Search results for "ayun"

ipos n 1A small roach. see fr.: ampal; gen: bakukang 2. 2A hard shiny sea shell worn on tayun.

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

matul-id see fr.: ayun 2.

ungod adv 1to do constantly, always or frequently (continually??) Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will constantly discuss it with the father until he says yes. [DB says the young man in the following example will keep going back to the father to discuss the issue again until the father gives in. In this context, the ungod “constantly” means the young man will keep going back to the father.] syn: layun. 2frequently, repeatedly Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. Ko nalugoy on no ungod kandin ogpanakow, natagaan on to mgo otow no malogot to kandin ka nigpurut. When it had been a long time and he was repeatedly stealing, it became known by the people that it was true that he was the one who had taken [things]. [In the following example, the reduplication of the word oglibonglibong means to “repeatedly come back”. However, in English, to “keep coming back” already means “repeatedly” so it would be redundant to say, “keep repeatedly coming back”.]

ambò v 1Lean on something as a means of conveyance while floating Ko sagboka nu ka og-ambò, og-ayunon nu to lawa nu ka bulu. Ka bolad nu, ian nu igbogsoy. When you lean on something for floatation you line up your body with the bamboo [pole]. You use your hands to paddle. [One can use ones' arms to prop oneself on bamboo or other object of conveyance, but the arms can be left free to paddle. When water is involved, the meaning includes the component of conveyance by water. When in any other place, such as a house, movement or conveyance is not a component of meaning.] 2Lean on anything, usually with arms or hands, but could be with a part of one's body Sosolobon ka ig-ambò. Lean on [something] with one's chest.

antog 1v To purposely disturb or jostle something or someone. Ogtu-uran ta to og-antog to duma ta su ogko-on kid on; ogpukawon ta. We purposely disturb our companion because we will eat now; we awaken him/her. [such as when wanting to awaken someone] see fr.: dugnal 1. 2vs To be jostled. Ko ligad ki no ogkakois ta ka lamisaan, ogka-antog su nawo-il. If we brush against the table as we pass, it is jostled because it moved. 2.1vs To be disturbed as by a touch, a noise or a movement. Ko ogkoirogò ki to mo-ugtu no du-on ogkakagi, ogka-antog ki no ogkapukawan ki. Ka doromdom ta ka na-antog. If we sleep at noon and there are those who are talking, we will be disturbed and we will be awakened. It is our thinking which was disturbed. Na-antog ka lapinid to nabus-ugan to woig no pigsogod si Elena. The wasps were disturbed by having water poured on them and then Elena was stung. 3v To jog someone's memory; remind. Ko du-on utang to duma ta no konò ogbayad, og-antogan ta to og-insò. If one of our companions has a debt which [he/she] doesn't pay, we jog his/her memory by asking. Magi-insò ka igbogoy ku no babuy kaniu, ig-antog ku to doromdom nu ko kalingawan nu ka kanak? The pig which I am giving to you is being used to open the door to inquiry to jog your memory (lit. thinking) if you have forgotten that which is mine [that is, an unpaid debt for help with a bride price]? [such as when a debt has not been paid.] 4adj To disturb someone emotionally. Na-antog ka goinawa rin to bayungbayung dò kandin. Natokow ki su warò ki no-inso-i. His emotions (lit breath) were disturbed by those were were just making [false] accusations. We were taken by surprise because we had not been asked [about it]. [that is, to have negative emotions triggered by some incident]

balungilit 1adj Cheerful. A person who is quick to laugh. Ka otow no balungilit, maga-an ogpakangisi ko ogpakakita to duma rin. Layun ogma-awang ka goinawa rin. Ogko-iling to warò igkasasow. A person who is cheerful is quick to laugh if he/she sees his/her companion(s). It's like he/she has no worries. 2n Kind of millet. [the head of which is multi-colored with a black and red design though the grains themselves are yellowish. When the grains are ripe they split open resembling a laugh so that is why this type is called balungilit which distinguishes it from other kinds of millet.]
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