Search results for "pa-a"

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

agap 1v To race, involving just two people. Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Two people will race [each other] to return home. Nig-a-agap ka darua. The two people were racing [each other]. 2v To race one another, esp. of three or more people. Ka sikan no ogpa-ag-agapoy, li-agan. Ogtagù to saku no ogpallaguy. Ka ogpakaponga, ian ogpakaro-og. That [word] race each other is a game. They get in sacks and run. The one who is able to finish [first] is the one who wins. Ogpa-ag-agapoy ka mgo kuddò. The horses are racing each other. [such as in a game with multiple participants or when racing horses.] 3v To chase and catch up with someone or something. Ko du-on darua no ogpalawod no ka sagboka oghun-a, og-agapan ka oghun-a. If two [people] are going downriver [by raft/canoe] and one gets ahead, the other will chase and catch up with the one which got ahead. [The term agapan “catch up” includes the components of the words gapun “chase” and ogko-umaan “overtake”.] osyn: liu 1. 4vs To be overtaken and passed so that the other person will reach a destination ahead of him/her; beaten to a destination. Ko du-on taga Maguimon no ogligkat to Patil di nig-ulì on sikandan, no du-on nasinundul no og-ulì diò to Maambago, kagi sikandin to, “Ogka-agapan ka Usì.” Ogtabak ka taga Maguimon to, “Balagad. Hun-a ka rò du-on.” If there is someone from Maguimon who is leaving from Patil but he has left to return home, and there are others who have followed later who are returning to Maambago, they will say, “Usì, you will be inadvertently passed up.” The person from Maguimon will answer, “Nevermind. You just go on ahead.” Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Kagi to sagboka, “Ko ogka-agapan ka, koykow ka ogsakaru. Two were racing to return to the house. One said, “If you happen to be beaten [to the destination], you will be the one to fetch water.”

agpot 1n To be an outsider , that is, someone who is living in a location other than his own. Ko oghalin ki diò songo ugpa-an, mgo agpot ki rò. Agad duma ta no Manobò, mgo agpot ki rod su konò no ugpa-an ta. If we move to another place, we are just outsiders. Even if they are our fellow Manobos, we are still outsiders because it is not our place. ant: sakup 2. 2n Foreigner, that is, someone who resides in a country where he/she is not a citizen. Ogkohingaran to agpot kow kai to Pilipinas su sakup ka to songo ugpa-an. You are called foreigners here in the Philippines because you are subjects of another country. 3n A person who lives on someone else's property; displaced person. Ko warò tanò dan, mgo agpot sikandan. If they don't have land they are residing on someone else's land. [The Ata Manobo term agpot applies to a renter or someone who has permission to live on someone else's land. It does not have the negative connotation of the English term “squatter”. However, the people who dwell on a dump would be considered agpot because it is not considered that it is an appropriate place to live.] 4v To go somewhere for a short stay. Si Lita, nignangon ki Mery to diò oghibat to kandin. Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Lita told Mery to sleep (lit. lay down) at their place. Mery stayed a short time with them because she joined [them] for only one night. [In the following example, DB says the verbal form applies but Mary is not an agpot because she only stayed one night.] see: panumbaloy. 5n To be temporary residents of some place Mgo agpot ki rò kai to tanò. We are just resident aliens here on earth. Ko malayat ka pog-ugpò nu, sikan ka agpot su nig-amut ka. If your stay is long, that is the meaning of an resident alien because you have joined in [with those people]. [DB says the word can mean amut if it is in a temporary sense. See example. [original gloss: Mingle with.]] osyn: amut 1. 6v To stay somewhere for a short time Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Mary stayed for a short time because she joined [them] for only one night. [In this case, a person does not become an agpot “alien” or “foreigner” because the intent is just a short visit.]

agud cf: hayod; cf: anak 2. 1n The manipulation of a baby\\\\\\\'s position before and during the birthing process. Ko ogkaboros, ogkatapid ka batò ko no-omonu. No ko og-anak on, [ka agud], ian ka igbulig, no igparumaruma ka bolad to talag-uyamu. When someone is pregnant, the baby is positioned when it is not in the right position (lit. if what has happened). And when a person gives birth, [the agud] is the means of helping, by having the hands of the mid-wife accompany [the baby during the birthing process. [This term is used of the process of adjusting the position of the unborn baby during the final months of pregnancy. It is also used of the assistance given during labor when a midwife guides the baby toward the birth canal using gentle pressure with her hands. During that time she may also use her hands to properly position the baby. An Ata Manobo midwife is generally an older female relative who gains her skill and reputation through her own experience and that of others. Some, without formal training become very skilled, even in handling breach births. ] 2v To manipulate the position of an unborn baby during pregnancy or during the birthing process. Si Taganay ka og-agud. Taganay is the one to manipulate [the baby's position]. 2.1v To be manipulated, as the mother’s abdomen when a baby is being moved to the proper position for birthing. Ka gotok ka og-aguron. The [the mother's] abdomen is that which is manipulated. 2.2v To have someone manipulate the unborn baby’s position. Ko oggoramon to inoy to ogmasakit, ogpa-agud. When the mother feels pain, she will have someone manipulate the baby's position.