quits, the sun comes out. 7deriv n A day of the week, when asked as a question. Ko du-on og-insò, “Nokoy aldowa asolom?” Ian ig-insò su warò mataga ko nokoy ka asolom ko Lunis woy ko Mierkulis bua. If someone asks, “What day is tomorrow?” The reason he is asking is because he does not know whether the next day (lit. tomorrow) might be Monday or Wednesday. 8deriv v To do anything in the sun, esp. to walk or travel in the sun. Sagpit kow pad woy inum kow no amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init. Stop by for a while and drink something -- for pity sakes that you were walking in the sun when it is too hot.

bungkù v 1To come to an end, limit; boundary. Ko hondo-i ogkataman ka hikot to asu, du-on dò ogbungkù. Wherever the tether of the dog ends, that is where he will be limited. Du-on otow no nalagak ka salapi din no darua no gatus. Nigbungkù dò du-on to namanghò di warò din on kita-a. There was a person ho lost two hundred [pesos] of his money. He came to an end of looking for it but didn't find it. 2Give up on someone or something, as when an action proves futile Ko du-on duma ta no du-on batasan no konò ogkabalowbalow, ogbungku-an tad ka og-anad kandin to maroyow. If we have a companion who has conduct which cannot be changed, we sgive up on teaching him [to do] good. 3To run out of options, as a doctor who cannot treat an illness. Nigbungku-an on to doctor si Ann Joy. Agad ko du-on ogkoimu on dan to ogpangabang, ogkamatoy rò sikandin. The doctor gran out of options for Ann Joy. Even if there was something they could do to save her, she would still die. see: tawad 1; see: taman 1. 4To allow to go so far and no farther such as when cutting a field. Ka otow no ogkakamot, du-on patamanan din ka ogpo-ilisan ka kamot din no ian ka pabungku-an to kamot din. A person who is making a field, has an ending of the edge of his field and that is how far he will ballow his field to extend. [It may not be the boundry of his property but it is the farthest extent to which he will have his field cut.] 4.1To set a limit. Ka lubid to asu ka ogpakabungkù oyow du-on dò ogkataman. The rope is that which is setting a limit it so that it will not go any farther.

dalangin 1vt To run an errand find out something, such as whether one can buy newly butchered meat. Ko du-on og-iow to babuy, kalabow, kuddò ogsugù koy to, "Dalangin kow su du-on nangiow to babuy. Purut kow to agad songo kilo." If someone is butchering a pig, water buffalo, [or] horse, we will command someone, “Go check it out because someone has butchered a pig. Get even one kilo.” see: lo-uy 2; see: ma-an 2. 2vi To be en route to go to a destination as an evil spirit which is en route to check out a dead person. Konò kow amana ogli-ag diò to tanò su ogkabaya-an kow to busow no ogdalangin to namatoy. Don't play so much outside (lit. on the ground) because you will happen to be in the path of evil spirit(s) which are en route to check out a dead person. 3v [For many people] to check something out Ko du-on og-iow, moon-ing ka oghondu-on ka ogdalanginan. If there is [an animal] being butchered, many go to check it out. 4v To delegate someone to do something. Kunto-on, to warò liwak nu to oghondiò to Malaybalay, nigdalanginan ta si Jaimi su du-on tu-ud din diò to Malaybalay no ian ta pinaboli to mgo gulayon. Today, since you didn’t have time to go to Malaybalay, we delegated Jaimi to do it [for us] because he had a purpose in Malaybalay and so we had him buy the food items. see: pagindalan; see: saligan. 5v To be pursued, as by evil spirits who want the game that a person is carrying. Ogdanginan ka otow to busow no ogbababa to babuy su ogngarog to langosa. A person who is carrying a pig on his back will be pursued by an evil spirit because it smells the blood. [Said to happen if one is carrying a pig after dark or when the light outside is dim because the spirit(s) are after the blood of the animal because it wants to take the animal away from the person. It is believed that the enounter may result in that person becoming ill.]
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