Search results for "end"

anak phr.: anak to dalan; phr.: anak to pamubungon. 1n A male or female offspring of an animal or human; son or daughter. 2v To give birth. Ko ogkapanoy ogkatapid ka batò diò to diralom to gotok, oglomulan ka inoy ko og-anak. If the baby (lit. child) in the abdomen has been properly positioned ahead of time, the mother will have it easier when she gives birth. Gabi-i pad nig-anak on ka kuddò ku. Just yesterday my horse gave birth. cf: agud. 2.1v To give birth in some place. - Ogdurugmun ka babuy to og-anakan din. A pig makes a bed for [a place where] she will give birth. 2.2v To give birth to multiple offspring. Ka karpa no ngalap, woy ogpanganak ko ogsilò ka bulan. Carp fish don’t give birth to multiple offspring until the moon comes out. 2.2.1v To give birth multiple times; give birth frequently. Ko du-on og-anak no warò pad nigtu-ig ka anak din no ogpanganak man dò sikandin, oghingaranan no mahariharion no manggianak su malasi og-anak. If someone gives birth when her child is not yet a year old so she is giving birth again, she is called a mother who produces siblings [one after another] because she frequently gives birth. 2.2.2v To reach birthing time. Ko du-on og-insò ko kon-u nanganak ka amboy nu, kagi to songo otow, “Ka ligad dò no allow ka pogpanganak.” If someone asks when your daughter-in-law delivered [her baby], another person will answer, “The previous day was her birthing time”. 2.2.3v Those which are birthed. Ka po-it, ka alu-an, woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it, mudfish and the catfish, are birthed alive (lit. directly live, when it is the time for them to be born [lit. the ones being birthed]. 3deriv n Uterus Ka a-anakan, sikan ka ugpa-an to batò diò gotok to inoy. The uterus, that is the dwelling place of the child in the abdomen of the mother. 4deriv n An adopted child. Ogko-iling ki Ugalinga no nig-uyamu to mgo batò, ogkoimu no anak-anak ran. It’s like Ugalinga who is caring from the childen, they have become heir adopted children. see: uyamuan. 4.1deriv n A stepchild. [A stepchild, that is the child of one's spouse is an anak-anak but not considered to be an uyamuan which is used of an adopted or foster child] 5deriv n Nephew or neice, also a cousin’s child. Si Binitu, songo maka-amung ku rod su anakon ku si Angelina. As for Binitu, he has also become my son-in-law because Angelina is my neice. 6deriv n Anything that has a young offspring; a mother, but especially a nursing mother. Ka mgo ngalap to woig no poit maroyow ka sabow rin to duon iam no manggi-anak su oggatasan. As for the po-it fish [lit. creatures of the water which are po-it], its soup is good for the nursing mother because [her breasts] will produce milk . [Also applies to female animals with young.] 6.1vs To become a nursing mother. Ka ogkamanggi-anak on no boi, sikan ka iam nig-anak no du-on on ogtago-uro-on no batò. Sikan ka ungod din oggibo-on, ogpasusuon, ogsakopuon woy og-uahon. A woman who has become a nursing mother, that is the one who has has newly given birth and now has a a child to care for. [Also applies to female animals who newly give birth] 7deriv n Parent and child doing something together; from parent’s standpoint. 8deriv n A child accompanied by his/her parent or parent accompanying his/her child. Ka tag-anak, ka amoy nigduruma to anak din. A child accompanied by its father, [that is when] the father has accompanied his son/daughter (lit. offspring). Ka amoy no nighondiò to lunsud, tag-anak ka nigduruma to du-on ogbolion dan diò to lunsud. The father who went to town, they are the child with his parent who accompanied each other to buy [something] in town. 8.1n A mother and her child. 9deriv v To hunt for frogs by searching for the frog eggs. Ogpaki-anak ki. We search for the offspring [of frogs]. Ogpakianak ki, ko ogkita ki to atolug to bakbak, du-on ta rò ogpamitawon ka inoy su du-on dò ian to marani ka og-olon. When we hunt for frogs, when we see the eggs of the frog, we will just find the mother [frog] because she will be there closely watching over [her eggs]. 10n Descendent of recent past [That is, descendants who were known andcan be recounted by one’s relatives in contrast to kapunganan which would refer to decendants a long time removed.] see: kapunganan 1.

Banlak n One of three original Ata siblings (two men and their sister) said to have ascended into heaven. According to legend, they gathered kout along the Kapalong river which were turned into white stones. (see Ibul, Boyboy), lived on, believed to have created people, did many miracles. [The Ata Manobo kout refers to a poisonous, starchy root something like cassava which must be soaked before cooking to make it edible.] see: Boybayan; gen: minuna.

bungkù v 1To come to an end, limit; boundary. Ko hondo-i ogkataman ka hikot to asu, du-on dò ogbungkù. Wherever the tether of the dog ends, that is where he will be limited. Du-on otow no nalagak ka salapi din no darua no gatus. Nigbungkù dò du-on to namanghò di warò din on kita-a. There was a person ho lost two hundred [pesos] of his money. He came to an end of looking for it but didn't find it. 2Give up on someone or something, as when an action proves futile Ko du-on duma ta no du-on batasan no konò ogkabalowbalow, ogbungku-an tad ka og-anad kandin to maroyow. If we have a companion who has conduct which cannot be changed, we sgive up on teaching him [to do] good. 3To run out of options, as a doctor who cannot treat an illness. Nigbungku-an on to doctor si Ann Joy. Agad ko du-on ogkoimu on dan to ogpangabang, ogkamatoy rò sikandin. The doctor gran out of options for Ann Joy. Even if there was something they could do to save her, she would still die. see: tawad 1; see: taman 1. 4To allow to go so far and no farther such as when cutting a field. Ka otow no ogkakamot, du-on patamanan din ka ogpo-ilisan ka kamot din no ian ka pabungku-an to kamot din. A person who is making a field, has an ending of the edge of his field and that is how far he will ballow his field to extend. [It may not be the boundry of his property but it is the farthest extent to which he will have his field cut.] 4.1To set a limit. Ka lubid to asu ka ogpakabungkù oyow du-on dò ogkataman. The rope is that which is setting a limit it so that it will not go any farther.

dangag v To attend a spirit ceremony held by a shaman. Ka otow no ogdangag to bailan, og-amut sikandan ka ogpamminog ko nokoy ka ignangonnangon to bailan kandan. People who attend a spirit ceremony of a shaman, meet together as they listen to whatever the shaman is telling them. [The shaman will often go into a trnce and then report to the people what the spirits are saying. Singing of epic songs such as a tutulalang are often done while people are together but is not actually part of the ceremony.]

kalusisi n 1Small red-breasted parrot resembling a “love bird” [This is a small, green parrot similar to a “love bird”. Both have red cheeks. The female has a red head and beak. The male, referred to as the datù, has a green top notch, a red breast and red feathers on his back.] see fr.: uranda 2. 2A girlfriend, or boyfriend [DB says they have not yet decided to get married but they like each other So the term "boyfriend" or "girlfriend" would apply. However However, they would be embarrassed if someone referred to their relationship in such terms. X]

kapunganan n 1One’s posterity, decendent. [Ocring said in his dialect kapunganan would refer to descendents a long time removed; pinanganak would be used of more immediate descendents.] see: pinanganak; see fr.: anak 10. 2A physical characteristic which is passed down from one generation to the next, such as a malady or outgrowth of the body. [DB says that if a disease or physical malady such as swelling of the knees is is experienced by another generation people will say that is kapungan ta -- that is, they conceive that it has been passed down. (DB 21/Jan/2006)]

korow n Knotted rattan used as calendar, appointment reminder. Ka korow, sikan ka ogbukuon no balagon. Kara buku, songo allow. Ko sambulù no buku ka igtugun, sampulù no allow. The knotted rattan “calendar”, that is a knotted [piece of] rattan. Each knot [represents] one day. If ten knots are used to call [someone], it [indicates] ten days. [The traditional way for Manobo people to keep track of time, especially concerning agreements to meet somewhere is to take two pieces of rattan and make an equal number of knots in each representing the number of days until the day of the meeting. If a debt is owed and a piece of red material is included with the first knot, the meaning is that if the debt is not paid by that last day, someone will be killed.]

pokù see fr.: dungkù 2. 1v To bend, as a wire or green rattan or a person\'s back when one ages. [Applies to something, as wire, which is bent. A bent can is nakomit. A bend in a river or path is tikù.] see fr.: buyukut 2; spec: bulukù; see fr.: kurung 2. 2v To lie curled up, as person or animal. syn: bulukù. 3v 4Konò ogkapokù. It can’t be bent.