Search results for "liu"

magaliug 1n Visitor; guest. see fr.: panumbaloy. 2v To visit someone with a specific purpose in mind. [DB distinguishes between panumbaloy and ogmagaliug or nigmagaliug. The first is a more casual visit as to a friend one misses, whereas the latter is a visit with a specific purpose in mind.] see: panumbaloy.

agap 1v To race, involving just two people. Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Two people will race [each other] to return home. Nig-a-agap ka darua. The two people were racing [each other]. 2v To race one another, esp. of three or more people. Ka sikan no ogpa-ag-agapoy, li-agan. Ogtagù to saku no ogpallaguy. Ka ogpakaponga, ian ogpakaro-og. That [word] race each other is a game. They get in sacks and run. The one who is able to finish [first] is the one who wins. Ogpa-ag-agapoy ka mgo kuddò. The horses are racing each other. [such as in a game with multiple participants or when racing horses.] 3v To chase and catch up with someone or something. Ko du-on darua no ogpalawod no ka sagboka oghun-a, og-agapan ka oghun-a. If two [people] are going downriver [by raft/canoe] and one gets ahead, the other will chase and catch up with the one which got ahead. [The term agapan “catch up” includes the components of the words gapun “chase” and ogko-umaan “overtake”.] osyn: liu 1. 4vs To be overtaken and passed so that the other person will reach a destination ahead of him/her; beaten to a destination. Ko du-on taga Maguimon no ogligkat to Patil di nig-ulì on sikandan, no du-on nasinundul no og-ulì diò to Maambago, kagi sikandin to, “Ogka-agapan ka Usì.” Ogtabak ka taga Maguimon to, “Balagad. Hun-a ka rò du-on.” If there is someone from Maguimon who is leaving from Patil but he has left to return home, and there are others who have followed later who are returning to Maambago, they will say, “Usì, you will be inadvertently passed up.” The person from Maguimon will answer, “Nevermind. You just go on ahead.” Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Kagi to sagboka, “Ko ogka-agapan ka, koykow ka ogsakaru. Two were racing to return to the house. One said, “If you happen to be beaten [to the destination], you will be the one to fetch water.”

tibogow n 1A type of cane, that grows along the river. Ka woig no Liboganon, makopal ka mgo tibogow diò to napu no mabasag ka lawa rin. As for the Liboganon river, the cane is thick there in the flad area and its body is hard. [The young leaves and plant are eaten by animals but not people.] spec: liung, sasò, sawow, bungbung. 2A kind of shrimp which has hairs on claws. [They live where the tibogow cane has fallen into the river. They are red and white.] gen: ulobang.

alad 1n Fence or wall around a yard, house or garden Agad matikang woy ko masagkop, makopal woy ko manipis no igliu to baloy woy ko lama, ogkohingaranan no alad. Even if it is high or if it is short, thick or thin and surrounds a house or the yard, it is called an alad fense. [A wall around a yard or garden is not called an alabat “wall (of a house)” because by definition, an alabat requires a roof. If it is a wall that does not have a roof, it is an alad or fense.] 2v To make a fence 3v To fence something in. 4v For many to make a fense, esp. to trap wild pigs by fencing them in.

andal v 1To start as a machine or motor. 1.1To operate something such as to turn on, or play, a radio. Agboti nu to og-andal ka harayu. Turn up the volume (lit. operation of) the radio. 2To trigger, as a reaction or a memory. Inat to ogka-andalan ka doromdom ta. It is as though [something] triggers our thinking. see: ogka-alimotow. 3To get something started, such as to get a friend to come and eat Ko du-on magaliug noy, ko oghonatan to ko-onon, og-andalan ta to, “Usì, ogko-on kid on.” Oghinggaton tad to ogko-on kid. When we have guests, when the food is served, we get it started [by saying], “Friend, let’s eat now.” We are inviting [him] to come and eat (lit. that we-dual will eat). 4To release from mourning as to permit a widow to resume normal activities. Ko du-on ogkabalu, no tatolu on no allow no warò mokoipanow, ogkuò ki to manggad no igmaganangon ta to litos to oglo-ug kad on to so-in no manggad no ig-andal ku koykow to warò og-ogot koykow su nigbo-otan ku to nig-andal. If someone has become widowed and for three days has not been able to go out [of the house] (lit. walk), we get a piece of cloth/clothing by which we signify that it is OK now for you to run errands as this clothing is what I use to release you because I have decided to release [you]. [Typically, a widow is given something, such as an item of clothing to indicate that she is released from mourning and may resume her normal activities. Similar restrictions apply to widowers but are often less severe than those applied to widows.] 4.1To cause someone to be released from mourning. Og-andalan ta to manggad. We release [her] with [an item of] clothing to resume normal activity.

balow v 1To welcome and gather information from a guest. Ka tagbanua, nig-agpas no nigtagbu to magaliug no nigdatong to baloy rin. No nigbalowbalow ka nigpanangnangonoy. The host hurried to meet the guest who arrived at his house and he welcomed and gathered information [from him] as they talked with one another. [which includes the initial gathering of information when a visitor first arrives such as finding out a person's name, where he/she has come from, whether he/she eaten, etc. Unless the guest is in a hurry, further discussion (alukuyon) about the purpose of the guest's visit will wait until after a meal has been served and eaten.] 2Repair, change, amend, redo.