Search results for "baloy"

baloy deriv. of: babaloy, og=, nig=. 1n House, building. spec: bakalag, pinayag 1. 2deriv n Household. Agad hontow ka ogpoko-ugpò to kandin no baloy, songo balayan on. Whoever lives at his/her house, [they are] one household. 3deriv v Domesticated, as a pig in the village in contrast to magintalunan which would refer to a wild pig. 4deriv n Old house; one that is becoming old. Ogkabinalayan on ka baloy. The house is getting old. 5deriv n Home owner including family members but not guests; master of household. see: tagbanwa. 6deriv n A request on the basis of a relationship as that of being a neighbor or friend who has previously done a favor for the person from whom the request is made. Tagibaloy to nasagman a nu rò su si Unisimu ka oghinguma on diò to baloy nu. ??? that you just showed hospitality to me because Onisimus is the one who arrived at your house. Tagibaloy (unawa ??) to nigsagman si [Pablo] ko nigdatong [si Unisimu] diò to baloy ni Pilimun su ligkat diò ki Pablo ka pogtokod din. It was like [Paul] was welcomed when Onisimus arrived at the house [of Philemon] because his acknowledgement [of Onisimus] came from [his relationship with] Paul. [DB comment regarding what Paul had proposed to Philemon regarding receiving Onisimus in his stead.]

baloy to tamusan phr. of: tamusan. hive of a tamusan bee. [One may see a small amount of dark-colored bees’ wax at the entrance of the hive. [A tiny piece of pitch fastened to a strand of a baby’s hair.]]

songo baloy phr. of: babaloy, og=, nig=. Neighbor, next door. [or a house in the vicinity.] see: sunkud.

agpot 1n To be an outsider , that is, someone who is living in a location other than his own. Ko oghalin ki diò songo ugpa-an, mgo agpot ki rò. Agad duma ta no Manobò, mgo agpot ki rod su konò no ugpa-an ta. If we move to another place, we are just outsiders. Even if they are our fellow Manobos, we are still outsiders because it is not our place. ant: sakup 2. 2n Foreigner, that is, someone who resides in a country where he/she is not a citizen. Ogkohingaran to agpot kow kai to Pilipinas su sakup ka to songo ugpa-an. You are called foreigners here in the Philippines because you are subjects of another country. 3n A person who lives on someone else's property; displaced person. Ko warò tanò dan, mgo agpot sikandan. If they don't have land they are residing on someone else's land. [The Ata Manobo term agpot applies to a renter or someone who has permission to live on someone else's land. It does not have the negative connotation of the English term “squatter”. However, the people who dwell on a dump would be considered agpot because it is not considered that it is an appropriate place to live.] 4v To go somewhere for a short stay. Si Lita, nignangon ki Mery to diò oghibat to kandin. Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Lita told Mery to sleep (lit. lay down) at their place. Mery stayed a short time with them because she joined [them] for only one night. [In the following example, DB says the verbal form applies but Mary is not an agpot because she only stayed one night.] see: panumbaloy. 5n To be temporary residents of some place Mgo agpot ki rò kai to tanò. We are just resident aliens here on earth. Ko malayat ka pog-ugpò nu, sikan ka agpot su nig-amut ka. If your stay is long, that is the meaning of an resident alien because you have joined in [with those people]. [DB says the word can mean amut if it is in a temporary sense. See example. [original gloss: Mingle with.]] osyn: amut 1. 6v To stay somewhere for a short time Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Mary stayed for a short time because she joined [them] for only one night. [In this case, a person does not become an agpot “alien” or “foreigner” because the intent is just a short visit.]

magaliug 1n Visitor; guest. see fr.: panumbaloy. 2v To visit someone with a specific purpose in mind. [DB distinguishes between panumbaloy and ogmagaliug or nigmagaliug. The first is a more casual visit as to a friend one misses, whereas the latter is a visit with a specific purpose in mind.] see: panumbaloy.

sunkud see fr.: songo baloy.

abalang 1v Seek out. Ko oglapas ki, og-aliguan ta ka maralom no og-abalang ki to mababow oyow konò ki ogka-alus diò to linow. When we cross [a river], we detour around the deep [part] and seek out the shallow [area] so that we won't be swept away by the current into the deep pool. [In the following example, a person is looking for a shallow place to cross a river in order not to be swept away by the current.] 2v To relentlessly pursue; to be after something, as a purpose. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will keep on discussing it with the father until he says yes. Kagi to balu, “Og-abalangon ku ka baloy no nighimu ni Jeremy di warò pad igkabayad ku.” The widow said, “I’m after the house that Jeremy made but I don't yet have anything to use for payment.” Ko ogkalituk on ka og-abalangon din, ogbuyu-on din on. When it is clear what she is after, [then] she will ask for it. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. Og-iling ka otow, “Nokoy ka og-abalangon to asu?” The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. Someone says, “What is that dog after? [If a person requests something which isn't given the first time he will keep coming back until the person finally gives what is requested. This can apply to a young man who keeps returning to talk to the father of a girl he wants to marry or can apply to a dog who keeps digging because he smells a rat and is determined to get it.] 3v That which someone is relentlessly pursuing. Og-atangan ku ka ig-abalangi din. I am blocking that which he is relentlessly pursuing. [The following example concerned an effort to dissuade a patient from returning home before he was well enough to do so.] see: buyù 1; see fr.: tu-ud 1. 4deriv n A person who is very persistent. Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. Ogko-iling to ogkapogos ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. It's as though the person from whom he is making a request is forced [to give it]. [If one day he asks for something and you don't give it, he will keep coming back in following days to request until you give it to him.]

agap 1v To race, involving just two people. Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Two people will race [each other] to return home. Nig-a-agap ka darua. The two people were racing [each other]. 2v To race one another, esp. of three or more people. Ka sikan no ogpa-ag-agapoy, li-agan. Ogtagù to saku no ogpallaguy. Ka ogpakaponga, ian ogpakaro-og. That [word] race each other is a game. They get in sacks and run. The one who is able to finish [first] is the one who wins. Ogpa-ag-agapoy ka mgo kuddò. The horses are racing each other. [such as in a game with multiple participants or when racing horses.] 3v To chase and catch up with someone or something. Ko du-on darua no ogpalawod no ka sagboka oghun-a, og-agapan ka oghun-a. If two [people] are going downriver [by raft/canoe] and one gets ahead, the other will chase and catch up with the one which got ahead. [The term agapan “catch up” includes the components of the words gapun “chase” and ogko-umaan “overtake”.] osyn: liu 1. 4vs To be overtaken and passed so that the other person will reach a destination ahead of him/her; beaten to a destination. Ko du-on taga Maguimon no ogligkat to Patil di nig-ulì on sikandan, no du-on nasinundul no og-ulì diò to Maambago, kagi sikandin to, “Ogka-agapan ka Usì.” Ogtabak ka taga Maguimon to, “Balagad. Hun-a ka rò du-on.” If there is someone from Maguimon who is leaving from Patil but he has left to return home, and there are others who have followed later who are returning to Maambago, they will say, “Usì, you will be inadvertently passed up.” The person from Maguimon will answer, “Nevermind. You just go on ahead.” Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Kagi to sagboka, “Ko ogka-agapan ka, koykow ka ogsakaru. Two were racing to return to the house. One said, “If you happen to be beaten [to the destination], you will be the one to fetch water.”

alad 1n Fence or wall around a yard, house or garden Agad matikang woy ko masagkop, makopal woy ko manipis no igliu to baloy woy ko lama, ogkohingaranan no alad. Even if it is high or if it is short, thick or thin and surrounds a house or the yard, it is called an alad fense. [A wall around a yard or garden is not called an alabat “wall (of a house)” because by definition, an alabat requires a roof. If it is a wall that does not have a roof, it is an alad or fense.] 2v To make a fence 3v To fence something in. 4v For many to make a fense, esp. to trap wild pigs by fencing them in.

alap v 1To bring something to a destination. Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut. Just bring the fragrant soap. see fr.: ganuy 1; see fr.: baniwal 4. 1.1To take something somewhere. Ko du-on "jeep" no nasirà no awos no og-alapon diò to "shop" oyow ogdoyroyawon, songo igpaganuy rod to dangob no jeep. If there is a jeep which is broken down which need sto be taken to the shop to be repaired, it is also pulled by another jeep. spec: sakopu, utuk 1, baba, pangkul, ti-ang 1, bitbit 1, soy-ung, layap; see: hatod 2. 2To move or propel as fins move a fish through water. Ka alongaping, ian ka ogbo-ot to og-alap to lawa to sikan no ngalap. The fin by the fish's ear, that is what determines the movement (lit. carrying) of the body of that fish. 3To be carried away, as by water. Ko ogsamba, du-on baloy no ogka-alap. When [the river] floods, there are house(s) which are carried away. spec: alus 1; see fr.: anlas 3. 4To have someone to take something somewhere; send. 5(Fig) To be under someone's authority. Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 5.1(Fig) To carry a responsibility or hold authority. Si Joaquin pad ka naka-alap to katondanan to kapitanto Baranggay Gupitan. Joaquin is still the one who has held the position (lit. authority) of captain of Baranggay Gupitan. 5.1.1To be under someone's authority Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 6For something to be brought to someone. 6.1To be transmitted to, as an illness. Ko og-uma ka dalu no tiklas diò to songo ugpa-an, ko du-on ogpanumbaloy no ogligkat to sikan no ugpa-an, ogka-alapan ki to dalu. If an illness comes to some place, [and] if someone visits from that place, the illness will be transmitted (lit. inadvertantly carried) to us. see: halin 2.1. 6.2To be used in a certain way, as a word. Ian dò ogka-alapan no kinagian ko du-on duma ta no oghinggat to ogparigus no ogkagian ku to, “Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut.” The only way the word is used (lit. the only [meaning] carried by the word) is if we have a companion whom [we] invite to go bathing with us and I say, "Just bring the fragrant soap".