Search results for "kagi"

kagis v Scrape. see fr.: kulkul; see fr.: kuit 6.

kuit v 1pick out, as an ant from food. Ko du-on alisalung to sinugba, ogkuiton ta to kutsara. If there is a black ant in the food being cooked, we will pick it out with a spoon. [The amount of force exerted depends on the context. In the case of an eye, the kuit is very gentle, but if someone cannot hear, it becomes a forceful poke.] see fr.: kois 4. 2To have someone pick something out, as from one's eye Ko nabulog ki to lagut, ogpakuit ta If something has gotten into our eye, we have someone pick it out. Ko ogkadugi ka pa-a ta, ogkuiton ta to dagum oyow ogka-awò ka dugi. If we get a thorn in our foot, we will pick it out with a needle so that the thorn will be removed. 3Shove something out of the way Ko du-on ulod no namatoy no imbalabag diò to dalan ko du-on ogpakabayò, ogkuiton su ogkalimorang. If there is a dead snake which is laying across the trail if someone is passing by, [he] will shove [it] out of the way because it gives him the willies. 4To poke, as a person who doesn't hear one calling Ko diò ki to koon-ingan no mgo otow woy du-on duma ta no konò ogdinog ko og-umawan ta, oghondia-an ta no ogkuiton ta kai to hawak. If we are with a crowd of people and we have a companion who doesn't hear [us] when we call [him], we will go to [him] and poke him in the side. [Comparing kuit to koblit, DB says koblit is much more gentle. The person trying to get one's attention will give him a fairly strong “poke”.] 5Brush off Ko moon-ing ka lawo-lawò to talubagì, ogpanguiton ta to walis ka baloy to talubagì oyow ogka-awò. Ko ogkuiton nu ogkaragdag ka mgo lagut. If there are a lot of dirty spider webs, we brush off the webs (lit. houses) of the spiders so that they will be removed. When we brush them off, the debris drops to the floor. 6Scrape out. Ogkuiton ta ka bogas to kapayas no noinug. Ka kutsara ka ogka-ayun no igkuit. We scrape out the seeds of the ripe papaya. A spoon is what works to scrape. see: kagis.

abalang 1v Seek out. Ko oglapas ki, og-aliguan ta ka maralom no og-abalang ki to mababow oyow konò ki ogka-alus diò to linow. When we cross [a river], we detour around the deep [part] and seek out the shallow [area] so that we won't be swept away by the current into the deep pool. [In the following example, a person is looking for a shallow place to cross a river in order not to be swept away by the current.] 2v To relentlessly pursue; to be after something, as a purpose. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will keep on discussing it with the father until he says yes. Kagi to balu, “Og-abalangon ku ka baloy no nighimu ni Jeremy di warò pad igkabayad ku.” The widow said, “I’m after the house that Jeremy made but I don't yet have anything to use for payment.” Ko ogkalituk on ka og-abalangon din, ogbuyu-on din on. When it is clear what she is after, [then] she will ask for it. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. Og-iling ka otow, “Nokoy ka og-abalangon to asu?” The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. Someone says, “What is that dog after? [If a person requests something which isn't given the first time he will keep coming back until the person finally gives what is requested. This can apply to a young man who keeps returning to talk to the father of a girl he wants to marry or can apply to a dog who keeps digging because he smells a rat and is determined to get it.] 3v That which someone is relentlessly pursuing. Og-atangan ku ka ig-abalangi din. I am blocking that which he is relentlessly pursuing. [The following example concerned an effort to dissuade a patient from returning home before he was well enough to do so.] see: buyù 1; see fr.: tu-ud 1. 4deriv n A person who is very persistent. Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. Ogko-iling to ogkapogos ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. It's as though the person from whom he is making a request is forced [to give it]. [If one day he asks for something and you don't give it, he will keep coming back in following days to request until you give it to him.]

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

agap 1v To race, involving just two people. Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Two people will race [each other] to return home. Nig-a-agap ka darua. The two people were racing [each other]. 2v To race one another, esp. of three or more people. Ka sikan no ogpa-ag-agapoy, li-agan. Ogtagù to saku no ogpallaguy. Ka ogpakaponga, ian ogpakaro-og. That [word] race each other is a game. They get in sacks and run. The one who is able to finish [first] is the one who wins. Ogpa-ag-agapoy ka mgo kuddò. The horses are racing each other. [such as in a game with multiple participants or when racing horses.] 3v To chase and catch up with someone or something. Ko du-on darua no ogpalawod no ka sagboka oghun-a, og-agapan ka oghun-a. If two [people] are going downriver [by raft/canoe] and one gets ahead, the other will chase and catch up with the one which got ahead. [The term agapan “catch up” includes the components of the words gapun “chase” and ogko-umaan “overtake”.] osyn: liu 1. 4vs To be overtaken and passed so that the other person will reach a destination ahead of him/her; beaten to a destination. Ko du-on taga Maguimon no ogligkat to Patil di nig-ulì on sikandan, no du-on nasinundul no og-ulì diò to Maambago, kagi sikandin to, “Ogka-agapan ka Usì.” Ogtabak ka taga Maguimon to, “Balagad. Hun-a ka rò du-on.” If there is someone from Maguimon who is leaving from Patil but he has left to return home, and there are others who have followed later who are returning to Maambago, they will say, “Usì, you will be inadvertently passed up.” The person from Maguimon will answer, “Nevermind. You just go on ahead.” Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Kagi to sagboka, “Ko ogka-agapan ka, koykow ka ogsakaru. Two were racing to return to the house. One said, “If you happen to be beaten [to the destination], you will be the one to fetch water.”

agpu-unan 1n To be afflicted by an illness believed to be a result of meeting a long-haired spirit while bathing in a river or stream. Ko du-on batò no ogdaralu no ungod ogparigus, ogkagi ka mgo buyag to na-agpu-unan su nalimuan to gamowgamow. If a child gets sick who is always bathing [in the river], the older people say that he afflicted by an evil spirit because he affected by a long-haired spirit [which lives in the water]. [Wherever the swelling is on a body of the child, the people believe that is where the hair of the spirit wrapped around the child’s body.] see fr.: gamowgamow; see: limuan; see fr.: limuan; see: gamowgamow. 2v To become ill from contact with a female spirit with long hair which lives near a stream or river. Ko duon ogdaralu no mgo batò no malasi ogpamarigus diò to woig, kagi to amoy, “Pitow ka. Na-agpu-unan ka.” If there are children who become ill who are often bathing in the river (lit. water), the father says, “See. You have become ill from a spirit source.” Ko du-on batò no ogdaralu no ungod ogparigus, ogkagi ka mgo buyag to na-agpu-unan su nalimuan to gamowgamow. If a child gets sick who is always bathing [in the river], the older people say that he afflicted by an evil spirit because he was affected by a long-haired spirit [which lives in the water]. [They believe that there is a female spirit with long hair called a gamowgamow who lives in the water. They believe that if an adult or child gets tangled in her hair while bathing, it will cause them to be ill. They also believe that unless a special spirit ceremony is performed to remove this illness, the person may die. They believe a withered calf is one form of this illness but any illness following bathing is suspect.] see: limuan; see: gamowgamow.

alap v 1To bring something to a destination. Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut. Just bring the fragrant soap. see fr.: ganuy 1; see fr.: baniwal 4. 1.1To take something somewhere. Ko du-on "jeep" no nasirà no awos no og-alapon diò to "shop" oyow ogdoyroyawon, songo igpaganuy rod to dangob no jeep. If there is a jeep which is broken down which need sto be taken to the shop to be repaired, it is also pulled by another jeep. spec: sakopu, utuk 1, baba, pangkul, ti-ang 1, bitbit 1, soy-ung, layap; see: hatod 2. 2To move or propel as fins move a fish through water. Ka alongaping, ian ka ogbo-ot to og-alap to lawa to sikan no ngalap. The fin by the fish's ear, that is what determines the movement (lit. carrying) of the body of that fish. 3To be carried away, as by water. Ko ogsamba, du-on baloy no ogka-alap. When [the river] floods, there are house(s) which are carried away. spec: alus 1; see fr.: anlas 3. 4To have someone to take something somewhere; send. 5(Fig) To be under someone's authority. Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 5.1(Fig) To carry a responsibility or hold authority. Si Joaquin pad ka naka-alap to katondanan to kapitanto Baranggay Gupitan. Joaquin is still the one who has held the position (lit. authority) of captain of Baranggay Gupitan. 5.1.1To be under someone's authority Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 6For something to be brought to someone. 6.1To be transmitted to, as an illness. Ko og-uma ka dalu no tiklas diò to songo ugpa-an, ko du-on ogpanumbaloy no ogligkat to sikan no ugpa-an, ogka-alapan ki to dalu. If an illness comes to some place, [and] if someone visits from that place, the illness will be transmitted (lit. inadvertantly carried) to us. see: halin 2.1. 6.2To be used in a certain way, as a word. Ian dò ogka-alapan no kinagian ko du-on duma ta no oghinggat to ogparigus no ogkagian ku to, “Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut.” The only way the word is used (lit. the only [meaning] carried by the word) is if we have a companion whom [we] invite to go bathing with us and I say, "Just bring the fragrant soap".

alukuy 1n A friend. 2v To discuss something with someone else. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone desires to get married, he will pursue it. He will continuously discuss it with the father [of the girl] until he agrees (lit says “yes”). [This word seems to apply to discussion of specific issues and not to casual conversation. Ogpanangnangonoy seems to apply more correctly to casual conversation and exchange of general information.] 2.1v The thing which is being discussed. Ian dò ogka-alukuy ko songo monu ka igbotad no gastu to sikan no boi. The only thing they will be discussing is how much they will pay immediately upon request as a brideprice for that girl. 2.2v That which is discussed; topic of discussion. Ko du-on otow no og-utang di ogkasipod no ognangon, di songo otow on ka ognangonan din. Ogkagi to sikan no otow to, “Du-on ig-alukuy din koykow.” If there is a person who [wants to] borrow get something on credit but is ashamed to speak up, then he will tell another person. That person will say, “He has something to discuss with you.” 2.3v To have a group discussion. Ogma-al-alukuyoy ka mgo buyag tongod ko du-on mgo lupuganon. The leaders are having a group discussion about whether there will be [eventual] reciprocal exhanges for a brideprice. 3deriv n Discussion. Ian on amoy-amoy ka ogtangkò to alukuyan. The person who speaks on behalf of the man is the spokesman for the discussion (lit. one who faces the discussion). [In a wedding arrangement, the spokesman for the man is called an amoy-amoy (a term used for an adoptive or foster father).] 4deriv n A friendship gift. Pal-alukuyan dan. [It is] their friendship gift.

amboy 1n Daughter-in-law. Ko og-asawa ka anak ku no lukos, ian amboy ku ka asawa rin. If my son (lit. male offspring) marries, his wife is my daughter-in-law. (dial. var. andoy) 2deriv n A term of address to the daughter-in-law of a cousin. Ka sulod ku, ogkagian din ka amboy ku to, “Amboy-amboy ku sikoykow.” As for my cousin, he says to my daughter-in-law, “You are my daughter-in-law removed. [There is no equivalent address term in English. The closest would be to render the expression as to be thought of as a daughter-in-law, or “daughter-in-law removed”. The reduplication lets the hearer know that she is not a true daughter-in-law.]

anak phr.: anak to dalan; phr.: anak to pamubungon. 1n A male or female offspring of an animal or human; son or daughter. 2v To give birth. Ko ogkapanoy ogkatapid ka batò diò to diralom to gotok, oglomulan ka inoy ko og-anak. If the baby (lit. child) in the abdomen has been properly positioned ahead of time, the mother will have it easier when she gives birth. Gabi-i pad nig-anak on ka kuddò ku. Just yesterday my horse gave birth. cf: agud. 2.1v To give birth in some place. - Ogdurugmun ka babuy to og-anakan din. A pig makes a bed for [a place where] she will give birth. 2.2v To give birth to multiple offspring. Ka karpa no ngalap, woy ogpanganak ko ogsilò ka bulan. Carp fish don’t give birth to multiple offspring until the moon comes out. 2.2.1v To give birth multiple times; give birth frequently. Ko du-on og-anak no warò pad nigtu-ig ka anak din no ogpanganak man dò sikandin, oghingaranan no mahariharion no manggianak su malasi og-anak. If someone gives birth when her child is not yet a year old so she is giving birth again, she is called a mother who produces siblings [one after another] because she frequently gives birth. 2.2.2v To reach birthing time. Ko du-on og-insò ko kon-u nanganak ka amboy nu, kagi to songo otow, “Ka ligad dò no allow ka pogpanganak.” If someone asks when your daughter-in-law delivered [her baby], another person will answer, “The previous day was her birthing time”. 2.2.3v Those which are birthed. Ka po-it, ka alu-an, woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it, mudfish and the catfish, are birthed alive (lit. directly live, when it is the time for them to be born [lit. the ones being birthed]. 3deriv n Uterus Ka a-anakan, sikan ka ugpa-an to batò diò gotok to inoy. The uterus, that is the dwelling place of the child in the abdomen of the mother. 4deriv n An adopted child. Ogko-iling ki Ugalinga no nig-uyamu to mgo batò, ogkoimu no anak-anak ran. It’s like Ugalinga who is caring from the childen, they have become heir adopted children. see: uyamuan. 4.1deriv n A stepchild. [A stepchild, that is the child of one's spouse is an anak-anak but not considered to be an uyamuan which is used of an adopted or foster child] 5deriv n Nephew or neice, also a cousin’s child. Si Binitu, songo maka-amung ku rod su anakon ku si Angelina. As for Binitu, he has also become my son-in-law because Angelina is my neice. 6deriv n Anything that has a young offspring; a mother, but especially a nursing mother. Ka mgo ngalap to woig no poit maroyow ka sabow rin to duon iam no manggi-anak su oggatasan. As for the po-it fish [lit. creatures of the water which are po-it], its soup is good for the nursing mother because [her breasts] will produce milk . [Also applies to female animals with young.] 6.1vs To become a nursing mother. Ka ogkamanggi-anak on no boi, sikan ka iam nig-anak no du-on on ogtago-uro-on no batò. Sikan ka ungod din oggibo-on, ogpasusuon, ogsakopuon woy og-uahon. A woman who has become a nursing mother, that is the one who has has newly given birth and now has a a child to care for. [Also applies to female animals who newly give birth] 7deriv n Parent and child doing something together; from parent’s standpoint. 8deriv n A child accompanied by his/her parent or parent accompanying his/her child. Ka tag-anak, ka amoy nigduruma to anak din. A child accompanied by its father, [that is when] the father has accompanied his son/daughter (lit. offspring). Ka amoy no nighondiò to lunsud, tag-anak ka nigduruma to du-on ogbolion dan diò to lunsud. The father who went to town, they are the child with his parent who accompanied each other to buy [something] in town. 8.1n A mother and her child. 9deriv v To hunt for frogs by searching for the frog eggs. Ogpaki-anak ki. We search for the offspring [of frogs]. Ogpakianak ki, ko ogkita ki to atolug to bakbak, du-on ta rò ogpamitawon ka inoy su du-on dò ian to marani ka og-olon. When we hunt for frogs, when we see the eggs of the frog, we will just find the mother [frog] because she will be there closely watching over [her eggs]. 10n Descendent of recent past [That is, descendants who were known andcan be recounted by one’s relatives in contrast to kapunganan which would refer to decendants a long time removed.] see: kapunganan 1.

antog 1v To purposely disturb or jostle something or someone. Ogtu-uran ta to og-antog to duma ta su ogko-on kid on; ogpukawon ta. We purposely disturb our companion because we will eat now; we awaken him/her. [such as when wanting to awaken someone] see fr.: dugnal 1. 2vs To be jostled. Ko ligad ki no ogkakois ta ka lamisaan, ogka-antog su nawo-il. If we brush against the table as we pass, it is jostled because it moved. 2.1vs To be disturbed as by a touch, a noise or a movement. Ko ogkoirogò ki to mo-ugtu no du-on ogkakagi, ogka-antog ki no ogkapukawan ki. Ka doromdom ta ka na-antog. If we sleep at noon and there are those who are talking, we will be disturbed and we will be awakened. It is our thinking which was disturbed. Na-antog ka lapinid to nabus-ugan to woig no pigsogod si Elena. The wasps were disturbed by having water poured on them and then Elena was stung. 3v To jog someone's memory; remind. Ko du-on utang to duma ta no konò ogbayad, og-antogan ta to og-insò. If one of our companions has a debt which [he/she] doesn't pay, we jog his/her memory by asking. Magi-insò ka igbogoy ku no babuy kaniu, ig-antog ku to doromdom nu ko kalingawan nu ka kanak? The pig which I am giving to you is being used to open the door to inquiry to jog your memory (lit. thinking) if you have forgotten that which is mine [that is, an unpaid debt for help with a bride price]? [such as when a debt has not been paid.] 4adj To disturb someone emotionally. Na-antog ka goinawa rin to bayungbayung dò kandin. Natokow ki su warò ki no-inso-i. His emotions (lit breath) were disturbed by those were were just making [false] accusations. We were taken by surprise because we had not been asked [about it]. [that is, to have negative emotions triggered by some incident]