Search results for "batasan"

otow 1n A human being, a person. 1.1n Who is/are that person (or those people)? “Hontow otawa ka du-on no nigligad?” Nigtabak sikandan to, “Ligkat koy to Kapugi no du-on tu-ud noy diò to Patil.” “Who are [those] people who have just passed by?” They replied, “We have come from Kapugi no du-on tu-ud noy diò to Patil.” [This is a request for identity which is generally given in terms of where a person is from and other relevant information. It is generally not appropriate to request peoples’ names.] 2n An image or idol. 3vs To be born. Hondo-i ka no-otow? Where were you born? Ka mgo otow, no-otow no du-on mgo mata. As for people, they have eyes when they are born. [This term applies also to animals and other living creatures.] 3.1vs To be born in a live state, such as certain fish. Ka po-it, ka alu-an woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it fish, the mudfish and the catfish are directly born in a live state when they give birth. 4v Birth, of people or animals. Ka batò no ogko-omaw, ogligkat to pogko-otow rin taman to ogkabuyag on sikandin no omaw rod ian sikandin. As for a child who is mute, he will be mute from [the time that] he is born until he has become old (lit. it comes from his being born) until he is already old that he will still be mute.) 4.1v Age. Du-on anak noy no do-isok pad, mgo songo tu-id pad ka pogko-otow rin. We have a small child [whose] age is about one year. 4.2v One's life or manner of living. Ko og-ay-ayaran ta ka batasan ta, ogmatapid ka kanta no pogko-otow. If we are careful about our conduct, our lives will be orderly. see: batasan. 5v To be brought back to life; to revive as someone who has fainted. No-otawan on. (He) was brought back to life [from death]. [DB indicated that no-otawan is similar to no-uyag but lo-in ka tu-ud “they have a different purpose (i.e. sense)”. DB says the no-otawan “reviving/recovering [from death]” is a result of nig-uyag i.e. of God “having given life”.] osyn: uyag 2; see fr.: alimukow 2. 6v To materialize or to make an appearance as in a vision or dream, especially of spirit beings but also of people who may appear in a vision. 6.1n A vision, especially the appearance of a person or spirit in a vision or dream.

anoy₁ 1deriv n First; in the beginning. An-anayan, og-umawon nu. Ko konò oggoram, oggongonan ta oyow ogka-antog. First, you call [the sleeping person]. If he doesn't sense it (lit. feel) we take hold of him so that he will be disturbed [from sleep]. Ko du-on oghimuon ta di ko du-on igkasasow ta, na-akoban ka oghimuon ta porom no an-anayan no na-aloy ki diò to dangob no warò ta nato-ori. If we are doing something but if there is something worrying us, the thing we would have done in the beginning is supplanted (lit. layered or covered over.) And then we are distracted to something else so that we didn't accomplish [what we started out to do]. 2adv Since; ever since; from the time that something happened. Anoy ki oglibonglibong no ogtalabao no ogkapolaan ad. Since we keep going back and forth (lit. returning) to [our] work, then I am becoming weary. Anoy a no batò, warò inoy ku no nigsagman kanak woy sagboka bag ka sabinit ku. Ever since I was a [smaller] child, I haven't had a mother to attend to me and I had only one item of clothing. Anoy on no-otow si Huan, diad on ka Magboboot to pusung din su kandin ian ka nigbo-ot ki Huan no no-otow. From the time that John was born, God was in his heart because He [God] was the one who determined that John should be born. syn: aligbat 1; osyn: taan 3. 3adv After having [expected something]...then [there was an unexpected result]. Anoy no og-iman-iman to pila no bulan ka pogtagad dan to ogsanggì no warò nakasanggì. After having anticipated for how many months as they were waiting to harvest, then they were not able to harvest [after all]. [The sense here is that the end result is not that which was anticipated. ] 4adv Habitual. Napolaan ad to batasan nu no anoy kad ogkalasing. I've become tired of your conduct of habitual (lit ever since) drinking. 5deriv n Firstborn child. 5.1v To be born first.

batuk 1v To find, discover. Inat konò ogpakabatuk. It's as if one cannot discover [the meaning]. Warò ki pad makabatuk to maroyow no dalan. We had not yet discovered the good path. Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. [The mixture] is buried in the ground for two days [before]] finding [it to have become] the agkud delicacy. see fr.: tugul 3; see fr.: kita 2; see fr.: tolom 3. 2v To be effective. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever medicine is effective against an illness, that is strong medicine. 3v To identify, such as to narrow down to the one person whom one would marry. Ko konò ogkahalin ka goinawa nu diò to duma no boi, no ian nu ogbatukon ka sikan no boi no nasabutan nu. If your love (lit. breath) does not change to another girl, then you have identified the girl with whom you had an agreement [to be the one whom you would marry]. [The sense here seems to be that one's search is narrowed down to this one person so that one knows she is the one he is looking for.] see: tu-on 1. 4v To locate, or go to a specific place for a specific purpose. Ka kunto-on no tipouri no mgo otow, du-on batasan to du-on on indosanan no kasilyas no du-on dò ogbatuk ka og-indos. As for the present-day people who have come later (lit. last), there is a custom to have an outhouse for defecating and so that is [the only] place people will go to to defecate. [The following seems to mean that in contrast to the past when people defecated anywhere, now people go to only that specific location which has been made for that purpose.] 5v To find or locate Ko oglapas ki, ko konò ki ogpakabatuk to mababow su mabolbol ka woig, ogka-alus ki diò to maralom. If we cross [a river], if we cannot locate a shallow area because the water is swift, we will be carried away by the current to a deep area. 6v To get at, or be effective against, as an illness. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever the medicine is which gets at the illness, that is efficatious (lit. strong) medicine. see: tu-on ??. 7v To be passed down, as some characteristic or authority which is recognized in someone's descendant Sikan ka oghingaranan noy no batuk to anak. Ka katondanan ni Dabid, nigbatuk ki Husi. No ka katondanan ni Husi, nigbatuk man dò diò ki Hisus. That is [what] we call passed down to an offspring. The authority of David, it is passed down to Joseph. And the authority of Joseph, it is then passed down to/found in in Jesus. 8v to find to be [or to have become] something Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. That which found to be agkud is buried in the ground for two days. [In the following example, the it takes two days for the mixture of ingredients to change into the food item called akud.] 9Retrieve food once cached away. 10Return. 11v find out, reveal 12Kabatukon ku so-i komos. ???

bungkù v 1To come to an end, limit; boundary. Ko hondo-i ogkataman ka hikot to asu, du-on dò ogbungkù. Wherever the tether of the dog ends, that is where he will be limited. Du-on otow no nalagak ka salapi din no darua no gatus. Nigbungkù dò du-on to namanghò di warò din on kita-a. There was a person ho lost two hundred [pesos] of his money. He came to an end of looking for it but didn't find it. 2Give up on someone or something, as when an action proves futile Ko du-on duma ta no du-on batasan no konò ogkabalowbalow, ogbungku-an tad ka og-anad kandin to maroyow. If we have a companion who has conduct which cannot be changed, we sgive up on teaching him [to do] good. 3To run out of options, as a doctor who cannot treat an illness. Nigbungku-an on to doctor si Ann Joy. Agad ko du-on ogkoimu on dan to ogpangabang, ogkamatoy rò sikandin. The doctor gran out of options for Ann Joy. Even if there was something they could do to save her, she would still die. see: tawad 1; see: taman 1. 4To allow to go so far and no farther such as when cutting a field. Ka otow no ogkakamot, du-on patamanan din ka ogpo-ilisan ka kamot din no ian ka pabungku-an to kamot din. A person who is making a field, has an ending of the edge of his field and that is how far he will ballow his field to extend. [It may not be the boundry of his property but it is the farthest extent to which he will have his field cut.] 4.1To set a limit. Ka lubid to asu ka ogpakabungkù oyow du-on dò ogkataman. The rope is that which is setting a limit it so that it will not go any farther.

dakol phr.: Dakol ka goinawa; phr.: ian dakol. 1adj Big; large in size. Ka abu-on, dakol no manukmanuk no og-ugpò to koilawan. A heron is a big bird which lives in the forest. see fr.: pagamayan. 2adj A lot, or large amount of something Dakol ka hilamonon to homoy ni Inò Mother has a lot of weeds in her rice [field]. 2.1adj many Ko dakol ka igko-untud to gakit, ogka-agod-od on. If many [people] get on a raft, it will become submerged. 2.2adj lot, or large amount of something. Ko dakol ka urang, ogkaponù ka luang to balutu. If there is a lot of rain, the interior of the boat will become full [of water]. 3adv Profuse. Dakol ka pogpasalamat ku ki Joaquin ka nigpangabangan a rin. My expressions of thanks to Joaquin were profuse for his having saved me. [DB says he would have expressed his thanks in words -- it implies many but also includes the emotion of joy.] 4adv Very much. Ka bogas to katumbal, dakol no ogpakabulig ko du-on turakan ta no agoloy no ogtasikan. [As for] the fruit of the red pepper, it helps very much if we have a corn field which has a tasikan blight/disease. see: lagboy 1. 5adj Forceful. No ko oghulid sikandan, ogdagsangan to dakol no lugung woy kilat. And then when they laid down next to each other [to sleep], they were struck by a forceful [clap] of thunder and lightning. see: agbot 2. 6v To increase, do something in greater measure; excessively. Ognangonan ta ka magaliug ta to, “Pango-on ka; hinalatoy ka,” oyow ogdakol ka ogko-onon din. We tell our guest, “Eat up; fill up”, so that he will eat more (lit. increase his eating). Nigdakol ka uran gabi-i su napawa-an no warò pad nigtilo-tò. It rained excessively yesterday because [it rained] all night until morning without stopping. 7v To increase Ogdakolon ta ka homoy to og-angoy diò to pinayag su ogka-atangan ki to oglanog ka Liboganon. We will increase [the amount of] rice which we fetch from the rice shelter because we will be blocked by the swollen Liboganon [river]. 8v To do something in great measure, such as to give a large amount of something. Bogayi nu si Tunin to homoy woy dakola nu to ogbogoy. Give Tunin some rice and give her a large amount [of rice]. see: timul. 9adj very large Ka ogbobol-og, ogpamusil to babuy no magintalunan, usa, ubal, ko manukmanuk no dagdakol. Those who go hunting with a weapon, they shoot wild pigs, deer, monkey(s), or very large birds. 10adj Forceful, very heavy (lit. very big), as rain Wà dò malugoy, nigdagsang ka ma-agbot no kilat woy lugung woy daddakol no uran. Not long later, a loud crack of lightning and thunder struck along with very heavy (lit. very big) rain. 11adj Very big; biggest Ka takubung, ngaran to ambow no daddakol no lukosan. Takubung is the name of the biggest of the male rodents. 12adj Bigger Dakoldakol ka lumansad no kalusisi to boian. The male love bird is bigger than the female. 13v Increase see: timul. 14Bigger, biggest, larger, largest. 15n Size, measurement Nigsokoran ku ka hawak to batò oyow ogkatagaan ku ka karakoli to hawak din. I measured the child's waist so that I would know the measurement of her waist. 16v To exalt, oneself or someone else. Maro-ot sikandin no ogpakabulig no igparakol ka batasan din. Maroyow poron ko duma no mgo otow ka ogparakol to ngaran din. That person is bad who has helped and then uses it to exalt his own conduct. It would be good if someone else was the one to exalt his name. 17To exalt oneself Ko ogparakoldakol ki to duma ta, sikan dod, songo og-ampow-ampow ki to duma ta. Ogdo-isokon ta ka duma ta. If we exalt ourselves over our companions, that is also, the same as making ourselves higher than our companions.

ibog 1n A strong desire or craving for something. Ka miow, ko ogdatong ka ibog dan to lukos no ungud ogmasamuk ka ogmiawmiaw su sikan ka batasan to miow ko ogko-ibog to ogpa-anak. DB Dic Nt May/2006 As for a cat, when it's craving for a male [cat] arrives, it noisily miows because that is the conduct of a cat when it craves to have offspring. 2vs To be thirsty. Ogbuyù a to woig su ogko-ibog a. I’m asking for water because I am thirsty. see fr.: laklakalan. 3vs To stongly desire something such as to be hungry for some specific food or for merchandise in a store. Purut ka. Alam ka to ogko-ibogan nu. Take something. Choose that which you are hungry for (lit. which is craved by you). Ko nokoy ka ogko-ibogan din, ogbolion. Whatever he/she strongly desires, [he/she] buys it. 3.1vs (With negative)To not have an appetite or desire for food. Du-on allow no konò ki ogko-ibog. Og-alam ki to ogko-ibogan ta. There are days when we don’t have an appetite. We choose what we desire [to eat]. 3.2v To strongly crave for something such as a pregnant woman who craves for a particular food. Du-on ka iam no alunggun, ko ogpangiram ka boi, ogko-ibog-ibog to bogas to mangga no ogpogos to iglukos din to ogpakuò to mangga. Mangkuan ko du-on on, konad ogko-ibogan. There was a newly [married] couple, [and] when the woman was in the beginning of pregancy, she strongly craved the mango fruit and so she forced her spouce to get a mango [for her]. Later, when it was already there she was no longer hungry for it.

ko-on phr.: songo pogko-on. 1v Eat. 2v Eat up! Ognangonan ta to, “Pango-on ka” oyow ogdakol ka ogko-onon din [This is said to a new guest who is shy to take very much food.] 3v To have plenty to eat. Ognangonnangon on to mgo duma rin to dio to Nasuli, mako-onon atag kandan no kai to kanta, moirap ki to ogkako-on. He will tell his companions that at Nasuli, they have plenty to eat in contrast to us here who have a difficult time eating. Ka mako-on, oglituk to dakol ka ogkako-on kai to Nasuli woy to warò bitil. The [word] mako-on means that what is eaten is plentiful here at Nasuli and there is no famine. ant: bitil 1. 4v Many have begun to eat 5v (Of a group) To be in the process of eating. Pananglitan, ko nanumbaloy a, nakasalangan a to ogko-on, kagi a to, “Ogmangoko-on kow na-an.” For example, if I have gone to visit [someone, and] I happen to arrive as they are eating, I will say, “So you are in the process of eating. ” 6v To avail oneself of an opportunity to eat [at someone else's house]. Ko ogpakapango-on ka anak ku diò to songo baloy no warò nigpataga kanak to nigko-on, og-ogotan ku. If my child avails himself/herself of an opportunity to eat at someone else's house, I will scold him/her. 7vs to be edible; can be eaten Ko konò kow ogtamong, pamanghò kow to ogkako-on." If you won't take care [of the children], go look [elsewhere] for something to eat! Ko ogkapongaan to poghimu to darua no allow, bali ogkako-on ka sikan no agkud. When two days of [this] process has been completed, finally that agkud is edible (lit. can be eaten). [The non-intentive form of the word implies eating anything edible, not just rice or a staple. The nominalized or objective form of the verb generally understood to refer to rice or a staple.] 8 9v To be in the process of eating. Kagi to magaliug, “Warò batasan ku to og-alukuy to ogko-onko-on a.” A guest said, “It isn't my custom to carry on a discussion while I am in the process of eating. 10Feed (lit. cause to eat). 11v To feed someone. 12A staple food, esp. rice, dried grains or sweet potatoes. 13Eating place.

sabandal 1n A person who lacks good manners. Ka [sabandal, ian] igngaran to otow no warò batasan. Pangagikagi rò du-on to konò no maroyow. A person who is uncouth acts inappropriately is what a person is called who doesn’t have [good] manners. He just chatters [things] which arent good. [DB says this describes a person who is undisciplined and who just chatters about things that aren't good.] 2v To speak or act inappropriately and/or disrespectfully. Konò ka ogsasabandal diò to songo baloy. Don't act inappropriately over at someone's house. [DB says a person who does this scolds those who are around him, takes things without asking and just acts inappropriately or disrespectfully such as one who helps himself to food without asking. However, it is customary at a death feast to help oneself to food withiout asking since evil spirits are assumed to be present. ] see fr.: abusu.