Search results for "kita"

bantang 1n Pronged fish spear. see fr.: salapang; see: salapang. 2v To fish with a spear, as to wait and watch for them to come so one can spear them. Ko ogpamantang, ogbabantayan nu ka sawog no diò pad to mariù. Ko ogpakalongod ka ogbayò, ogpamantangon on to ogpamilak. When you fish with a spear, you watch for the silver-colored fish when it is still far away. When it passes near, [you] spear it as you jab/thrust at it. 3v To watch in readiness to spear, as a fish Ogbabantang ka to isdà no ogligad no ko ogpakalongod on, ogbantangon on ka ogpilak. You watch in readiness to spear a fish and when one happens to get close, you spear it as you jab/thrust at it. 3.1v To lay in wait to ambush a person. see: gopas 1. 4v To be struck, as by light. Ka baloy ni Amò, ogbantangan to allow. Ko ogsilò ko masolom on, lagboy ogkabandogan to layag to allow. As for Fathers house, it is struck by [the light of] the sun. When it rises in the morning, it is very much inadvertantly struck by the rays of the sun. see: bandog; see: sugat 1. 5v To come into clear view Ko ogpakalongod on kanta ka sawog, ogkabantang ta. When the sawog fish comes next to us, it comes into our clear view.. [Also would apply to the image through binoculars which brings the image near and makes it very clear.] 5.1v To be sighted, as with a gun or binoculars Ko ogtuturan ta ka manukmanuk, no ko ogkabantang tad, ogpabotu-on ka pusil no ogkasugat on. When we |aim [a gun] at a bird, and when we have sighted it, [we] shoot the air gun (lit. cause the gun to explode) and then i[the bird] is hit. see: kita 1; see: molog 1.

batuk 1v To find, discover. Inat konò ogpakabatuk. It's as if one cannot discover [the meaning]. Warò ki pad makabatuk to maroyow no dalan. We had not yet discovered the good path. Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. [The mixture] is buried in the ground for two days [before]] finding [it to have become] the agkud delicacy. see fr.: tugul 3; see fr.: kita 2; see fr.: tolom 3. 2v To be effective. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever medicine is effective against an illness, that is strong medicine. 3v To identify, such as to narrow down to the one person whom one would marry. Ko konò ogkahalin ka goinawa nu diò to duma no boi, no ian nu ogbatukon ka sikan no boi no nasabutan nu. If your love (lit. breath) does not change to another girl, then you have identified the girl with whom you had an agreement [to be the one whom you would marry]. [The sense here seems to be that one's search is narrowed down to this one person so that one knows she is the one he is looking for.] see: tu-on 1. 4v To locate, or go to a specific place for a specific purpose. Ka kunto-on no tipouri no mgo otow, du-on batasan to du-on on indosanan no kasilyas no du-on dò ogbatuk ka og-indos. As for the present-day people who have come later (lit. last), there is a custom to have an outhouse for defecating and so that is [the only] place people will go to to defecate. [The following seems to mean that in contrast to the past when people defecated anywhere, now people go to only that specific location which has been made for that purpose.] 5v To find or locate Ko oglapas ki, ko konò ki ogpakabatuk to mababow su mabolbol ka woig, ogka-alus ki diò to maralom. If we cross [a river], if we cannot locate a shallow area because the water is swift, we will be carried away by the current to a deep area. 6v To get at, or be effective against, as an illness. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever the medicine is which gets at the illness, that is efficatious (lit. strong) medicine. see: tu-on ??. 7v To be passed down, as some characteristic or authority which is recognized in someone's descendant Sikan ka oghingaranan noy no batuk to anak. Ka katondanan ni Dabid, nigbatuk ki Husi. No ka katondanan ni Husi, nigbatuk man dò diò ki Hisus. That is [what] we call passed down to an offspring. The authority of David, it is passed down to Joseph. And the authority of Joseph, it is then passed down to/found in in Jesus. 8v to find to be [or to have become] something Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. That which found to be agkud is buried in the ground for two days. [In the following example, the it takes two days for the mixture of ingredients to change into the food item called akud.] 9Retrieve food once cached away. 10Return. 11v find out, reveal 12Kabatukon ku so-i komos. ???

kawad 1n Large fish hook used to catch carp, mudfish or large eels. [Term used upper Liboganon River; Langilan.] see: kitang 1; see fr.: kitang 1; see fr.: bunnit 1; see: bunnit 1. 2v To catch [a fish].

pammunit see fr.: kitang 2.

alig 1n Attraction, especially toward someone of the opposite sex. Ko ogko-iniat ki to boi to sikan ki pad nigkita, sikan ka alig pad to mata su ko konò tad ogkito-on ka sikan no boi, ogkalingawan ta sikandin. If we desire a girl when this is the first time we have seen her, that is the attraction of the eye(s) because if we don't see that girl [any more], we will just forget about her. Ka sikan no alig, konò no maro-ot su ko ogkita ki to boi no du-on goinawa ta kandin di mangkuan ogkasipod ki no ognangon to du-on goinawa ta kandin. Konò no ian ta ig-alig su oghimu ki to maro-ot. That [kind] of attraction isn't bad because when we see a girl and we like her (lit. have breath toward her), yet later on we will be shy to say that we like her. Our attraction isn't a means of attraction to for doing (lit.because we will do) something wrong. [The unreduplicated form of the word alig is described as not a bad emotion because a person is just interested in that person, but the initial interest may pass. That interest can grow into an appropriate relationship leading toward marriage. However, a person who is described as aligon is someone whose interest goes beyond the appropriate. Those people may desire someone who is married and may not be limited to one relationship.] 2v To be drawn to someone, as to God. Ko nig-alig ki to Magbobo-ot, indakoli ki to goinawa to Magbobo-ot. Kandin dò ka nig-alig. When we were drawn to God, our love (lit. breath) for God was increased. He alone was the one who drew us [to Himself]. 3v Affection for someone. Natapid ka pog-alig din no du-on on dakol no goinawa rin. Ka sikan no alig, sagboka rò no boi ka indakoli rin. Sikan ka ligkatan to og-asawo-on din. His affection for someone has become focused (lit. arranged). As for that affection, there is just one girl whom he loves. That is the source of his getting married [to her]. 4vs To be attracted by something such as a pretty design. Ogka-aligan ta ka maroyow no batok. We are attracted by the pretty design. 5v To make a commitment to one another as two who decide to get married. Nig-a-alig sikandan su nokog-un-unawa goinawa ran. Nokogsabut ka sikan. Nokog-iniatoy. Nokogso-ob ka alig dan no darua. They have made a commitment [to each other] because their feelings (lit. breath) werere the same. They have come to an agreement with each other. They desire each other. The attraction of the two [of them] is mutual. 6deriv n A lustful person. Ka otow no ogko-iniat to moon-ing no boi, sikan ka aligon. The person who desires many women, that is a lustful person. 7v To lust after others of opposite sex, not one's spouse. Ko du-on asawa woy ko dalaga, tibò din og-aligon. Whether it is a person who has a spouse or an unmarried lady, he lusts after all [of them].

alimotow 1v To miss someone, especially after a person has died. 2v To be homesick. Ko mananoy ogpakakita to duma ta, ogka-alimotow ki to ugpa-an ta. If we are unable to see our companions for a long time, we become homesick for our home place. 3vs To have had loneliness triggered. Du-on kai no ogko-ilingan to hari ni Elena no nigkita ku ka nigbayò diò to kalasara. Na-alimotow a su ogko-iling to hari ni Elena ka hinipanawan din woy ka langlanguan din. There was someone here who resembled the younger sister of Elena and I saw her pass by the road. It triggered loneliness in me because her walk and her face resembled Elena's younger sister. [If one sees someone who greatly resembles someone one knows, he is caused to think about that person. This can cause a mistake in identity and then surprise. If a song or an item of clothing causes us to think of a friend or relative who is deceased, the association can trigger the strong emotional pain of loss.] 4v To trigger grief. Tongod ko du-on amigu ta no maroyow to pogdumaruma ta di ko du-on kanta rin to Magbobo-ot di warad sikandin kai to tanò, ogka-alimotow ka ko ogpakarinog ka to sikan no kanta ko manokal pad kandin. Regarding if we have a friend with whom we had a good relationship (lit. our accompanying was good) but then if someone sings his song about God but he is no longer here on the earth, loneliness/grief will be triggered in you when you hear that song [which he sang] when he was still alive. Ogka-alimotow ki no lagboy no ogmasakit so goinawa ta. Memories of someone will be brought back and we will feel very sad (lit. our breath will hurt very much). [If one sees someone who greatly resembles someone one knows, he is caused to think about that person. This can cause a mistake in identity and then surprise. If a song or an item of clothing causes us to think of a friend or relative who is deceased, the association can trigger the strong emotional pain of loss.] 5v That which triggers grief. Ian ingkalimotow to inoy to batò no namatoy ko nigkita rin ka “ID” to anak din. That which triggered grief in the mother of the child who had died was when she saw the ID of her child.

anak phr.: anak to dalan; phr.: anak to pamubungon. 1n A male or female offspring of an animal or human; son or daughter. 2v To give birth. Ko ogkapanoy ogkatapid ka batò diò to diralom to gotok, oglomulan ka inoy ko og-anak. If the baby (lit. child) in the abdomen has been properly positioned ahead of time, the mother will have it easier when she gives birth. Gabi-i pad nig-anak on ka kuddò ku. Just yesterday my horse gave birth. cf: agud. 2.1v To give birth in some place. - Ogdurugmun ka babuy to og-anakan din. A pig makes a bed for [a place where] she will give birth. 2.2v To give birth to multiple offspring. Ka karpa no ngalap, woy ogpanganak ko ogsilò ka bulan. Carp fish don’t give birth to multiple offspring until the moon comes out. 2.2.1v To give birth multiple times; give birth frequently. Ko du-on og-anak no warò pad nigtu-ig ka anak din no ogpanganak man dò sikandin, oghingaranan no mahariharion no manggianak su malasi og-anak. If someone gives birth when her child is not yet a year old so she is giving birth again, she is called a mother who produces siblings [one after another] because she frequently gives birth. 2.2.2v To reach birthing time. Ko du-on og-insò ko kon-u nanganak ka amboy nu, kagi to songo otow, “Ka ligad dò no allow ka pogpanganak.” If someone asks when your daughter-in-law delivered [her baby], another person will answer, “The previous day was her birthing time”. 2.2.3v Those which are birthed. Ka po-it, ka alu-an, woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it, mudfish and the catfish, are birthed alive (lit. directly live, when it is the time for them to be born [lit. the ones being birthed]. 3deriv n Uterus Ka a-anakan, sikan ka ugpa-an to batò diò gotok to inoy. The uterus, that is the dwelling place of the child in the abdomen of the mother. 4deriv n An adopted child. Ogko-iling ki Ugalinga no nig-uyamu to mgo batò, ogkoimu no anak-anak ran. It’s like Ugalinga who is caring from the childen, they have become heir adopted children. see: uyamuan. 4.1deriv n A stepchild. [A stepchild, that is the child of one's spouse is an anak-anak but not considered to be an uyamuan which is used of an adopted or foster child] 5deriv n Nephew or neice, also a cousin’s child. Si Binitu, songo maka-amung ku rod su anakon ku si Angelina. As for Binitu, he has also become my son-in-law because Angelina is my neice. 6deriv n Anything that has a young offspring; a mother, but especially a nursing mother. Ka mgo ngalap to woig no poit maroyow ka sabow rin to duon iam no manggi-anak su oggatasan. As for the po-it fish [lit. creatures of the water which are po-it], its soup is good for the nursing mother because [her breasts] will produce milk . [Also applies to female animals with young.] 6.1vs To become a nursing mother. Ka ogkamanggi-anak on no boi, sikan ka iam nig-anak no du-on on ogtago-uro-on no batò. Sikan ka ungod din oggibo-on, ogpasusuon, ogsakopuon woy og-uahon. A woman who has become a nursing mother, that is the one who has has newly given birth and now has a a child to care for. [Also applies to female animals who newly give birth] 7deriv n Parent and child doing something together; from parent’s standpoint. 8deriv n A child accompanied by his/her parent or parent accompanying his/her child. Ka tag-anak, ka amoy nigduruma to anak din. A child accompanied by its father, [that is when] the father has accompanied his son/daughter (lit. offspring). Ka amoy no nighondiò to lunsud, tag-anak ka nigduruma to du-on ogbolion dan diò to lunsud. The father who went to town, they are the child with his parent who accompanied each other to buy [something] in town. 8.1n A mother and her child. 9deriv v To hunt for frogs by searching for the frog eggs. Ogpaki-anak ki. We search for the offspring [of frogs]. Ogpakianak ki, ko ogkita ki to atolug to bakbak, du-on ta rò ogpamitawon ka inoy su du-on dò ian to marani ka og-olon. When we hunt for frogs, when we see the eggs of the frog, we will just find the mother [frog] because she will be there closely watching over [her eggs]. 10n Descendent of recent past [That is, descendants who were known andcan be recounted by one’s relatives in contrast to kapunganan which would refer to decendants a long time removed.] see: kapunganan 1.

balungilit 1adj Cheerful. A person who is quick to laugh. Ka otow no balungilit, maga-an ogpakangisi ko ogpakakita to duma rin. Layun ogma-awang ka goinawa rin. Ogko-iling to warò igkasasow. A person who is cheerful is quick to laugh if he/she sees his/her companion(s). It's like he/she has no worries. 2n Kind of millet. [the head of which is multi-colored with a black and red design though the grains themselves are yellowish. When the grains are ripe they split open resembling a laugh so that is why this type is called balungilit which distinguishes it from other kinds of millet.]

bugsong v 1To obstruct, as a path or one's view. [DB comment regarding having words and meanings jumbled/pass by too quickly. (ck TA) DB contrasted this with a view from a mountain top that is unobstructed, straight and clear.] see: atang 2; ant: taloytoy. 2To be hindered as by clutter. Ko oghipanow ki diò to dalan no du-on kayu no napolod no konò ki ogpakabayò, nabugsongan ka ogbaya-an ta. Nabugsongan ka dalan su konad ogkabaya-an to otow. If we are walking on a path and there is a tree which has fallen and we cannot pass by, our pathway has been obstructed. Our path has been obstructed because people cannot get through.; DB 24/Feb/2009 Ko ogkabugsong, konò ta ogkakita-an ka ogkabaya-an. If something is cluttered, one cannot see where he is going. see: bunbun 1; ant: taloytoy1. 3To interrupt. Ko ogkagi a no du-on otow no ogtampod to kagi ku, ogbugsong. Ko og-ampawan din ka kagi rin, igdo-isok. If I am speaking and there is a person who cuts off my speech, he interrupts. If someone overrides [another's words] with his words, it is disrespectful to (lit. belittles) [the other person]. [as when a person's speech is interrupted] 4To be interrupted as of speech, or cut off as of electric current if uf a line has been broken Nabugsong ko du-on kinagian no konò ogka-ayun. [The meaning] is jumbled when there are words which don't fit. Ko du-on abogaru no ogkaro-og no warad igkatabak din, ogkabugsong on sikandin. see: tampod 1. 5To initiate. Ko oghunno-on og-unuk ka langlanguan, no ogbugsongan ka batò ka ogtulin. When the face [of a baby] fills in, then the child's growth is initiated. see: bunsud 1.

bungkù v 1To come to an end, limit; boundary. Ko hondo-i ogkataman ka hikot to asu, du-on dò ogbungkù. Wherever the tether of the dog ends, that is where he will be limited. Du-on otow no nalagak ka salapi din no darua no gatus. Nigbungkù dò du-on to namanghò di warò din on kita-a. There was a person ho lost two hundred [pesos] of his money. He came to an end of looking for it but didn't find it. 2Give up on someone or something, as when an action proves futile Ko du-on duma ta no du-on batasan no konò ogkabalowbalow, ogbungku-an tad ka og-anad kandin to maroyow. If we have a companion who has conduct which cannot be changed, we sgive up on teaching him [to do] good. 3To run out of options, as a doctor who cannot treat an illness. Nigbungku-an on to doctor si Ann Joy. Agad ko du-on ogkoimu on dan to ogpangabang, ogkamatoy rò sikandin. The doctor gran out of options for Ann Joy. Even if there was something they could do to save her, she would still die. see: tawad 1; see: taman 1. 4To allow to go so far and no farther such as when cutting a field. Ka otow no ogkakamot, du-on patamanan din ka ogpo-ilisan ka kamot din no ian ka pabungku-an to kamot din. A person who is making a field, has an ending of the edge of his field and that is how far he will ballow his field to extend. [It may not be the boundry of his property but it is the farthest extent to which he will have his field cut.] 4.1To set a limit. Ka lubid to asu ka ogpakabungkù oyow du-on dò ogkataman. The rope is that which is setting a limit it so that it will not go any farther.

dogkit 1v Side by side, close together; adjacent, as two fields. Du-on darua no otow no nokogdogkit ka kamot dan. There are two people who have made their fields to be adjacent. [When people make fields side by side, they often leave a space between them both for an area of shade, but also to keep the fire of one field from burning into the other if one person burns first. However, DB says sometimes two people will clear a wide field together and then divide it at the time of sowing seed. Those fields are also considered nokogdogkit “adjacent”. Also, there are those with adjacent fields who will clear the fields up to the edge of the other field. In that case they will burn both fields at once and divide them later.] see: longod 1; see fr.: dagkit. 2v To be reached set on fire as a field which is caught on fire by the embers of another field which is being burned. Ko hontow ka oghun-a no ogsilab, konò ogdogkitan ka dangob no kamot to hapuy. Whoever is first to burn [their field], [the fire] will not reach and set the other field on fire . [This is a dialectual variant used in Kapugi. Maambago, has dakitan for this meaning.] see: ; see: . (dial. var. dakit) 3v To lay something side by side near each other. 4To be side by side.
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