Search results for "moon-ing"

moon-ing see fr.: kopal 6.

kopal 1adj Thick, as the two sides of a book, a piece of clothing, or paper. Makopal ka kinabò. The shirt is thick. ant: manipis. 2adj Thick, as hair when there is a lot of it. Makopal ka bulbul. Oglituk to dakol lagboy ka bulbul din woy malapung His/her hair is thick. It means that he has a lot of hair and plentiful. 3adj Having a small amount of liquid so that many particles are close together such as a lot of powdered milk added to a small amount of water. Makopal ka gatas su og-anlod ka gatas ko ogtunawon to woig. The milk is thick because the milk sinks to the bottom if it is dissolved/suspended in water. 4adj Close together as forest where are many trees and much vegetation. Makopal ka mgo tibogow diò to napù no mabasag ka lawa rin. [The tibogow is dense there in the flat area and its body is hard.] ant: magalat; see: sokol. 5adj To be volumic, that is, both wide and have much content, as as a field with much vegetation. Makopal ka tira-an. Maluag, mgo lalimma no hitaria bua to ogpamula-an. Sikan dò ka impamula; warò solug no duma. The sugarcane field is capacious. It is wide, about five hetares maybe which has been planted. That is all that has been planted; there is no mixture of anything else. 6adj Many such as flies or lice which which cover a sore. Makopal to kutu. Ogkito-on ka kutu woy ogkogangon ka batò. The lice are many. The lice are visible and the child is covered with sores. Makopal ka langow no oghulun to pa-a. The flies are thick which are swarming on [a someone’s] foot. see: moon-ing. 7adv Thicker [than something else]; thickest Mamakopal ka laplap to kalabow. The carabao's skin is thicker [than the shirt]. 8deriv n thickness Ko og-otian ka nigsamba no woig, songo dangow ka kapokali to danlak. When the flooded [river] water has receeded, the thickness of the silt is a handspan deep.

alibutod n White grubs. Oggusi-on tad ka galung ta no pula no ogkito-on tad ka moon-ing no alibutod no og-aliboodbood on. We split oven the pula palm tree which we have notched and then we see many white grubs which are wiggling about. [These are hatched from the eggs of the kamolung beetles which may be black, brown, reddish, or green. The grubs are cultivated by felling a palm tree with an edible heart such as the pula palm. The palm tree is felled and the palm heart ubud is removed from the upper portion of the tree near the leaves to be used for food. Then the tree is grooved at intervals of about one arm span. It is then covered with leaves and left for about three months. Beetles lay their eggs in the grooves and the larva feed on the pulp lisuan of the tree. When someone comes back to check the tree, he taps it to see if the grubs have developed and filled the pulp of the tree. If they have, the creatures will make a whispery na-asna-as sound. The tree trunk will be split open and the grubs collected which are cooked and eaten. They are described as consisting almost entirely of fat. However, not everyone eats them.] spec: kanggò; spec: katod; spec: langi-on.

alig 1n Attraction, especially toward someone of the opposite sex. Ko ogko-iniat ki to boi to sikan ki pad nigkita, sikan ka alig pad to mata su ko konò tad ogkito-on ka sikan no boi, ogkalingawan ta sikandin. If we desire a girl when this is the first time we have seen her, that is the attraction of the eye(s) because if we don't see that girl [any more], we will just forget about her. Ka sikan no alig, konò no maro-ot su ko ogkita ki to boi no du-on goinawa ta kandin di mangkuan ogkasipod ki no ognangon to du-on goinawa ta kandin. Konò no ian ta ig-alig su oghimu ki to maro-ot. That [kind] of attraction isn't bad because when we see a girl and we like her (lit. have breath toward her), yet later on we will be shy to say that we like her. Our attraction isn't a means of attraction to for doing (lit.because we will do) something wrong. [The unreduplicated form of the word alig is described as not a bad emotion because a person is just interested in that person, but the initial interest may pass. That interest can grow into an appropriate relationship leading toward marriage. However, a person who is described as aligon is someone whose interest goes beyond the appropriate. Those people may desire someone who is married and may not be limited to one relationship.] 2v To be drawn to someone, as to God. Ko nig-alig ki to Magbobo-ot, indakoli ki to goinawa to Magbobo-ot. Kandin dò ka nig-alig. When we were drawn to God, our love (lit. breath) for God was increased. He alone was the one who drew us [to Himself]. 3v Affection for someone. Natapid ka pog-alig din no du-on on dakol no goinawa rin. Ka sikan no alig, sagboka rò no boi ka indakoli rin. Sikan ka ligkatan to og-asawo-on din. His affection for someone has become focused (lit. arranged). As for that affection, there is just one girl whom he loves. That is the source of his getting married [to her]. 4vs To be attracted by something such as a pretty design. Ogka-aligan ta ka maroyow no batok. We are attracted by the pretty design. 5v To make a commitment to one another as two who decide to get married. Nig-a-alig sikandan su nokog-un-unawa goinawa ran. Nokogsabut ka sikan. Nokog-iniatoy. Nokogso-ob ka alig dan no darua. They have made a commitment [to each other] because their feelings (lit. breath) werere the same. They have come to an agreement with each other. They desire each other. The attraction of the two [of them] is mutual. 6deriv n A lustful person. Ka otow no ogko-iniat to moon-ing no boi, sikan ka aligon. The person who desires many women, that is a lustful person. 7v To lust after others of opposite sex, not one's spouse. Ko du-on asawa woy ko dalaga, tibò din og-aligon. Whether it is a person who has a spouse or an unmarried lady, he lusts after all [of them].

alik-ik n 1A kind of green and white stripped leaf used to wrap corn for steaming. Moon-ing ka alik-ik diò to kanami no mabatok di konò ogkagamit to igbaakì to agoloy. Ian dò ogkagamit ka alik-ik no mo-ilow. There are many kinds of varigated alik-ik plants in our place they are not used to make steamed bread from corn. The only kind that is used is the green alik-ik plant. [There are many kinds of leaves called alik-ik but not all of them are used for wrapping and steaming young corn. The leaf used for making a type of steamed corn bread is a green and white stripped leaf found in the forest. Other varigated varieties are considered to be pretty and are used as decorative plants. It is uncertain if these could be used in cooking.] 2Small grained rice.

bawì v To miraculously heal. Moon-ing ka nabawi-an ni Hisus. Jesus miraculously healed many people [As when a shaman goes into trance and plead to spirits on behalf of the sick. Also applies to Jesus' miracles of healing]

buga n 1Offspring of a mudfish Ka isda no alu-an. moon-ing ka mgo buga rin ka og-anak kandan. As for the fish which is a madfish, many are its offspring when it gives birth. [The mudfish lays burì fisheggs.] 2Name of a linow deep pool, two streams and a village which is by a this deep pool, so named because there were many offspring of the alu-an mudfish in it.