Search results for "gabà"

pangabaga 1n a spokesperson or representative of a higher leader Pangabaga a nu; igkarua a nu no igbuyag. “You are my master/leader; you are my second leader.” Kagi to songo otow, “Uripon ka na-an nikandin.” Ogtabak a to, “Ho-o ian su pangabaga a rin.” One person says, “You are his slave after all..” I will respond, “Yes indeed because I am his pangabaga “representative” (??). [DB said it is like this person has been ordered by his leader then he is recognized by the people as their leader because he carries the authority of his leader. DB also said pogbuyagon is now being used more in the mountains to refer to a leader.; DB said that this representative has been ordered by his [own] leader. Then the people will recognize the representative as their leader. He also said that pogbuyagon is now being used more upriver.] 2 3 4 5 6

busung 1n A curse. gaba see fr.: gabà; see: gamut 2. 2v To curse someone. 3vt To be cursed. Konò ki ogbaloybaloy to mgo boi. Ogbusungon ki. Let's not take up residence with women. We will be cursed. [This may be a result of being angry at an elderly person or may be a result of bad morals as in the following example.] see: tunlun; see: panungayow 1; see: tunlapay; see: kulap 1.

bulig₂ deriv.: binuligay. v To help. see fr.: ganti 1; see: pangabang 4.

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

anad 1v Teach. Ka maistra, og-anad to mgo istudianti. [As for] the teacher, he/she teaches the students. see fr.: ayat 2. 1.1v Taught Ka maistra ku to "grade one", sikan dod ka nig-anad ki Judith. My grade one teacher was also the one who taught Judith. 1.2vt To be taught by someone. Og-anaron ka mgo batò oyow du-on ogkato-uanan dan. The children are being taught so that they will have skills. 2v To be able to teach. Warò a nig-iman-iman to ogka-anad ku ka amoy woy ka anak. I had not expected that I would be able to teach the father and the daughter (lit. offspring). 2.1v To train or submit oneself to training (lit. allow oneself to be taught). Ka sikan no ogpo-omot to pa-anad, ogkato-u sikandin. That person who diligently trains (lit. causes [himself] to be taught) will become skilled. 2.2v That which is used to teach/train others. Ko nato-uan din, songo ig-anad din to songo otow. When he has become skilled, he will likewise use [that skill] to teach another person. 2.2.1v That which was taught, or used to train someone. Ogkaroromdom ku ka in-anad to amoy ku kanak tongod to talabau to oggabas to kayu no ighimu to baloy I remember that which my father taught me about the work of sawing wood to make a house. 3v Learn. Ka mgo batò, og-anad to ogsulat. The children are learning to write. 3.1vs To learn, become accustomed to. Kanokal ka to oghusud oyow ogka-anad ka oyow du-on ogkato-uan nu to oggabas. Be strong to pull [on the saw] so that you will learn so that you will know how to saw. 4v That which would be used to teach/train someone to do something. 5vs To have learned or to have become trained, accustomed to. Ko na-anad ka, du-on dayagang nu woy malomu nu su nigtagama nu. When you have become trained, you have strength and it is easy for you because you have become accustomed [to the work]. Warò koy na-anad to sikan no du-on ngalap. Na-anad koy to warò ngangalapoy noy. We are not accustomed to those kinds of fish [lit. viand]. We are accustomed to having no [means of catching] fish. see: tagam. 6v 7deriv n Teacher or the ones who teach. Ka maistra woy ka maistru, sikandan ka talag-anad to mgo istudianti. The male-teacher and female teacher(s), they are the teachers of the students [In the school context, the Spanish borrowings maistru and maistra are commonly used for “teacher” but talag-anad is still used for those who teach how to do anything.] 8Learn. 9v To enable someone gain the ability (lit. to learn) to do something such as to regain a skill that has been lost due to illness. Ogbuligan ta ka otow no malotoy to ogkitkit oyow ogpaka-anad to oghihipanow oyow ogpoko-orol on. We help a weak person by holding [his/her] hand so that [he/she] will gain the ability to walk so that [he/she] will be able to become ambulatory.

bungkù v 1To come to an end, limit; boundary. Ko hondo-i ogkataman ka hikot to asu, du-on dò ogbungkù. Wherever the tether of the dog ends, that is where he will be limited. Du-on otow no nalagak ka salapi din no darua no gatus. Nigbungkù dò du-on to namanghò di warò din on kita-a. There was a person ho lost two hundred [pesos] of his money. He came to an end of looking for it but didn't find it. 2Give up on someone or something, as when an action proves futile Ko du-on duma ta no du-on batasan no konò ogkabalowbalow, ogbungku-an tad ka og-anad kandin to maroyow. If we have a companion who has conduct which cannot be changed, we sgive up on teaching him [to do] good. 3To run out of options, as a doctor who cannot treat an illness. Nigbungku-an on to doctor si Ann Joy. Agad ko du-on ogkoimu on dan to ogpangabang, ogkamatoy rò sikandin. The doctor gran out of options for Ann Joy. Even if there was something they could do to save her, she would still die. see: tawad 1; see: taman 1. 4To allow to go so far and no farther such as when cutting a field. Ka otow no ogkakamot, du-on patamanan din ka ogpo-ilisan ka kamot din no ian ka pabungku-an to kamot din. A person who is making a field, has an ending of the edge of his field and that is how far he will ballow his field to extend. [It may not be the boundry of his property but it is the farthest extent to which he will have his field cut.] 4.1To set a limit. Ka lubid to asu ka ogpakabungkù oyow du-on dò ogkataman. The rope is that which is setting a limit it so that it will not go any farther.

dakol phr.: Dakol ka goinawa; phr.: ian dakol. 1adj Big; large in size. Ka abu-on, dakol no manukmanuk no og-ugpò to koilawan. A heron is a big bird which lives in the forest. see fr.: pagamayan. 2adj A lot, or large amount of something Dakol ka hilamonon to homoy ni Inò Mother has a lot of weeds in her rice [field]. 2.1adj many Ko dakol ka igko-untud to gakit, ogka-agod-od on. If many [people] get on a raft, it will become submerged. 2.2adj lot, or large amount of something. Ko dakol ka urang, ogkaponù ka luang to balutu. If there is a lot of rain, the interior of the boat will become full [of water]. 3adv Profuse. Dakol ka pogpasalamat ku ki Joaquin ka nigpangabangan a rin. My expressions of thanks to Joaquin were profuse for his having saved me. [DB says he would have expressed his thanks in words -- it implies many but also includes the emotion of joy.] 4adv Very much. Ka bogas to katumbal, dakol no ogpakabulig ko du-on turakan ta no agoloy no ogtasikan. [As for] the fruit of the red pepper, it helps very much if we have a corn field which has a tasikan blight/disease. see: lagboy 1. 5adj Forceful. No ko oghulid sikandan, ogdagsangan to dakol no lugung woy kilat. And then when they laid down next to each other [to sleep], they were struck by a forceful [clap] of thunder and lightning. see: agbot 2. 6v To increase, do something in greater measure; excessively. Ognangonan ta ka magaliug ta to, “Pango-on ka; hinalatoy ka,” oyow ogdakol ka ogko-onon din. We tell our guest, “Eat up; fill up”, so that he will eat more (lit. increase his eating). Nigdakol ka uran gabi-i su napawa-an no warò pad nigtilo-tò. It rained excessively yesterday because [it rained] all night until morning without stopping. 7v To increase Ogdakolon ta ka homoy to og-angoy diò to pinayag su ogka-atangan ki to oglanog ka Liboganon. We will increase [the amount of] rice which we fetch from the rice shelter because we will be blocked by the swollen Liboganon [river]. 8v To do something in great measure, such as to give a large amount of something. Bogayi nu si Tunin to homoy woy dakola nu to ogbogoy. Give Tunin some rice and give her a large amount [of rice]. see: timul. 9adj very large Ka ogbobol-og, ogpamusil to babuy no magintalunan, usa, ubal, ko manukmanuk no dagdakol. Those who go hunting with a weapon, they shoot wild pigs, deer, monkey(s), or very large birds. 10adj Forceful, very heavy (lit. very big), as rain Wà dò malugoy, nigdagsang ka ma-agbot no kilat woy lugung woy daddakol no uran. Not long later, a loud crack of lightning and thunder struck along with very heavy (lit. very big) rain. 11adj Very big; biggest Ka takubung, ngaran to ambow no daddakol no lukosan. Takubung is the name of the biggest of the male rodents. 12adj Bigger Dakoldakol ka lumansad no kalusisi to boian. The male love bird is bigger than the female. 13v Increase see: timul. 14Bigger, biggest, larger, largest. 15n Size, measurement Nigsokoran ku ka hawak to batò oyow ogkatagaan ku ka karakoli to hawak din. I measured the child's waist so that I would know the measurement of her waist. 16v To exalt, oneself or someone else. Maro-ot sikandin no ogpakabulig no igparakol ka batasan din. Maroyow poron ko duma no mgo otow ka ogparakol to ngaran din. That person is bad who has helped and then uses it to exalt his own conduct. It would be good if someone else was the one to exalt his name. 17To exalt oneself Ko ogparakoldakol ki to duma ta, sikan dod, songo og-ampow-ampow ki to duma ta. Ogdo-isokon ta ka duma ta. If we exalt ourselves over our companions, that is also, the same as making ourselves higher than our companions.

mata phr.: mata to ubud; phr.: mata to aldow (poet.). 1n Eye. Ko warò ka mata to lawa ta, konò ki ogkita to ka-awangan to kalibutan woy to kausiloman. If our bodies didn't have eyes, we could not see the light of the earth or night. 2v To wake. Ogpakoro-korò ki to kiloy ta ko sikan ki pad nighimata. We wrinkle our eyebrows when we first awaken. Ka otow no warò nakagimata no nig-onow, nigtalam sikandin. A person who gets up without awaking, he is sleep-walking. [To awaken someone else is pukow.] 3State a baby finds itself in immediately after birth. Ka iam no in-anak ka batò, ian din nagimata-an ka ka-awangan to kalibutan. As for the child who is newly birthed, what awakened him is the light of the world. 4To be awakened by something. Ka amoy, ian din nagimata-an ka anak din no ungod ogsinogow. As for the father, that which awakened him was the child who was always crying. Dic Nt 24/Aug/2006 5To see but not take notice; or to watch without lifting a finger to help. Ka du-on nalonod diò to pool, moon-ing kandan ka namataan no warò nakapangabang. Natonongan no warò nokowo-il. When there was someone who drowned at the pool, there were many people who saw but didn't go to therescue. They ignored it and didn't move. Ka an-anayan no nigkita nu ka batò diò to woig, namataan ka pad. Hongkai no nabalikid ka batò, warò ka namatoi su naragap nud on. [The reasons for the above could be that one is lazy or doesn't care, but in the case of a small child that entered the water, the person was initially unaware of an emergency.] ant: sagman 1; see: tonongan.
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