Search results for "nangon"

nangon 1n A message, especially by word of mouth. Du-on nigbogoy koddì to sulat. Kagi to sika otow no nigtilala ku, “Igpa-alap ku bag no nangon to og-uroik a diò to Maambago.” Someone gave me a letter. That person whom I knew said, “I'm sending a message please that I will travel upriver to Maambago.” Ko nigbogoy to sulat, nigpatimul to nangon no igpasiguru no ogpasabuk bag to agoloy. When he gave the letter [to me], he instructed (lit. caused) [me] to add to it by word of mouth to insure that [the person] would set aside some corn [for him]. see fr.: gugud 2; see fr.: lalag 2. 2v To tell, say, speak Di du-on og-abalang no konò ogpoko-uwang ko ognangon. But there are those who keep coming back with their request who cannot express what they [want to] say. Og-agbotan nu to ognangon oyow lagboy ogpakarinog ka duma. [Speak] louder when you speak so that the others can hear. see fr.: gugud 1. 3Si Lita, nignangon ki Mery to diò oghibat to kandin. Lita told Mery that she would sleep at her [place]. 4Agad nokoy ka ignangon ku, konò ogpa-agad-agad no og-ugpò diò to dangob no anak din. No matter what I say, [my mother] won't agree to stay with her other offspring. 4.1Warò ikanangon dan to duma no kinagian. They weren't able to tell me another word [for the word aguanta “endure”.] 5Tell. [This word can be used in direct or indirect speech, with or without an object. The English word “tell” requires an object and is also used in indirect speech.] 6Ognangonan kow rò ko ogkapalusan on. You will be told when [the grains] have filled out. 7v Repeatedly ?? tell Si Apù Amasig ka nignangonnangon kanak to ogngilam ki su du-on ogpoko-uma no mangayow. Grandfather Amasig was the one who was repeatedly telling me that we will be alert because raiders would come. 8To plan. 9n guarantee (lit. something used to tell) Ko du-on og-indanan ku no kuddò, ogbogoy a to babuy no igpohun-a ku. Sikan ka igmaganangon ku to og-indanan kud on. If there is a horse which I will reserve, I will give a pig as a downpayment (lit. that which I [give] ahead of time). That is my guarantee that I have reserved it.

batad₂ v Converse as to ask each other questions about family. [contrasts with al-alukuyan which involves discussion of more serious issues.] see: panangnangonoy.

indan phr.: Indanan nu man... 1v To remember Og-indanan to mgo batò ko hondo-i ogtugpa ka batu no intugdò dan. The children remember where the stone went down that they threw. see fr.: maningkalagan 2; osyn: pulù 5; see fr.: maningkalagan 1; see fr.: abin 1.1; see fr.: igmaganangon. 2v To reserve. Ko du-on og-indanan ku no kuddò, ogbogoy a to babuy no igpohun-a ku. Sikan ka igmaganangon ku to og-indanan kud on. If there is a horse which I will reserve, I will give a pig as a downpayment (lit. that which I [give] ahead of time). That is my guarantee that I have reserved it. see fr.: hikot 3; see fr.: bakos. 3v establish Ka inggasap no bulu no malintok, sikan ka igsokod to baloybaloy oyow ogko-indanan ko hondo-i ka mgo sinabong woy ka balokun woy ka pusina. The small [pieces of] bamboo which were cut, those were used to measure the diagram of the house to establish where the rooms, the porch and the kitchen will be. 4v set, as a date Ko ogkabatukan ta ka pitsa no du-on liwak, og-indanan ta ka sikan no allow no oglibulung. When we have discovered the date which is open (lit. has room), we set that day for gathering together. [Although the example of reserving a horse and setting a date seem similar, DB sees them as different because one chooses a date because of something important. Also, to reserve a horse is like “putting dibs on” that horse - there is a payment and if the terms of agreement are not met, you won't get the horse. There is no payment involved in setting a date (or “reserving” a day)] 5v That which is used to guarantee. Woy nu ogkapurut ko du-on on ka ig-indan no oghimu to sabut ko kon-u ogkagampusi -- ka ogkatibò on ka igbayad. You won't be able to take it until there is something to use as a guarantee which makes the agreement about when you will pay the remainder -- when [you] pay in full. see: maganangon 1. 6v To promise 7v signify Du-on uran no ogngaranan noy no saginwalu. Sikan ka indanan noy no wawalu no allow ka ungod og-uran. There is [a kind of rain] which we call saginwalu. That signifies to us that it will constantly rain for eight days. 8v To reserve or engage. 9n A sign, something used to signify something Ko du-on sagboka no batò no ungod ogsinogow, sikan ka pog-indan to du-on ogpoko-uma no mangayow. If there is a child who is always crying, that is a sign that raiders will arrive.

lalag 1v To tell something to someone.[converse, discuss] (esp Tigwa) [Tigwanan for nangon, “tell”.] 2see: nangon 1.

malogot 1adj True, correct Ko nalugoy on no ungod kandin ogpanakow, natagaan on to mgo otow no malogot to kandin ka nigpurut. When it had been a long time and he was repeatedly stealing, it became known by the people that it was true that he was the one who had taken [things]. [This is often used as a response to verify that something stated is true or correct. It is also used when evidence has shown something to be true as in the following example.] see fr.: tigus 1. 2v to verify, witness to, or testify that something truly happened, or was done Ogpakanangonnangon koy to igmalogot. We have to tell that which will verify [that something is true]. Ogpakapamalogot ko tu-tu-u to pigsabukan to gamut. [One needs] to prove whether it is ture that someone was poisoned. 3v to use something as a token or guarantee [Buntit gave a bolo to Buliung to verify that she was having him build her house and to guarantee that she would pay him for that task. ck LA re interpretation of text. (text BB Sent. 28 uses andal but it is in same context. ck TA)] see: igmaganangon.

agpot 1n To be an outsider , that is, someone who is living in a location other than his own. Ko oghalin ki diò songo ugpa-an, mgo agpot ki rò. Agad duma ta no Manobò, mgo agpot ki rod su konò no ugpa-an ta. If we move to another place, we are just outsiders. Even if they are our fellow Manobos, we are still outsiders because it is not our place. ant: sakup 2. 2n Foreigner, that is, someone who resides in a country where he/she is not a citizen. Ogkohingaran to agpot kow kai to Pilipinas su sakup ka to songo ugpa-an. You are called foreigners here in the Philippines because you are subjects of another country. 3n A person who lives on someone else's property; displaced person. Ko warò tanò dan, mgo agpot sikandan. If they don't have land they are residing on someone else's land. [The Ata Manobo term agpot applies to a renter or someone who has permission to live on someone else's land. It does not have the negative connotation of the English term “squatter”. However, the people who dwell on a dump would be considered agpot because it is not considered that it is an appropriate place to live.] 4v To go somewhere for a short stay. Si Lita, nignangon ki Mery to diò oghibat to kandin. Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Lita told Mery to sleep (lit. lay down) at their place. Mery stayed a short time with them because she joined [them] for only one night. [In the following example, DB says the verbal form applies but Mary is not an agpot because she only stayed one night.] see: panumbaloy. 5n To be temporary residents of some place Mgo agpot ki rò kai to tanò. We are just resident aliens here on earth. Ko malayat ka pog-ugpò nu, sikan ka agpot su nig-amut ka. If your stay is long, that is the meaning of an resident alien because you have joined in [with those people]. [DB says the word can mean amut if it is in a temporary sense. See example. [original gloss: Mingle with.]] osyn: amut 1. 6v To stay somewhere for a short time Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Mary stayed for a short time because she joined [them] for only one night. [In this case, a person does not become an agpot “alien” or “foreigner” because the intent is just a short visit.]

alig 1n Attraction, especially toward someone of the opposite sex. Ko ogko-iniat ki to boi to sikan ki pad nigkita, sikan ka alig pad to mata su ko konò tad ogkito-on ka sikan no boi, ogkalingawan ta sikandin. If we desire a girl when this is the first time we have seen her, that is the attraction of the eye(s) because if we don't see that girl [any more], we will just forget about her. Ka sikan no alig, konò no maro-ot su ko ogkita ki to boi no du-on goinawa ta kandin di mangkuan ogkasipod ki no ognangon to du-on goinawa ta kandin. Konò no ian ta ig-alig su oghimu ki to maro-ot. That [kind] of attraction isn't bad because when we see a girl and we like her (lit. have breath toward her), yet later on we will be shy to say that we like her. Our attraction isn't a means of attraction to for doing (lit.because we will do) something wrong. [The unreduplicated form of the word alig is described as not a bad emotion because a person is just interested in that person, but the initial interest may pass. That interest can grow into an appropriate relationship leading toward marriage. However, a person who is described as aligon is someone whose interest goes beyond the appropriate. Those people may desire someone who is married and may not be limited to one relationship.] 2v To be drawn to someone, as to God. Ko nig-alig ki to Magbobo-ot, indakoli ki to goinawa to Magbobo-ot. Kandin dò ka nig-alig. When we were drawn to God, our love (lit. breath) for God was increased. He alone was the one who drew us [to Himself]. 3v Affection for someone. Natapid ka pog-alig din no du-on on dakol no goinawa rin. Ka sikan no alig, sagboka rò no boi ka indakoli rin. Sikan ka ligkatan to og-asawo-on din. His affection for someone has become focused (lit. arranged). As for that affection, there is just one girl whom he loves. That is the source of his getting married [to her]. 4vs To be attracted by something such as a pretty design. Ogka-aligan ta ka maroyow no batok. We are attracted by the pretty design. 5v To make a commitment to one another as two who decide to get married. Nig-a-alig sikandan su nokog-un-unawa goinawa ran. Nokogsabut ka sikan. Nokog-iniatoy. Nokogso-ob ka alig dan no darua. They have made a commitment [to each other] because their feelings (lit. breath) werere the same. They have come to an agreement with each other. They desire each other. The attraction of the two [of them] is mutual. 6deriv n A lustful person. Ka otow no ogko-iniat to moon-ing no boi, sikan ka aligon. The person who desires many women, that is a lustful person. 7v To lust after others of opposite sex, not one's spouse. Ko du-on asawa woy ko dalaga, tibò din og-aligon. Whether it is a person who has a spouse or an unmarried lady, he lusts after all [of them].

alukuy 1n A friend. 2v To discuss something with someone else. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone desires to get married, he will pursue it. He will continuously discuss it with the father [of the girl] until he agrees (lit says “yes”). [This word seems to apply to discussion of specific issues and not to casual conversation. Ogpanangnangonoy seems to apply more correctly to casual conversation and exchange of general information.] 2.1v The thing which is being discussed. Ian dò ogka-alukuy ko songo monu ka igbotad no gastu to sikan no boi. The only thing they will be discussing is how much they will pay immediately upon request as a brideprice for that girl. 2.2v That which is discussed; topic of discussion. Ko du-on otow no og-utang di ogkasipod no ognangon, di songo otow on ka ognangonan din. Ogkagi to sikan no otow to, “Du-on ig-alukuy din koykow.” If there is a person who [wants to] borrow get something on credit but is ashamed to speak up, then he will tell another person. That person will say, “He has something to discuss with you.” 2.3v To have a group discussion. Ogma-al-alukuyoy ka mgo buyag tongod ko du-on mgo lupuganon. The leaders are having a group discussion about whether there will be [eventual] reciprocal exhanges for a brideprice. 3deriv n Discussion. Ian on amoy-amoy ka ogtangkò to alukuyan. The person who speaks on behalf of the man is the spokesman for the discussion (lit. one who faces the discussion). [In a wedding arrangement, the spokesman for the man is called an amoy-amoy (a term used for an adoptive or foster father).] 4deriv n A friendship gift. Pal-alukuyan dan. [It is] their friendship gift.

andal v 1To start as a machine or motor. 1.1To operate something such as to turn on, or play, a radio. Agboti nu to og-andal ka harayu. Turn up the volume (lit. operation of) the radio. 2To trigger, as a reaction or a memory. Inat to ogka-andalan ka doromdom ta. It is as though [something] triggers our thinking. see: ogka-alimotow. 3To get something started, such as to get a friend to come and eat Ko du-on magaliug noy, ko oghonatan to ko-onon, og-andalan ta to, “Usì, ogko-on kid on.” Oghinggaton tad to ogko-on kid. When we have guests, when the food is served, we get it started [by saying], “Friend, let’s eat now.” We are inviting [him] to come and eat (lit. that we-dual will eat). 4To release from mourning as to permit a widow to resume normal activities. Ko du-on ogkabalu, no tatolu on no allow no warò mokoipanow, ogkuò ki to manggad no igmaganangon ta to litos to oglo-ug kad on to so-in no manggad no ig-andal ku koykow to warò og-ogot koykow su nigbo-otan ku to nig-andal. If someone has become widowed and for three days has not been able to go out [of the house] (lit. walk), we get a piece of cloth/clothing by which we signify that it is OK now for you to run errands as this clothing is what I use to release you because I have decided to release [you]. [Typically, a widow is given something, such as an item of clothing to indicate that she is released from mourning and may resume her normal activities. Similar restrictions apply to widowers but are often less severe than those applied to widows.] 4.1To cause someone to be released from mourning. Og-andalan ta to manggad. We release [her] with [an item of] clothing to resume normal activity.