Search results for "magalat"

kopal 1adj Thick, as the two sides of a book, a piece of clothing, or paper. Makopal ka kinabò. The shirt is thick. ant: manipis. 2adj Thick, as hair when there is a lot of it. Makopal ka bulbul. Oglituk to dakol lagboy ka bulbul din woy malapung His/her hair is thick. It means that he has a lot of hair and plentiful. 3adj Having a small amount of liquid so that many particles are close together such as a lot of powdered milk added to a small amount of water. Makopal ka gatas su og-anlod ka gatas ko ogtunawon to woig. The milk is thick because the milk sinks to the bottom if it is dissolved/suspended in water. 4adj Close together as forest where are many trees and much vegetation. Makopal ka mgo tibogow diò to napù no mabasag ka lawa rin. [The tibogow is dense there in the flat area and its body is hard.] ant: magalat; see: sokol. 5adj To be volumic, that is, both wide and have much content, as as a field with much vegetation. Makopal ka tira-an. Maluag, mgo lalimma no hitaria bua to ogpamula-an. Sikan dò ka impamula; warò solug no duma. The sugarcane field is capacious. It is wide, about five hetares maybe which has been planted. That is all that has been planted; there is no mixture of anything else. 6adj Many such as flies or lice which which cover a sore. Makopal to kutu. Ogkito-on ka kutu woy ogkogangon ka batò. The lice are many. The lice are visible and the child is covered with sores. Makopal ka langow no oghulun to pa-a. The flies are thick which are swarming on [a someone’s] foot. see: moon-ing. 7adv Thicker [than something else]; thickest Mamakopal ka laplap to kalabow. The carabao's skin is thicker [than the shirt]. 8deriv n thickness Ko og-otian ka nigsamba no woig, songo dangow ka kapokali to danlak. When the flooded [river] water has receeded, the thickness of the silt is a handspan deep.

awang phr.: ogma-awang to goinawa. 1adj Light, as that of a lamp, or sun. Ka goinawa ran, ogpoko-uma sikandan to ma-awang pad. . It was their desire (lit. breath) to arrive while it was still light. Ko du-on manggad no manipis, mo-ilag ka pogpitow ta su oglagbas ka ma-awang. If there is thin materials, it is show-through because light goes through it. Ka allow, ogbogoy to layag to ma-awang. As for the sun, it produces (lit. gives) rays of light. see fr.: ilag 2; osyn: ting-ow 1, ilag 1; see fr.: ilag 3. 1.1phrase To be free of apprehension; peaceful. With negative, to be unpeaceful. Ka sikan no ma-agkap so goinawa ta, ogkalituk to, ma-awang ka goinawa ta. Ogpakasalig ki kandin. When we feel OK about something (lit. as for our breath which is light-weight), it means that we are free of apprehension (lit. our breath is clear). Ka sikan no ogka-aras, lagboy no konò ogma-awang ka goinawa rin. As for that being frustrated, she was definitely not at peace (lit. her breath was especially not clear/peaceful). 1.2v To be clear, sediment free. Ka woig no mating-ow, mo-ilag dod. Ka mating-ow woy ka ma-awang, warò ogpaka-atang. Water which is sediment free, is also transparent. That which is sediment free and that which is clear have nothing obstructing the light. 1.3adj (Fig) Clear, as of understanding, comprehension. Ogmataloytoy, matul-id woy ma-awang ka pogsabut ta. The meaning is uncluttered, straight and our understanding [of the words] is clear. 1.4adj Empty, as an open space. Du-on batò no magalat ka ngipon din. Ka ngipon din, du-on olatan no ma-awang. There is a child whose teeth are far apart. His teeth have an gap between them which is open. 1.4.1adj Open or unobstructed, as when a roof has been blown off. 1.5v [A command] to clear [something] of debris or make something which has been said more understandable. 2v To clear or become sediment free like water in a spring fed pool clears after rain has muddied the water. 3v To make free of clutter. 3.1v To say or do something to prevent, or clear away a harmful situation. [When a misfortune such as an injury or illness happens to someone, others will put index finger between lips, spit and say ‘pa-awang’, pointing to the ground, so that the same thing won’t happen to them.]

galat₁ 1adj Wide-spread, far apart. Du-on batò no magalat ka ngipon din. Ka ngipon din, du-on olatan no ma-awang. There is a child whose teeth are far apart. His teeth have open spaces between them. [Does not mean loose as an item of clothing that is too big.] see fr.: tago-urò. 1.1adj Loosely woven, not close together Ko oghimu ka to bogyas, magalat. Magalat ka lawa to bogyas; magalat ka galow. When you make a fish trap, it is loosely woven. The body of the fishtrap is loosely woven and the prongs are also far apart. [Fish traps, nets and screen are all magalat because there is space between the strands of rattan, nylon or wire. These items are built strongly, the pieces intertwined but not solid.] 2v To leave behind in someone's care, esp. of a child Ko oglo-ug ka inoy to batò no oghilamon, ipagalat din ka anak din diò to songo otow no ian ka ogtamong. When the mother of a child goes to weed [her field], she leaves her child in the care of someone else and that person watches over him/her. 3v To take care of someone left behind Si Taganay ka niggalatan to anak ni Lita. Taganay is the one who took care of Lita's children who were left behind. 4v To leave something behind for someone, such as food for a child Ka inoy, oggalatan to homoy no igpalugaw no igpako-on to anak din. A mother leaves rice behind for gruel to be fed to her child. 5vs To leave behind (involuntarily) Ko ogkamatoy ki, ka mgo kalaglagan ta ogkaggalat dò no konò ta ogka-alap diò to kamatayon. When we die, our possessions are simply left behind and cannot be taken where we will be after we die.