Search results for "olat"

olatan see fr.: tongà 3.1.

pulù 1n The very top of the head where hair parts in different directions. [Some people have two or three places where the hair parts in different directions.] 2n Island. Pulù ka Cebu su tibò woig ka ilis. Cebu is an island because its edge is all water. [A pulù “island” is a portion of land which is isolated from other land by water. If a portion of land has become isolated from the rest by a flood, it is napulù.] 3v To become isolated, such as land which has been separated from other land. by water. Ko du-on tanò no nasamò to woig no nigsamba, sikan ka napulù. If there is land which is left over by water which has flooded, that is what has become isolated. Ka tanò no Mindanao, su nalingutan to dagat, napulù no tanò The land of Mindanao, because it is surrounded by the ocean, it is isolated from the land. 4v A leftover section, such as of field not yet weeded or harvested. Songo lian na-an dò ko kapulù. When the leftover section [is harvested] there will be just one basketful left [to be gathered]. [DB said in the following example, it seems the people have purposed to leave a section.] osyn: samò. 5v To section off, as a portion of land. Ko du-on ogsamo-on ta no ogboni-on, ogpulù ki diò to ilis ka maroyow no ogkabonì. If we have [a part of the field] which we will leave over, we will isection off that good part near the edge [of the field] for seed. Kagi to songo otow to, “Maniò to so-ini no nig-alad?” Ogtabak koy to, “Nigpulù noy su ogboni-on.” A person says, “Why is this fense [here]” We will reply, “We have sectioned it off for seed (lit. because it will be seed.) osyn: indan 1. 6num Ten. 7Tenth. 8Ten days.

awang phr.: ogma-awang to goinawa. 1adj Light, as that of a lamp, or sun. Ka goinawa ran, ogpoko-uma sikandan to ma-awang pad. . It was their desire (lit. breath) to arrive while it was still light. Ko du-on manggad no manipis, mo-ilag ka pogpitow ta su oglagbas ka ma-awang. If there is thin materials, it is show-through because light goes through it. Ka allow, ogbogoy to layag to ma-awang. As for the sun, it produces (lit. gives) rays of light. see fr.: ilag 2; osyn: ting-ow 1, ilag 1; see fr.: ilag 3. 1.1phrase To be free of apprehension; peaceful. With negative, to be unpeaceful. Ka sikan no ma-agkap so goinawa ta, ogkalituk to, ma-awang ka goinawa ta. Ogpakasalig ki kandin. When we feel OK about something (lit. as for our breath which is light-weight), it means that we are free of apprehension (lit. our breath is clear). Ka sikan no ogka-aras, lagboy no konò ogma-awang ka goinawa rin. As for that being frustrated, she was definitely not at peace (lit. her breath was especially not clear/peaceful). 1.2v To be clear, sediment free. Ka woig no mating-ow, mo-ilag dod. Ka mating-ow woy ka ma-awang, warò ogpaka-atang. Water which is sediment free, is also transparent. That which is sediment free and that which is clear have nothing obstructing the light. 1.3adj (Fig) Clear, as of understanding, comprehension. Ogmataloytoy, matul-id woy ma-awang ka pogsabut ta. The meaning is uncluttered, straight and our understanding [of the words] is clear. 1.4adj Empty, as an open space. Du-on batò no magalat ka ngipon din. Ka ngipon din, du-on olatan no ma-awang. There is a child whose teeth are far apart. His teeth have an gap between them which is open. 1.4.1adj Open or unobstructed, as when a roof has been blown off. 1.5v [A command] to clear [something] of debris or make something which has been said more understandable. 2v To clear or become sediment free like water in a spring fed pool clears after rain has muddied the water. 3v To make free of clutter. 3.1v To say or do something to prevent, or clear away a harmful situation. [When a misfortune such as an injury or illness happens to someone, others will put index finger between lips, spit and say ‘pa-awang’, pointing to the ground, so that the same thing won’t happen to them.]

galat₁ 1adj Wide-spread, far apart. Du-on batò no magalat ka ngipon din. Ka ngipon din, du-on olatan no ma-awang. There is a child whose teeth are far apart. His teeth have open spaces between them. [Does not mean loose as an item of clothing that is too big.] see fr.: tago-urò. 1.1adj Loosely woven, not close together Ko oghimu ka to bogyas, magalat. Magalat ka lawa to bogyas; magalat ka galow. When you make a fish trap, it is loosely woven. The body of the fishtrap is loosely woven and the prongs are also far apart. [Fish traps, nets and screen are all magalat because there is space between the strands of rattan, nylon or wire. These items are built strongly, the pieces intertwined but not solid.] 2v To leave behind in someone's care, esp. of a child Ko oglo-ug ka inoy to batò no oghilamon, ipagalat din ka anak din diò to songo otow no ian ka ogtamong. When the mother of a child goes to weed [her field], she leaves her child in the care of someone else and that person watches over him/her. 3v To take care of someone left behind Si Taganay ka niggalatan to anak ni Lita. Taganay is the one who took care of Lita's children who were left behind. 4v To leave something behind for someone, such as food for a child Ka inoy, oggalatan to homoy no igpalugaw no igpako-on to anak din. A mother leaves rice behind for gruel to be fed to her child. 5vs To leave behind (involuntarily) Ko ogkamatoy ki, ka mgo kalaglagan ta ogkaggalat dò no konò ta ogka-alap diò to kamatayon. When we die, our possessions are simply left behind and cannot be taken where we will be after we die.

lawang 1v To go down a creek to a river junction. Ko oglaras ki to bo-ogan, oglawang ki to tugda-an no oglapas ki to Liboganan. When we go down a creek [either by foot or by raft], we reach/end up at the river junction and then we cross over the Liboganon [River]. [The underlying meaning of lawang seems to be for two things to come together. In the first example the meaning includes travel to the tugda-an “junction” where the creek comes together with the river. (DB says that one doesn't use the term lawang for crossing a river unless ogdakol ka woig “the water is high”.)] 2v To break through, as of the space between two fields. Di ka olatan dan, warò dan poglawang to pogkamot. Warò dan pogtomua to pogkamot. But in cutting, they have not broken through the space between them. They have not joined the two fields by cutting. [When people make fields side by side, they often do not clear the space between them so the two fields will not be joined. The purpose is to prevent the fire of one field from burning into the other if one person burns first.] see: lagbas. 3join Ko nigkamot ka diò limang to bubungan no nakagomow kad diò to songo du-on kamot, nokoglawang ka to olin kamot. Nokogtomu on. If you cut a field on one side of a mountain and happened to go over the summit to another person who had a field, you would have joined the two fields. They would have come together. see: tomu 1. 4v To have network of connections Ka mgo lugì to tabunan to takubung, ogpoglawanglawangon diò to diralom to oghimuan dan to salag. The holes of the marmot’s mound is connected underneath to the places where they make their nests. [This contrasts with the above example of the fields being joined because the fields do not have a network of connections between them.] see: sumpul. 5v To pass through, or cross over to the other side, as of a river. Ko niglanog ka Liboganon, oglawangon ta rò to oglapas to woig to ogpangali to mundù. When the Liboganon River floods, we just pass through it to cross to the other side of the river to dig camotes. Usì, maniò to nakalawang ka to dakol ka lanog? Friend why did you have to cross over [the river] when the flooding was excessive? Ogpakalawang ka to sikan no woig ko ogbayò ka to tulay. You cross over that river when you pass across a bridge. [One can cross a swollen river by wading, swimming or using some conveyance. The sense is that one traverses and comes out on the other side.] 6v To cross over each other as bridges of highways that pass over each other. Ogpokoglawanglawan ka mgo tulay to mgo kalasara. The bridges of the highways cross over each other.

olog 1n For something to be fitting or OK with someone, to be the right fit or size, or to be possible or appropriate for a specific occasion or use. Olog nu bua ka so-ini no kinabò. Perhaps this is your size. see: karakoli; see fr.: ongod 2; see fr.: togkad 3. 2adv Possibly Olog bua ko ogpakasamboy a to kuddò nu su oghondiò a to Patil su ogboli a to tambal. Maybe it's a possible that I could borrow your horse because I will go to Patil because I will buy medicine. Konò no olog to ogkasambayan su masakit so pa-a to kuddò. It's not possible to borrow it because the horse's foot is sore. [That is, OK with someone.] 3n Enough, adequate Olog nud ka so-ini no salapì to ogpoko-uma ka diò to Davao. This money is adequate for you to reach Davao. Ka igkarangob on ka no-olog on to nakaboli. The next year the [amount of] corn was enough that it could be sold. see: litos 1. 4n When preceded by ian, it means, the very thing which is fitting for some purpose. Ka mgo bo-ugan, ian olog no litos to sikan ka ogkoimu no maroyow no indanan to olatan to kara tanò no du-on mgo kamunoy. A creek is the very thing which is appropriate to be that which can be made the marker between two fields which have [different] owners. DB Dic Nt May/2006 5v To fit Ka an-anayan no turukan to agoloy ku, katoluan dò no saku ka no-olog to sikan no pinayag ku. From my first corn harvest, only thirty sacks fit in my granary. 6v To be suitable, OK, fitting Du-on otow no ogko-iniat to bogyas. Og-insò to, “Ogko-olog bua to goinawa nu ko ogsaliuan ku to manuk?” There is a person who wants to buy a fish trap. He will ask, “Maybe it is OK with you (lit. suitable to your breath) if I trade a chicken for it?” 7v To try. Ka so-ini no simana to katamanan to Mayo, og-olog-olog a porom to og-ulì diò to Maambago, di nig-ugsul on ka mgo pilitianan to mgo sakayan. This week at the end?? of May, I would like to try to return to Maambago, but the fares to the vehicles have gone up. Sikan ian ogtimulan ta pad ka salapi ku oyow og-olog-olog to pogdatong dio to Maambago. That's why we will increase [the amount of] my money so that it will be enough to arrive at Maambago. 8v test Kò nu og-ol-ologi ka inoy nu su maro-ot. Don't test your mother because it's bad. [If a child disobeyed his mother to go to swim in a deep place someone would say:] 9vs To fit