Search results for "kabal"

andal v 1To start as a machine or motor. 1.1To operate something such as to turn on, or play, a radio. Agboti nu to og-andal ka harayu. Turn up the volume (lit. operation of) the radio. 2To trigger, as a reaction or a memory. Inat to ogka-andalan ka doromdom ta. It is as though [something] triggers our thinking. see: ogka-alimotow. 3To get something started, such as to get a friend to come and eat Ko du-on magaliug noy, ko oghonatan to ko-onon, og-andalan ta to, “Usì, ogko-on kid on.” Oghinggaton tad to ogko-on kid. When we have guests, when the food is served, we get it started [by saying], “Friend, let’s eat now.” We are inviting [him] to come and eat (lit. that we-dual will eat). 4To release from mourning as to permit a widow to resume normal activities. Ko du-on ogkabalu, no tatolu on no allow no warò mokoipanow, ogkuò ki to manggad no igmaganangon ta to litos to oglo-ug kad on to so-in no manggad no ig-andal ku koykow to warò og-ogot koykow su nigbo-otan ku to nig-andal. If someone has become widowed and for three days has not been able to go out [of the house] (lit. walk), we get a piece of cloth/clothing by which we signify that it is OK now for you to run errands as this clothing is what I use to release you because I have decided to release [you]. [Typically, a widow is given something, such as an item of clothing to indicate that she is released from mourning and may resume her normal activities. Similar restrictions apply to widowers but are often less severe than those applied to widows.] 4.1To cause someone to be released from mourning. Og-andalan ta to manggad. We release [her] with [an item of] clothing to resume normal activity.

balagoy n To be busy. Ka anggam ku, ogkabalagoy pad to oghimu to baloy rin. Ian oghuno-on to ogsagman. My uncle is occupied by the building of his house. That is what he pays attention to first. Kabalagoy ki. We’re busy. [This implies the person is busy working at something profitable whereas if a person is ogkatalantan he may be occupied with something important or trivial so that he is distracted from what is priority.] cf: talantan 1; see: umalagon.

balò 1n A prediction based on some procedure or ceremony. Ka poghusud to natampod no songo banoy no bulu ko naponù to tanò, maroyow ka balò din su ogtuga ka homoy. When the single length of bamboo is pulled up, if it is full of earth, its sign is good because the rice will be plentiful. [Some predictions as from a test of the soil are not considered to be associated with sympathetic magic. However, predictions made in conjunction with ceremonies or sacrifices or the call of the omen bird are associated with traditional beliefs and involvement with the spirit world.] 2n With negative: Bad sign, as of bad luck Ogkagi to buyag, “Purut ka to manuk no igkuyab nu ig-awò to maro-ot no balò nu.” The older person will say, “Get a chicken to waver to remove your bad luck.” [especially that based on sympathetic magic] see: pamalii. 3v To use divination to determine the outcome or value of something. Ka mgo buyag, ogpanlo-uy to matosan no latì, no ogbabalo-an pad ko maroyow ka tanò no ogkamotan. The older people go out to a field of matured secondary growth and have a ceremony to determine whether it would be good to cut the growth on that piece of ground [for a field]. [It is based on sympathetic magic which may take various forms which are used by the Ata Manobo people to determine whether or not to cut a certain field. One method is to cut a piece of rattan the length of their cutting knife and then cut it again into lengths of the width of that same knife. From the pieces, they make a diagram on the ground of a rice house. If the pieces build a complete diagram with a ladder and an extra piece to fit in one of the rooms, the sign is good and they will cut that plot. However, if it comes out short, tor they have a tiny piece left over, they will not cut that field because they determine that the land will not produce a good crop. If there is a futhur extra long piece, it is put on the opposite end of the diagram which resembles a casket. Then they will not cut the field because they believe someone will die.] 4v To use something as a means to predict an outcome (??) 5v To have a resemblance to something Nabala-an to pogul su pogulon. He has a resemblance pogul wood because he’s lazy. [The following statement also seems to imply that that the lazy person was “destined” to be lazy. It is an insult by a parent who is angry because of the conduct.] 6v To treat by using sympathetic magic to bring about a desired result such as to rub bodies of an agressive wasp on a horse’s lips to make the horse agressive for a horse fight. Ka kuddò no nabalangitan, ogkabala-an to mgo ulod-ulod no songo ogmabulut. The horse which is being treated, [with something to make him fierce], he becomes like the creatures which are likewise fierce. 7deriv n Kind of bushy weed with long leaves which are tipped with red which could be used as a decorative plant.

bundal v 1To deliberately ram into something such as another vehicle. 2To ram into something whether moving frontwards or backwards, such as another vehicle or into a cliff with a raft. Ka otow no ogpalawod to gakit din ka ogtuwal, ogbantayan din oyow konò ogpakabundal ka lobut to gakit to dalama, oyow konò ogkabalikid. A person who travels with the current as he goes downriver by raft, he will be watching out so that the front part (lit. base) will not get rammed into a cliff so that it won't be capsized. [It is the lobut “base” of the raft which heads the raft as it goes downriver, not the u-ud “tip” because it is the base of the bamboo that is strongest and is heeaded downstream..]]

bungkù v 1To come to an end, limit; boundary. Ko hondo-i ogkataman ka hikot to asu, du-on dò ogbungkù. Wherever the tether of the dog ends, that is where he will be limited. Du-on otow no nalagak ka salapi din no darua no gatus. Nigbungkù dò du-on to namanghò di warò din on kita-a. There was a person ho lost two hundred [pesos] of his money. He came to an end of looking for it but didn't find it. 2Give up on someone or something, as when an action proves futile Ko du-on duma ta no du-on batasan no konò ogkabalowbalow, ogbungku-an tad ka og-anad kandin to maroyow. If we have a companion who has conduct which cannot be changed, we sgive up on teaching him [to do] good. 3To run out of options, as a doctor who cannot treat an illness. Nigbungku-an on to doctor si Ann Joy. Agad ko du-on ogkoimu on dan to ogpangabang, ogkamatoy rò sikandin. The doctor gran out of options for Ann Joy. Even if there was something they could do to save her, she would still die. see: tawad 1; see: taman 1. 4To allow to go so far and no farther such as when cutting a field. Ka otow no ogkakamot, du-on patamanan din ka ogpo-ilisan ka kamot din no ian ka pabungku-an to kamot din. A person who is making a field, has an ending of the edge of his field and that is how far he will ballow his field to extend. [It may not be the boundry of his property but it is the farthest extent to which he will have his field cut.] 4.1To set a limit. Ka lubid to asu ka ogpakabungkù oyow du-on dò ogkataman. The rope is that which is setting a limit it so that it will not go any farther.

nanoy 1adj Slow. Di mananoy ka nig-alap ku no makina su lalimma rò ka sikan no kabalyus din. But the [motorboat] motor which I had brought was slow because it only had five horsepower. 2adv take a long time. Mananoy ki ogpoko-uma su og-aligu kid on ogbayò. It takes us a long time to arrive because we have to detour (lit. go around as we pass by]. 3v To be slow to do something. Ka nanhondiò no mgo Monobo to Manilà, ogmananoy ogman-ulì dini to Davao. The Manobos who went to Manila were slow to return to Davao. 4v Be slow to carry out an activity or fulfill a request. Ka inoy no ogsugù to anak to ogpa-angoy to hapuy no malugoy ogsasindog ka batò, ogkagi ka inoy to, “Amana so-i batò no ognanoynanoy to ogkaragusu kid on to ogsugba no warò hapuy! As for the mother who orders her child to fetch fire and then the child just stands there for a long time, the mother will say, “For goodness sake this child is being slow when we are in a hurry to cook and there is no fire! Ka otow no ogboli to wasoy, ognanoynanoy ka ogpitow su ka maroyow, ogku-on din. The person who is purchasing an axe, he will be slow in looking because the one that is best (lit. good), [that is the one] he will buy. 5v Something taking a long time, or the reason for being a long time. Ian igmananoy to pog-ulì su warad igkapiliti to poglibong to pog-ulì. That which took them so long to return was because they did not have any fare with which to return home. 6Slowness. Ian igmananoy ta to ogboli to wasoy su og-iling-ilingon ta ko du-on go-at. The reason for our slowness to purchase the axe is because we will examine it like to see if it has a crack. 7v Be slow to carry out an activity or fulfill a request. Ka inoy no ogsugù to anak to ogpa-angoy to hapuy no malugoy ogsasindog ka batò, ogkagi ka inoy to, “Amana so-i batò no ognanoynanoy to ogkaragusu kid on to ogsugba no warò hapuy! As for the mother who orders her child to fetch fire and then the child just stands there for a long time, the mother will say, “For goodness sake this child is being slow when we are in a hurry to cook and there is no fire! Ka otow no ogboli to wasoy, ognanoynanoy ka ogpitow su ka maroyow, ogku-on din. The person who is purchasing an axe, he will be slow in looking because the one that is best (lit. good), [that is the one] he will buy. 8adv Wait a minute. Nanoy ka pà su ogpanapatus a pad. Wait a minute because I will put my shoes on next. see: tagad 1. 9v Dilidaly ?? 10adv To do something slowly Ko tongod to baloy no og-awos to ogmatikangon, og-alikan to nanoynanoy su awos to ogsongolan. Regarding a house which needs to be raised, it is jacked up slowly because it is necessary to block the space [made from the lift]. 11adv Very slowly. 12adv Slower.

pasaylu 1v forgive Di ko du-on ogpakasalò, ko du-on ogbuyù to ogkooy-u ko ogpasaylu, konon litos ko ogkabalagad ka salò din. Ko ogpasayluan nu, konò ogkabalagad. If there is someone who has done wrong, if there is someone who requests mercy or forgiveness, it's not appropriate if his wrong-doing is ignored. If you forgive him, [the fault] isn't being ignored. [This Cebuano borrowing for “forgive” is widely used among the Ata Manobo people. The verbal expression, Ogma-awanga nu rò bag ka goinawa nu, “Make your breath clear [towards someone]...” at least implies forgiveness because that cannot happen while one is harboring any ill feeling toward his/her companions.] 2 3 4 5 6

salò 1n offense [or wrong doing] Nokoy ka salò ku? What is my offense? 2v to offend Ogsalò ki to otow. We offend people. 3v to do something wrong Di ko du-on ogpakasalò, ko du-on ogbuyù to ogkooy-u ko ogpasaylu, konon litos ko ogkabalagad ka salò din. Ko ogpasayluan nu, konò ogkabalagad. If there is someone who has done wrong, if there is someone who requests mercy or forgiveness, it's not appropriate if his wrong doing is ignored. If you forgive him, [the fault] isn't being ignored. [Apparently, this term carries the sense of someone having done something wrong toward someone else. However, there are occasions when this expression is used of a situation where a person has done the right thing but a person actually in the wrong is offended as when someone goes to the police to report a theft. (Ck with TA for other senses.)] 4v To be wronged by someone
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