Search results for "find"

batuk 1v To find, discover. Inat konò ogpakabatuk. It's as if one cannot discover [the meaning]. Warò ki pad makabatuk to maroyow no dalan. We had not yet discovered the good path. Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. [The mixture] is buried in the ground for two days [before]] finding [it to have become] the agkud delicacy. see fr.: tugul 3; see fr.: kita 2; see fr.: tolom 3. 2v To be effective. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever medicine is effective against an illness, that is strong medicine. 3v To identify, such as to narrow down to the one person whom one would marry. Ko konò ogkahalin ka goinawa nu diò to duma no boi, no ian nu ogbatukon ka sikan no boi no nasabutan nu. If your love (lit. breath) does not change to another girl, then you have identified the girl with whom you had an agreement [to be the one whom you would marry]. [The sense here seems to be that one's search is narrowed down to this one person so that one knows she is the one he is looking for.] see: tu-on 1. 4v To locate, or go to a specific place for a specific purpose. Ka kunto-on no tipouri no mgo otow, du-on batasan to du-on on indosanan no kasilyas no du-on dò ogbatuk ka og-indos. As for the present-day people who have come later (lit. last), there is a custom to have an outhouse for defecating and so that is [the only] place people will go to to defecate. [The following seems to mean that in contrast to the past when people defecated anywhere, now people go to only that specific location which has been made for that purpose.] 5v To find or locate Ko oglapas ki, ko konò ki ogpakabatuk to mababow su mabolbol ka woig, ogka-alus ki diò to maralom. If we cross [a river], if we cannot locate a shallow area because the water is swift, we will be carried away by the current to a deep area. 6v To get at, or be effective against, as an illness. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever the medicine is which gets at the illness, that is efficatious (lit. strong) medicine. see: tu-on ??. 7v To be passed down, as some characteristic or authority which is recognized in someone's descendant Sikan ka oghingaranan noy no batuk to anak. Ka katondanan ni Dabid, nigbatuk ki Husi. No ka katondanan ni Husi, nigbatuk man dò diò ki Hisus. That is [what] we call passed down to an offspring. The authority of David, it is passed down to Joseph. And the authority of Joseph, it is then passed down to/found in in Jesus. 8v to find to be [or to have become] something Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. That which found to be agkud is buried in the ground for two days. [In the following example, the it takes two days for the mixture of ingredients to change into the food item called akud.] 9Retrieve food once cached away. 10Return. 11v find out, reveal 12Kabatukon ku so-i komos. ???

dalangin 1vt To run an errand find out something, such as whether one can buy newly butchered meat. Ko du-on og-iow to babuy, kalabow, kuddò ogsugù koy to, "Dalangin kow su du-on nangiow to babuy. Purut kow to agad songo kilo." If someone is butchering a pig, water buffalo, [or] horse, we will command someone, “Go check it out because someone has butchered a pig. Get even one kilo.” see: lo-uy 2; see: ma-an 2. 2vi To be en route to go to a destination as an evil spirit which is en route to check out a dead person. Konò kow amana ogli-ag diò to tanò su ogkabaya-an kow to busow no ogdalangin to namatoy. Don't play so much outside (lit. on the ground) because you will happen to be in the path of evil spirit(s) which are en route to check out a dead person. 3v [For many people] to check something out Ko du-on og-iow, moon-ing ka oghondu-on ka ogdalanginan. If there is [an animal] being butchered, many go to check it out. 4v To delegate someone to do something. Kunto-on, to warò liwak nu to oghondiò to Malaybalay, nigdalanginan ta si Jaimi su du-on tu-ud din diò to Malaybalay no ian ta pinaboli to mgo gulayon. Today, since you didn’t have time to go to Malaybalay, we delegated Jaimi to do it [for us] because he had a purpose in Malaybalay and so we had him buy the food items. see: pagindalan; see: saligan. 5v To be pursued, as by evil spirits who want the game that a person is carrying. Ogdanginan ka otow to busow no ogbababa to babuy su ogngarog to langosa. A person who is carrying a pig on his back will be pursued by an evil spirit because it smells the blood. [Said to happen if one is carrying a pig after dark or when the light outside is dim because the spirit(s) are after the blood of the animal because it wants to take the animal away from the person. It is believed that the enounter may result in that person becoming ill.]

ma-an v 1To become familiar with as a friend. Kama-anan ta. We will find out [about something]. [DB says that the above form and meaning is Dibabawon. But Ata Manobo would say something like, Katagaanan ta ka nokoy ka ignangon din. “We will find out what he will tell us.”] 2To find out about something. Ko oglogsad ka ariplanu diò to Maambago, moon-ing ka mgo otow no ogma-anma-an ko hontow ka inlonò no magaliug. No sikan ian to ogtagataga sikandan ka ogtagbu. When the airplane lands in Maambago, many people come to find out what guests have arrived. So that’s why they come to find out. [By asking or going personally to find out about something.] see fr.: dalangin 1; see: tagataga.

mata phr.: mata to ubud; phr.: mata to aldow (poet.). 1n Eye. Ko warò ka mata to lawa ta, konò ki ogkita to ka-awangan to kalibutan woy to kausiloman. If our bodies didn't have eyes, we could not see the light of the earth or night. 2v To wake. Ogpakoro-korò ki to kiloy ta ko sikan ki pad nighimata. We wrinkle our eyebrows when we first awaken. Ka otow no warò nakagimata no nig-onow, nigtalam sikandin. A person who gets up without awaking, he is sleep-walking. [To awaken someone else is pukow.] 3State a baby finds itself in immediately after birth. Ka iam no in-anak ka batò, ian din nagimata-an ka ka-awangan to kalibutan. As for the child who is newly birthed, what awakened him is the light of the world. 4To be awakened by something. Ka amoy, ian din nagimata-an ka anak din no ungod ogsinogow. As for the father, that which awakened him was the child who was always crying. Dic Nt 24/Aug/2006 5To see but not take notice; or to watch without lifting a finger to help. Ka du-on nalonod diò to pool, moon-ing kandan ka namataan no warò nakapangabang. Natonongan no warò nokowo-il. When there was someone who drowned at the pool, there were many people who saw but didn't go to therescue. They ignored it and didn't move. Ka an-anayan no nigkita nu ka batò diò to woig, namataan ka pad. Hongkai no nabalikid ka batò, warò ka namatoi su naragap nud on. [The reasons for the above could be that one is lazy or doesn't care, but in the case of a small child that entered the water, the person was initially unaware of an emergency.] ant: sagman 1; see: tonongan.

anak phr.: anak to dalan; phr.: anak to pamubungon. 1n A male or female offspring of an animal or human; son or daughter. 2v To give birth. Ko ogkapanoy ogkatapid ka batò diò to diralom to gotok, oglomulan ka inoy ko og-anak. If the baby (lit. child) in the abdomen has been properly positioned ahead of time, the mother will have it easier when she gives birth. Gabi-i pad nig-anak on ka kuddò ku. Just yesterday my horse gave birth. cf: agud. 2.1v To give birth in some place. - Ogdurugmun ka babuy to og-anakan din. A pig makes a bed for [a place where] she will give birth. 2.2v To give birth to multiple offspring. Ka karpa no ngalap, woy ogpanganak ko ogsilò ka bulan. Carp fish don’t give birth to multiple offspring until the moon comes out. 2.2.1v To give birth multiple times; give birth frequently. Ko du-on og-anak no warò pad nigtu-ig ka anak din no ogpanganak man dò sikandin, oghingaranan no mahariharion no manggianak su malasi og-anak. If someone gives birth when her child is not yet a year old so she is giving birth again, she is called a mother who produces siblings [one after another] because she frequently gives birth. 2.2.2v To reach birthing time. Ko du-on og-insò ko kon-u nanganak ka amboy nu, kagi to songo otow, “Ka ligad dò no allow ka pogpanganak.” If someone asks when your daughter-in-law delivered [her baby], another person will answer, “The previous day was her birthing time”. 2.2.3v Those which are birthed. Ka po-it, ka alu-an, woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it, mudfish and the catfish, are birthed alive (lit. directly live, when it is the time for them to be born [lit. the ones being birthed]. 3deriv n Uterus Ka a-anakan, sikan ka ugpa-an to batò diò gotok to inoy. The uterus, that is the dwelling place of the child in the abdomen of the mother. 4deriv n An adopted child. Ogko-iling ki Ugalinga no nig-uyamu to mgo batò, ogkoimu no anak-anak ran. It’s like Ugalinga who is caring from the childen, they have become heir adopted children. see: uyamuan. 4.1deriv n A stepchild. [A stepchild, that is the child of one's spouse is an anak-anak but not considered to be an uyamuan which is used of an adopted or foster child] 5deriv n Nephew or neice, also a cousin’s child. Si Binitu, songo maka-amung ku rod su anakon ku si Angelina. As for Binitu, he has also become my son-in-law because Angelina is my neice. 6deriv n Anything that has a young offspring; a mother, but especially a nursing mother. Ka mgo ngalap to woig no poit maroyow ka sabow rin to duon iam no manggi-anak su oggatasan. As for the po-it fish [lit. creatures of the water which are po-it], its soup is good for the nursing mother because [her breasts] will produce milk . [Also applies to female animals with young.] 6.1vs To become a nursing mother. Ka ogkamanggi-anak on no boi, sikan ka iam nig-anak no du-on on ogtago-uro-on no batò. Sikan ka ungod din oggibo-on, ogpasusuon, ogsakopuon woy og-uahon. A woman who has become a nursing mother, that is the one who has has newly given birth and now has a a child to care for. [Also applies to female animals who newly give birth] 7deriv n Parent and child doing something together; from parent’s standpoint. 8deriv n A child accompanied by his/her parent or parent accompanying his/her child. Ka tag-anak, ka amoy nigduruma to anak din. A child accompanied by its father, [that is when] the father has accompanied his son/daughter (lit. offspring). Ka amoy no nighondiò to lunsud, tag-anak ka nigduruma to du-on ogbolion dan diò to lunsud. The father who went to town, they are the child with his parent who accompanied each other to buy [something] in town. 8.1n A mother and her child. 9deriv v To hunt for frogs by searching for the frog eggs. Ogpaki-anak ki. We search for the offspring [of frogs]. Ogpakianak ki, ko ogkita ki to atolug to bakbak, du-on ta rò ogpamitawon ka inoy su du-on dò ian to marani ka og-olon. When we hunt for frogs, when we see the eggs of the frog, we will just find the mother [frog] because she will be there closely watching over [her eggs]. 10n Descendent of recent past [That is, descendants who were known andcan be recounted by one’s relatives in contrast to kapunganan which would refer to decendants a long time removed.] see: kapunganan 1.

bungkù v 1To come to an end, limit; boundary. Ko hondo-i ogkataman ka hikot to asu, du-on dò ogbungkù. Wherever the tether of the dog ends, that is where he will be limited. Du-on otow no nalagak ka salapi din no darua no gatus. Nigbungkù dò du-on to namanghò di warò din on kita-a. There was a person ho lost two hundred [pesos] of his money. He came to an end of looking for it but didn't find it. 2Give up on someone or something, as when an action proves futile Ko du-on duma ta no du-on batasan no konò ogkabalowbalow, ogbungku-an tad ka og-anad kandin to maroyow. If we have a companion who has conduct which cannot be changed, we sgive up on teaching him [to do] good. 3To run out of options, as a doctor who cannot treat an illness. Nigbungku-an on to doctor si Ann Joy. Agad ko du-on ogkoimu on dan to ogpangabang, ogkamatoy rò sikandin. The doctor gran out of options for Ann Joy. Even if there was something they could do to save her, she would still die. see: tawad 1; see: taman 1. 4To allow to go so far and no farther such as when cutting a field. Ka otow no ogkakamot, du-on patamanan din ka ogpo-ilisan ka kamot din no ian ka pabungku-an to kamot din. A person who is making a field, has an ending of the edge of his field and that is how far he will ballow his field to extend. [It may not be the boundry of his property but it is the farthest extent to which he will have his field cut.] 4.1To set a limit. Ka lubid to asu ka ogpakabungkù oyow du-on dò ogkataman. The rope is that which is setting a limit it so that it will not go any farther.

tomu 1v To connect, come together, as fields Ko nigkamot ka diò limang to bubungan no nakagomow kad diò to songo du-on kamot, nokoglawang ka olin kamot. Nokogtomu on. If you cut a field on the other side of a mountain and go up over the top [where] there is another field, the fields joined each other. They have come together. see fr.: lawang 3. 2v To come together; to meet at a certain place from different directions Ko du-on “meeting”, ogpokogtomutomu ka mgo otow no pakitkito-oy. When there is a meeting, [many] people come together and see each other. 3v To meet. Ko du-on otow no ogpanumbaloy no ligkat to Kapalong, ogpatomu kanta diò to babalakan oyow ogpoko-untul to baloy ta oyow konò ogkalagaklagak. If there is someone who will come from Kapalong for a visit, [he] will have us meet him at the junction [of ??] so that he can find our house so that he won't get lost. osyn: tagbu; see: tagbu. 4v To join something together, such as fields Warò dan pogtomua to pogkamot. They didn't join [the fields] by cutting. 5v Come together (to fight) [come at each other ???] Si Dabid woy si Goliat, nigpatomtomuoy ko nigpo-og-ogotoy David and Goliath, they came at each other when they fought each other. see: po-og-ogotoy. 6Wà dod nigtotomu ka bokog. The bones [on baby’s head] haven’t grown together yet. 7v herald?? Talagtomu ka limukon. The dove is a herald [that someone is coming]. [The dove is the herald/one who brings people together?? (A dove call in front of one indicates he will meet someone coming from the opposite direction.)] 8v To come alongside. Ko mabogat ka og-alapon to duma ta, ogtomuon ta to ogbulig. If our companion is carrying something heavy, we will come alongside to help. [In the following example, the ones wanting to help are moving toward the one to be helped. The helpee is not moving toward the helpers.]