Search results for "inat"

agap 1v To race, involving just two people. Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Two people will race [each other] to return home. Nig-a-agap ka darua. The two people were racing [each other]. 2v To race one another, esp. of three or more people. Ka sikan no ogpa-ag-agapoy, li-agan. Ogtagù to saku no ogpallaguy. Ka ogpakaponga, ian ogpakaro-og. That [word] race each other is a game. They get in sacks and run. The one who is able to finish [first] is the one who wins. Ogpa-ag-agapoy ka mgo kuddò. The horses are racing each other. [such as in a game with multiple participants or when racing horses.] 3v To chase and catch up with someone or something. Ko du-on darua no ogpalawod no ka sagboka oghun-a, og-agapan ka oghun-a. If two [people] are going downriver [by raft/canoe] and one gets ahead, the other will chase and catch up with the one which got ahead. [The term agapan “catch up” includes the components of the words gapun “chase” and ogko-umaan “overtake”.] osyn: liu 1. 4vs To be overtaken and passed so that the other person will reach a destination ahead of him/her; beaten to a destination. Ko du-on taga Maguimon no ogligkat to Patil di nig-ulì on sikandan, no du-on nasinundul no og-ulì diò to Maambago, kagi sikandin to, “Ogka-agapan ka Usì.” Ogtabak ka taga Maguimon to, “Balagad. Hun-a ka rò du-on.” If there is someone from Maguimon who is leaving from Patil but he has left to return home, and there are others who have followed later who are returning to Maambago, they will say, “Usì, you will be inadvertently passed up.” The person from Maguimon will answer, “Nevermind. You just go on ahead.” Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Kagi to sagboka, “Ko ogka-agapan ka, koykow ka ogsakaru. Two were racing to return to the house. One said, “If you happen to be beaten [to the destination], you will be the one to fetch water.”

balò 1n A prediction based on some procedure or ceremony. Ka poghusud to natampod no songo banoy no bulu ko naponù to tanò, maroyow ka balò din su ogtuga ka homoy. When the single length of bamboo is pulled up, if it is full of earth, its sign is good because the rice will be plentiful. [Some predictions as from a test of the soil are not considered to be associated with sympathetic magic. However, predictions made in conjunction with ceremonies or sacrifices or the call of the omen bird are associated with traditional beliefs and involvement with the spirit world.] 2n With negative: Bad sign, as of bad luck Ogkagi to buyag, “Purut ka to manuk no igkuyab nu ig-awò to maro-ot no balò nu.” The older person will say, “Get a chicken to waver to remove your bad luck.” [especially that based on sympathetic magic] see: pamalii. 3v To use divination to determine the outcome or value of something. Ka mgo buyag, ogpanlo-uy to matosan no latì, no ogbabalo-an pad ko maroyow ka tanò no ogkamotan. The older people go out to a field of matured secondary growth and have a ceremony to determine whether it would be good to cut the growth on that piece of ground [for a field]. [It is based on sympathetic magic which may take various forms which are used by the Ata Manobo people to determine whether or not to cut a certain field. One method is to cut a piece of rattan the length of their cutting knife and then cut it again into lengths of the width of that same knife. From the pieces, they make a diagram on the ground of a rice house. If the pieces build a complete diagram with a ladder and an extra piece to fit in one of the rooms, the sign is good and they will cut that plot. However, if it comes out short, tor they have a tiny piece left over, they will not cut that field because they determine that the land will not produce a good crop. If there is a futhur extra long piece, it is put on the opposite end of the diagram which resembles a casket. Then they will not cut the field because they believe someone will die.] 4v To use something as a means to predict an outcome (??) 5v To have a resemblance to something Nabala-an to pogul su pogulon. He has a resemblance pogul wood because he’s lazy. [The following statement also seems to imply that that the lazy person was “destined” to be lazy. It is an insult by a parent who is angry because of the conduct.] 6v To treat by using sympathetic magic to bring about a desired result such as to rub bodies of an agressive wasp on a horse’s lips to make the horse agressive for a horse fight. Ka kuddò no nabalangitan, ogkabala-an to mgo ulod-ulod no songo ogmabulut. The horse which is being treated, [with something to make him fierce], he becomes like the creatures which are likewise fierce. 7deriv n Kind of bushy weed with long leaves which are tipped with red which could be used as a decorative plant.

dalangin 1vt To run an errand find out something, such as whether one can buy newly butchered meat. Ko du-on og-iow to babuy, kalabow, kuddò ogsugù koy to, "Dalangin kow su du-on nangiow to babuy. Purut kow to agad songo kilo." If someone is butchering a pig, water buffalo, [or] horse, we will command someone, “Go check it out because someone has butchered a pig. Get even one kilo.” see: lo-uy 2; see: ma-an 2. 2vi To be en route to go to a destination as an evil spirit which is en route to check out a dead person. Konò kow amana ogli-ag diò to tanò su ogkabaya-an kow to busow no ogdalangin to namatoy. Don't play so much outside (lit. on the ground) because you will happen to be in the path of evil spirit(s) which are en route to check out a dead person. 3v [For many people] to check something out Ko du-on og-iow, moon-ing ka oghondu-on ka ogdalanginan. If there is [an animal] being butchered, many go to check it out. 4v To delegate someone to do something. Kunto-on, to warò liwak nu to oghondiò to Malaybalay, nigdalanginan ta si Jaimi su du-on tu-ud din diò to Malaybalay no ian ta pinaboli to mgo gulayon. Today, since you didn’t have time to go to Malaybalay, we delegated Jaimi to do it [for us] because he had a purpose in Malaybalay and so we had him buy the food items. see: pagindalan; see: saligan. 5v To be pursued, as by evil spirits who want the game that a person is carrying. Ogdanginan ka otow to busow no ogbababa to babuy su ogngarog to langosa. A person who is carrying a pig on his back will be pursued by an evil spirit because it smells the blood. [Said to happen if one is carrying a pig after dark or when the light outside is dim because the spirit(s) are after the blood of the animal because it wants to take the animal away from the person. It is believed that the enounter may result in that person becoming ill.]

alap v 1To bring something to a destination. Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut. Just bring the fragrant soap. see fr.: ganuy 1; see fr.: baniwal 4. 1.1To take something somewhere. Ko du-on "jeep" no nasirà no awos no og-alapon diò to "shop" oyow ogdoyroyawon, songo igpaganuy rod to dangob no jeep. If there is a jeep which is broken down which need sto be taken to the shop to be repaired, it is also pulled by another jeep. spec: sakopu, utuk 1, baba, pangkul, ti-ang 1, bitbit 1, soy-ung, layap; see: hatod 2. 2To move or propel as fins move a fish through water. Ka alongaping, ian ka ogbo-ot to og-alap to lawa to sikan no ngalap. The fin by the fish's ear, that is what determines the movement (lit. carrying) of the body of that fish. 3To be carried away, as by water. Ko ogsamba, du-on baloy no ogka-alap. When [the river] floods, there are house(s) which are carried away. spec: alus 1; see fr.: anlas 3. 4To have someone to take something somewhere; send. 5(Fig) To be under someone's authority. Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 5.1(Fig) To carry a responsibility or hold authority. Si Joaquin pad ka naka-alap to katondanan to kapitanto Baranggay Gupitan. Joaquin is still the one who has held the position (lit. authority) of captain of Baranggay Gupitan. 5.1.1To be under someone's authority Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 6For something to be brought to someone. 6.1To be transmitted to, as an illness. Ko og-uma ka dalu no tiklas diò to songo ugpa-an, ko du-on ogpanumbaloy no ogligkat to sikan no ugpa-an, ogka-alapan ki to dalu. If an illness comes to some place, [and] if someone visits from that place, the illness will be transmitted (lit. inadvertantly carried) to us. see: halin 2.1. 6.2To be used in a certain way, as a word. Ian dò ogka-alapan no kinagian ko du-on duma ta no oghinggat to ogparigus no ogkagian ku to, “Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut.” The only way the word is used (lit. the only [meaning] carried by the word) is if we have a companion whom [we] invite to go bathing with us and I say, "Just bring the fragrant soap".

bongkag 1v To break up, turn over, as the soil in a field. Ka otow no an-anayan din pad nigbongkag to tanò din ka nigdaru, noirapan pad lagboy sikandin ka nigtalabau. The first time that a person broke up the soil as he plowed his land, he had great difficulty [doing] the work. cf: gulak 1. 2vs For something to be broken loose from something else such as blood clots that break loose and are discharged from the womb of a mother who has just given birth. Ka goti-an no agoloy, igpako-on to iam no nig-anak oyow ogkabongkag ka langosa no nigmalibuson to diralom. The roasted corn is fed to the [mother] who has newly given birth so that the blood clots will be broken loose [and be discharged] which were inside [her body]. see: pitas 1. 3v (Fig.) To be broken loose from a marriage relationship. Nabongkag on to inayon ka anakon din no iam pad na-asawa su nigtambag dò to ogpo-ongkoran din on ka asawa rin. The neice who had been recently married was broken loose [from her marriage relationship] by her aunt because she had simply advised her to desert her husband. 4v For something to inadvertently cause termination, as a pregnancy. 4.1v To be terminated, as a pregnancy resulting in a miscarriage. s Ka boi no ogpangiram, ko warò ogkako-on din no ogko-ibogan din, ogkabongkag ka batò su ogka-awa-an on. As for a woman who is newly pregnant, if she cannot eat what she is craving for, the [pregnancy] will be terminated because [the baby] will come out (lit. be removed). see: landan; see: tampod 2.