Search results for "babuy"

babuyon deriv v To become unconscious. [This could be a result a convulsion or a heart attack.]

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

anak phr.: anak to dalan; phr.: anak to pamubungon. 1n A male or female offspring of an animal or human; son or daughter. 2v To give birth. Ko ogkapanoy ogkatapid ka batò diò to diralom to gotok, oglomulan ka inoy ko og-anak. If the baby (lit. child) in the abdomen has been properly positioned ahead of time, the mother will have it easier when she gives birth. Gabi-i pad nig-anak on ka kuddò ku. Just yesterday my horse gave birth. cf: agud. 2.1v To give birth in some place. - Ogdurugmun ka babuy to og-anakan din. A pig makes a bed for [a place where] she will give birth. 2.2v To give birth to multiple offspring. Ka karpa no ngalap, woy ogpanganak ko ogsilò ka bulan. Carp fish don’t give birth to multiple offspring until the moon comes out. 2.2.1v To give birth multiple times; give birth frequently. Ko du-on og-anak no warò pad nigtu-ig ka anak din no ogpanganak man dò sikandin, oghingaranan no mahariharion no manggianak su malasi og-anak. If someone gives birth when her child is not yet a year old so she is giving birth again, she is called a mother who produces siblings [one after another] because she frequently gives birth. 2.2.2v To reach birthing time. Ko du-on og-insò ko kon-u nanganak ka amboy nu, kagi to songo otow, “Ka ligad dò no allow ka pogpanganak.” If someone asks when your daughter-in-law delivered [her baby], another person will answer, “The previous day was her birthing time”. 2.2.3v Those which are birthed. Ka po-it, ka alu-an, woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it, mudfish and the catfish, are birthed alive (lit. directly live, when it is the time for them to be born [lit. the ones being birthed]. 3deriv n Uterus Ka a-anakan, sikan ka ugpa-an to batò diò gotok to inoy. The uterus, that is the dwelling place of the child in the abdomen of the mother. 4deriv n An adopted child. Ogko-iling ki Ugalinga no nig-uyamu to mgo batò, ogkoimu no anak-anak ran. It’s like Ugalinga who is caring from the childen, they have become heir adopted children. see: uyamuan. 4.1deriv n A stepchild. [A stepchild, that is the child of one's spouse is an anak-anak but not considered to be an uyamuan which is used of an adopted or foster child] 5deriv n Nephew or neice, also a cousin’s child. Si Binitu, songo maka-amung ku rod su anakon ku si Angelina. As for Binitu, he has also become my son-in-law because Angelina is my neice. 6deriv n Anything that has a young offspring; a mother, but especially a nursing mother. Ka mgo ngalap to woig no poit maroyow ka sabow rin to duon iam no manggi-anak su oggatasan. As for the po-it fish [lit. creatures of the water which are po-it], its soup is good for the nursing mother because [her breasts] will produce milk . [Also applies to female animals with young.] 6.1vs To become a nursing mother. Ka ogkamanggi-anak on no boi, sikan ka iam nig-anak no du-on on ogtago-uro-on no batò. Sikan ka ungod din oggibo-on, ogpasusuon, ogsakopuon woy og-uahon. A woman who has become a nursing mother, that is the one who has has newly given birth and now has a a child to care for. [Also applies to female animals who newly give birth] 7deriv n Parent and child doing something together; from parent’s standpoint. 8deriv n A child accompanied by his/her parent or parent accompanying his/her child. Ka tag-anak, ka amoy nigduruma to anak din. A child accompanied by its father, [that is when] the father has accompanied his son/daughter (lit. offspring). Ka amoy no nighondiò to lunsud, tag-anak ka nigduruma to du-on ogbolion dan diò to lunsud. The father who went to town, they are the child with his parent who accompanied each other to buy [something] in town. 8.1n A mother and her child. 9deriv v To hunt for frogs by searching for the frog eggs. Ogpaki-anak ki. We search for the offspring [of frogs]. Ogpakianak ki, ko ogkita ki to atolug to bakbak, du-on ta rò ogpamitawon ka inoy su du-on dò ian to marani ka og-olon. When we hunt for frogs, when we see the eggs of the frog, we will just find the mother [frog] because she will be there closely watching over [her eggs]. 10n Descendent of recent past [That is, descendants who were known andcan be recounted by one’s relatives in contrast to kapunganan which would refer to decendants a long time removed.] see: kapunganan 1.

antog 1v To purposely disturb or jostle something or someone. Ogtu-uran ta to og-antog to duma ta su ogko-on kid on; ogpukawon ta. We purposely disturb our companion because we will eat now; we awaken him/her. [such as when wanting to awaken someone] see fr.: dugnal 1. 2vs To be jostled. Ko ligad ki no ogkakois ta ka lamisaan, ogka-antog su nawo-il. If we brush against the table as we pass, it is jostled because it moved. 2.1vs To be disturbed as by a touch, a noise or a movement. Ko ogkoirogò ki to mo-ugtu no du-on ogkakagi, ogka-antog ki no ogkapukawan ki. Ka doromdom ta ka na-antog. If we sleep at noon and there are those who are talking, we will be disturbed and we will be awakened. It is our thinking which was disturbed. Na-antog ka lapinid to nabus-ugan to woig no pigsogod si Elena. The wasps were disturbed by having water poured on them and then Elena was stung. 3v To jog someone's memory; remind. Ko du-on utang to duma ta no konò ogbayad, og-antogan ta to og-insò. If one of our companions has a debt which [he/she] doesn't pay, we jog his/her memory by asking. Magi-insò ka igbogoy ku no babuy kaniu, ig-antog ku to doromdom nu ko kalingawan nu ka kanak? The pig which I am giving to you is being used to open the door to inquiry to jog your memory (lit. thinking) if you have forgotten that which is mine [that is, an unpaid debt for help with a bride price]? [such as when a debt has not been paid.] 4adj To disturb someone emotionally. Na-antog ka goinawa rin to bayungbayung dò kandin. Natokow ki su warò ki no-inso-i. His emotions (lit breath) were disturbed by those were were just making [false] accusations. We were taken by surprise because we had not been asked [about it]. [that is, to have negative emotions triggered by some incident]

bako-us 1v To wrap up and bind together, as meat. Ogku-on noy no babuy no ogbako-us noy on no ogbanggutan to balagon ka natongos on. We take the [cut up meat of] the pig and wrap in portions and bind with rattan that which has been wrapped up [in leaves]. [Used especially of large portions of meat or fish which are wrapped in leaves and bound with rattan so they can be carried home on a person's back or suspended from a strap across ones' forehead. Would also apply if a sack or plastic were used if it is bound. Would not apply to carrying things that are not eaten.)] 2deriv n A portion of fish or game that has been wrapped and bound. Tagsagboka no otow, du-on ka kandin no binako-us. Each person has his own bound portion [of meat]/.

balungkag 1n The long hair at the back of the neck. Ko du-on ka malayat bulbul to tongol to otow, ogngaranan to balungkag to babuy. Ka lituk, ogpoko-utol to babuy no magintalunan. Ka dangob no lituk to sikan, ogsu-ut to babuy. If a person has [some strands of] long hair at the base of the neck, it is called the balungkag of the pig The meaning is that he will be able to get a wild pig. The other meaning is that he resembles a pig. [especially of a pig or goat] 2n A necklace or belt made with beads sewn or woven into hair. [This may be a chain-like necklace of human or animal hair but is often made from hair of a horse's talil.; May be made into a necklace or belt.] see: bagakis; see: siapid. 3v Have hair standing on end, as of pig or cat.

bokas v 1To initiate a conversation, or a discussion such as that of a marriage arrangement. Ka oghun-a ogkagi, sikan ka ogbokas to alukuyan. The person who is first to speak, that is the one who initiates the discussion. 2To release, as trigger of a trap. Ko ogkabokas on ka bagwanan to balatik, du-on on ogsagad no babuy. When the trigger of the pig trap is released, a pig which has been caught. see: basikal. 3To block as an inlet from a river so as to drain area and catch fish in traps. Ka otow no ogngangalap to siak to woig, ogbokason din ka og-atangan din ka siak oyow og-otì on. A person who is fishing on a tributary of the river blocks the tributary so that it will dry up. [The common thread of meaning may be that the blocking of the river initiates the trapping of the fish, someone walking into an ambush, initiates/sets in motion the act of spearing an enemy, and the person who speaks first, initiates the conversation. A person who is angry, lets loose with angry words and/or a physical attack. (In the latter case, ogtokow his words take others by surprise.] see: atang 1. 4To vent, as anger in such a way that people are taken by surprise. Ka otow no nabolù, nigbokas ka nigkagi; nigparagas nigkagi. Nigma-agbot to nigkagi su ogkatokow ki. The angry person, vented [his] anger; he went right ahead and spoke. He spoke loudly because we are taken by surprise. see: tokow 1. 5To be the recipients of an angry outburst. Moirap ko ogbokasan ki to kagi. It is difficult if we are the recipients of [someone's] angry outburst. 6To strike. Ka otow no oggopas, ogbokas to usig ka ogpilak. The person who is lying in ambush, strikes [his] enemy when he spears [him].

dakol phr.: Dakol ka goinawa; phr.: ian dakol. 1adj Big; large in size. Ka abu-on, dakol no manukmanuk no og-ugpò to koilawan. A heron is a big bird which lives in the forest. see fr.: pagamayan. 2adj A lot, or large amount of something Dakol ka hilamonon to homoy ni Inò Mother has a lot of weeds in her rice [field]. 2.1adj many Ko dakol ka igko-untud to gakit, ogka-agod-od on. If many [people] get on a raft, it will become submerged. 2.2adj lot, or large amount of something. Ko dakol ka urang, ogkaponù ka luang to balutu. If there is a lot of rain, the interior of the boat will become full [of water]. 3adv Profuse. Dakol ka pogpasalamat ku ki Joaquin ka nigpangabangan a rin. My expressions of thanks to Joaquin were profuse for his having saved me. [DB says he would have expressed his thanks in words -- it implies many but also includes the emotion of joy.] 4adv Very much. Ka bogas to katumbal, dakol no ogpakabulig ko du-on turakan ta no agoloy no ogtasikan. [As for] the fruit of the red pepper, it helps very much if we have a corn field which has a tasikan blight/disease. see: lagboy 1. 5adj Forceful. No ko oghulid sikandan, ogdagsangan to dakol no lugung woy kilat. And then when they laid down next to each other [to sleep], they were struck by a forceful [clap] of thunder and lightning. see: agbot 2. 6v To increase, do something in greater measure; excessively. Ognangonan ta ka magaliug ta to, “Pango-on ka; hinalatoy ka,” oyow ogdakol ka ogko-onon din. We tell our guest, “Eat up; fill up”, so that he will eat more (lit. increase his eating). Nigdakol ka uran gabi-i su napawa-an no warò pad nigtilo-tò. It rained excessively yesterday because [it rained] all night until morning without stopping. 7v To increase Ogdakolon ta ka homoy to og-angoy diò to pinayag su ogka-atangan ki to oglanog ka Liboganon. We will increase [the amount of] rice which we fetch from the rice shelter because we will be blocked by the swollen Liboganon [river]. 8v To do something in great measure, such as to give a large amount of something. Bogayi nu si Tunin to homoy woy dakola nu to ogbogoy. Give Tunin some rice and give her a large amount [of rice]. see: timul. 9adj very large Ka ogbobol-og, ogpamusil to babuy no magintalunan, usa, ubal, ko manukmanuk no dagdakol. Those who go hunting with a weapon, they shoot wild pigs, deer, monkey(s), or very large birds. 10adj Forceful, very heavy (lit. very big), as rain Wà dò malugoy, nigdagsang ka ma-agbot no kilat woy lugung woy daddakol no uran. Not long later, a loud crack of lightning and thunder struck along with very heavy (lit. very big) rain. 11adj Very big; biggest Ka takubung, ngaran to ambow no daddakol no lukosan. Takubung is the name of the biggest of the male rodents. 12adj Bigger Dakoldakol ka lumansad no kalusisi to boian. The male love bird is bigger than the female. 13v Increase see: timul. 14Bigger, biggest, larger, largest. 15n Size, measurement Nigsokoran ku ka hawak to batò oyow ogkatagaan ku ka karakoli to hawak din. I measured the child's waist so that I would know the measurement of her waist. 16v To exalt, oneself or someone else. Maro-ot sikandin no ogpakabulig no igparakol ka batasan din. Maroyow poron ko duma no mgo otow ka ogparakol to ngaran din. That person is bad who has helped and then uses it to exalt his own conduct. It would be good if someone else was the one to exalt his name. 17To exalt oneself Ko ogparakoldakol ki to duma ta, sikan dod, songo og-ampow-ampow ki to duma ta. Ogdo-isokon ta ka duma ta. If we exalt ourselves over our companions, that is also, the same as making ourselves higher than our companions.

dalangin 1vt To run an errand find out something, such as whether one can buy newly butchered meat. Ko du-on og-iow to babuy, kalabow, kuddò ogsugù koy to, "Dalangin kow su du-on nangiow to babuy. Purut kow to agad songo kilo." If someone is butchering a pig, water buffalo, [or] horse, we will command someone, “Go check it out because someone has butchered a pig. Get even one kilo.” see: lo-uy 2; see: ma-an 2. 2vi To be en route to go to a destination as an evil spirit which is en route to check out a dead person. Konò kow amana ogli-ag diò to tanò su ogkabaya-an kow to busow no ogdalangin to namatoy. Don't play so much outside (lit. on the ground) because you will happen to be in the path of evil spirit(s) which are en route to check out a dead person. 3v [For many people] to check something out Ko du-on og-iow, moon-ing ka oghondu-on ka ogdalanginan. If there is [an animal] being butchered, many go to check it out. 4v To delegate someone to do something. Kunto-on, to warò liwak nu to oghondiò to Malaybalay, nigdalanginan ta si Jaimi su du-on tu-ud din diò to Malaybalay no ian ta pinaboli to mgo gulayon. Today, since you didn’t have time to go to Malaybalay, we delegated Jaimi to do it [for us] because he had a purpose in Malaybalay and so we had him buy the food items. see: pagindalan; see: saligan. 5v To be pursued, as by evil spirits who want the game that a person is carrying. Ogdanginan ka otow to busow no ogbababa to babuy su ogngarog to langosa. A person who is carrying a pig on his back will be pursued by an evil spirit because it smells the blood. [Said to happen if one is carrying a pig after dark or when the light outside is dim because the spirit(s) are after the blood of the animal because it wants to take the animal away from the person. It is believed that the enounter may result in that person becoming ill.]