Search results for "iling"

panag-iling see fr.: naan 4.

daldal v 1To lean, as a tree that isn\\\'t straight. Ka baloy to otow no nigdaldal on to maagbut no kalamag, nigtukog to tagtu-on oyow kono ogkapolod ka baloy rin. As for the house of a person which was leaning [due to] a strong wind, it was braced by it's owner so that his house would not fall over. [A tree that isn't straight, ogdaldal “leans”, but if it leans against something, like a house or another tree, nakasandig “lean against”.] see: sandig 2; see fr.: kiling. 1.1To be at an angle past the zenith as the moon. Ogdaldal ka buan. The moon has passed the zenith (lit. the moon is leaning). 2To lean something against something else. ??

abalang 1v Seek out. Ko oglapas ki, og-aliguan ta ka maralom no og-abalang ki to mababow oyow konò ki ogka-alus diò to linow. When we cross [a river], we detour around the deep [part] and seek out the shallow [area] so that we won't be swept away by the current into the deep pool. [In the following example, a person is looking for a shallow place to cross a river in order not to be swept away by the current.] 2v To relentlessly pursue; to be after something, as a purpose. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will keep on discussing it with the father until he says yes. Kagi to balu, “Og-abalangon ku ka baloy no nighimu ni Jeremy di warò pad igkabayad ku.” The widow said, “I’m after the house that Jeremy made but I don't yet have anything to use for payment.” Ko ogkalituk on ka og-abalangon din, ogbuyu-on din on. When it is clear what she is after, [then] she will ask for it. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. Og-iling ka otow, “Nokoy ka og-abalangon to asu?” The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. Someone says, “What is that dog after? [If a person requests something which isn't given the first time he will keep coming back until the person finally gives what is requested. This can apply to a young man who keeps returning to talk to the father of a girl he wants to marry or can apply to a dog who keeps digging because he smells a rat and is determined to get it.] 3v That which someone is relentlessly pursuing. Og-atangan ku ka ig-abalangi din. I am blocking that which he is relentlessly pursuing. [The following example concerned an effort to dissuade a patient from returning home before he was well enough to do so.] see: buyù 1; see fr.: tu-ud 1. 4deriv n A person who is very persistent. Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. Ogko-iling to ogkapogos ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. It's as though the person from whom he is making a request is forced [to give it]. [If one day he asks for something and you don't give it, he will keep coming back in following days to request until you give it to him.]

abu-on n A greyish white bird, yellow bellied sapsucker ?? Ka abu-on, ko-iling to batok no alibu. Konò amana no mapotì; ogsolug. The abu-on bird, it's like the color (lit. design) of ashes. It's not so white; it's [color] is mixed. [ DB said there are not many left in the Maambago area. He said they do have a yellowish breast. The beak is not so curved; more like a chicken's bill. It eats fruits such as the balitì fruit. It's feet are similar to a chicken's except that they are smooth.] gen: manukmanuk.

alimotow 1v To miss someone, especially after a person has died. 2v To be homesick. Ko mananoy ogpakakita to duma ta, ogka-alimotow ki to ugpa-an ta. If we are unable to see our companions for a long time, we become homesick for our home place. 3vs To have had loneliness triggered. Du-on kai no ogko-ilingan to hari ni Elena no nigkita ku ka nigbayò diò to kalasara. Na-alimotow a su ogko-iling to hari ni Elena ka hinipanawan din woy ka langlanguan din. There was someone here who resembled the younger sister of Elena and I saw her pass by the road. It triggered loneliness in me because her walk and her face resembled Elena's younger sister. [If one sees someone who greatly resembles someone one knows, he is caused to think about that person. This can cause a mistake in identity and then surprise. If a song or an item of clothing causes us to think of a friend or relative who is deceased, the association can trigger the strong emotional pain of loss.] 4v To trigger grief. Tongod ko du-on amigu ta no maroyow to pogdumaruma ta di ko du-on kanta rin to Magbobo-ot di warad sikandin kai to tanò, ogka-alimotow ka ko ogpakarinog ka to sikan no kanta ko manokal pad kandin. Regarding if we have a friend with whom we had a good relationship (lit. our accompanying was good) but then if someone sings his song about God but he is no longer here on the earth, loneliness/grief will be triggered in you when you hear that song [which he sang] when he was still alive. Ogka-alimotow ki no lagboy no ogmasakit so goinawa ta. Memories of someone will be brought back and we will feel very sad (lit. our breath will hurt very much). [If one sees someone who greatly resembles someone one knows, he is caused to think about that person. This can cause a mistake in identity and then surprise. If a song or an item of clothing causes us to think of a friend or relative who is deceased, the association can trigger the strong emotional pain of loss.] 5v That which triggers grief. Ian ingkalimotow to inoy to batò no namatoy ko nigkita rin ka “ID” to anak din. That which triggered grief in the mother of the child who had died was when she saw the ID of her child.

allow 1n sun Ogsilò ka allow to masolom. The sun rises in the morning. 2n day Du-on papitu no allow to songo simana. There are seven day(s) in a week. 3n Time or season for some activity, or for something to happen. Di mangkuan, ko allow on to pogsanggì, warò nakasanggì ka nig-orok. But later on, when it was time to harvest [the corn], the people who had planted didn't get to harvest. 4adj Daytime. Ko ma-allow, ogmatikang on ka allow. If it is daytime, the sun is high. 4.1n Bright daylight. Og-iling ka inoy to, “Onow kow on su ma-allow on.” Ogmalayag on ka allow. The mother says something like, “You-pl. get up because it is bright daylight already.” The sun is shining brightly already. 5deriv n A sunny period of time or season. guabung Ko tig-allow on, ogtokoron ta no du-on gulabung su ogko-otian ka mgo bo-ugan woy ogpanlanos ka mgo apusow, payow woy mgo pangamuton. When it is already summer (lit. a sunny period of time), we recognize that is dry season because the streams dry up and the apusow, payow and [other] plants wither. [A sunny period of time is also understood to be dry as rain is limited or absent.] see: gulabung 1. 6v The sun comes out as after a rain. Ko ogpanomsolom no og-uran di mangkuan ogtilotò dò, og-aldow. When it is very early and it is raining but later [after] the rain quits, the sun comes out. 7deriv n A day of the week, when asked as a question. Ko du-on og-insò, “Nokoy aldowa asolom?” Ian ig-insò su warò mataga ko nokoy ka asolom ko Lunis woy ko Mierkulis bua. If someone asks, “What day is tomorrow?” The reason he is asking is because he does not know whether the next day (lit. tomorrow) might be Monday or Wednesday. 8deriv v To do anything in the sun, esp. to walk or travel in the sun. Sagpit kow pad woy inum kow no amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init. Stop by for a while and drink something -- for pity sakes that you were walking in the sun when it is too hot.