Search results for "panumbaloy"

agpot 1n To be an outsider , that is, someone who is living in a location other than his own. Ko oghalin ki diò songo ugpa-an, mgo agpot ki rò. Agad duma ta no Manobò, mgo agpot ki rod su konò no ugpa-an ta. If we move to another place, we are just outsiders. Even if they are our fellow Manobos, we are still outsiders because it is not our place. ant: sakup 2. 2n Foreigner, that is, someone who resides in a country where he/she is not a citizen. Ogkohingaran to agpot kow kai to Pilipinas su sakup ka to songo ugpa-an. You are called foreigners here in the Philippines because you are subjects of another country. 3n A person who lives on someone else's property; displaced person. Ko warò tanò dan, mgo agpot sikandan. If they don't have land they are residing on someone else's land. [The Ata Manobo term agpot applies to a renter or someone who has permission to live on someone else's land. It does not have the negative connotation of the English term “squatter”. However, the people who dwell on a dump would be considered agpot because it is not considered that it is an appropriate place to live.] 4v To go somewhere for a short stay. Si Lita, nignangon ki Mery to diò oghibat to kandin. Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Lita told Mery to sleep (lit. lay down) at their place. Mery stayed a short time with them because she joined [them] for only one night. [In the following example, DB says the verbal form applies but Mary is not an agpot because she only stayed one night.] see: panumbaloy. 5n To be temporary residents of some place Mgo agpot ki rò kai to tanò. We are just resident aliens here on earth. Ko malayat ka pog-ugpò nu, sikan ka agpot su nig-amut ka. If your stay is long, that is the meaning of an resident alien because you have joined in [with those people]. [DB says the word can mean amut if it is in a temporary sense. See example. [original gloss: Mingle with.]] osyn: amut 1. 6v To stay somewhere for a short time Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Mary stayed for a short time because she joined [them] for only one night. [In this case, a person does not become an agpot “alien” or “foreigner” because the intent is just a short visit.]

magaliug 1n Visitor; guest. see fr.: panumbaloy. 2v To visit someone with a specific purpose in mind. [DB distinguishes between panumbaloy and ogmagaliug or nigmagaliug. The first is a more casual visit as to a friend one misses, whereas the latter is a visit with a specific purpose in mind.] see: panumbaloy.

alap v 1To bring something to a destination. Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut. Just bring the fragrant soap. see fr.: ganuy 1; see fr.: baniwal 4. 1.1To take something somewhere. Ko du-on "jeep" no nasirà no awos no og-alapon diò to "shop" oyow ogdoyroyawon, songo igpaganuy rod to dangob no jeep. If there is a jeep which is broken down which need sto be taken to the shop to be repaired, it is also pulled by another jeep. spec: sakopu, utuk 1, baba, pangkul, ti-ang 1, bitbit 1, soy-ung, layap; see: hatod 2. 2To move or propel as fins move a fish through water. Ka alongaping, ian ka ogbo-ot to og-alap to lawa to sikan no ngalap. The fin by the fish's ear, that is what determines the movement (lit. carrying) of the body of that fish. 3To be carried away, as by water. Ko ogsamba, du-on baloy no ogka-alap. When [the river] floods, there are house(s) which are carried away. spec: alus 1; see fr.: anlas 3. 4To have someone to take something somewhere; send. 5(Fig) To be under someone's authority. Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 5.1(Fig) To carry a responsibility or hold authority. Si Joaquin pad ka naka-alap to katondanan to kapitanto Baranggay Gupitan. Joaquin is still the one who has held the position (lit. authority) of captain of Baranggay Gupitan. 5.1.1To be under someone's authority Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 6For something to be brought to someone. 6.1To be transmitted to, as an illness. Ko og-uma ka dalu no tiklas diò to songo ugpa-an, ko du-on ogpanumbaloy no ogligkat to sikan no ugpa-an, ogka-alapan ki to dalu. If an illness comes to some place, [and] if someone visits from that place, the illness will be transmitted (lit. inadvertantly carried) to us. see: halin 2.1. 6.2To be used in a certain way, as a word. Ian dò ogka-alapan no kinagian ko du-on duma ta no oghinggat to ogparigus no ogkagian ku to, “Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut.” The only way the word is used (lit. the only [meaning] carried by the word) is if we have a companion whom [we] invite to go bathing with us and I say, "Just bring the fragrant soap".

tiklas n Measles. Ko og-uma ka dalu no tiklas diò to songo ugpa-an, ko du-on ogpanumbaloy no ogligkat to sikan no ugpa-an, ogka-alapan ki to dalu. If the disease of measles comes to some place, [and] if someone comes for a visit from that place, the disease will be transmitted to us. [There are some other illness such as roseola (sp??) which involve a rash and are sometimes also called tiklas. However, the term is usually used specifically of measles. (A rash, by contrast, is described as Du-on ogpanlopow no ogdogos. Something that breaks out which itches. Chicken pox is ukù)]

tomu 1v To connect, come together, as fields Ko nigkamot ka diò limang to bubungan no nakagomow kad diò to songo du-on kamot, nokoglawang ka olin kamot. Nokogtomu on. If you cut a field on the other side of a mountain and go up over the top [where] there is another field, the fields joined each other. They have come together. see fr.: lawang 3. 2v To come together; to meet at a certain place from different directions Ko du-on “meeting”, ogpokogtomutomu ka mgo otow no pakitkito-oy. When there is a meeting, [many] people come together and see each other. 3v To meet. Ko du-on otow no ogpanumbaloy no ligkat to Kapalong, ogpatomu kanta diò to babalakan oyow ogpoko-untul to baloy ta oyow konò ogkalagaklagak. If there is someone who will come from Kapalong for a visit, [he] will have us meet him at the junction [of ??] so that he can find our house so that he won't get lost. osyn: tagbu; see: tagbu. 4v To join something together, such as fields Warò dan pogtomua to pogkamot. They didn't join [the fields] by cutting. 5v Come together (to fight) [come at each other ???] Si Dabid woy si Goliat, nigpatomtomuoy ko nigpo-og-ogotoy David and Goliath, they came at each other when they fought each other. see: po-og-ogotoy. 6Wà dod nigtotomu ka bokog. The bones [on baby’s head] haven’t grown together yet. 7v herald?? Talagtomu ka limukon. The dove is a herald [that someone is coming]. [The dove is the herald/one who brings people together?? (A dove call in front of one indicates he will meet someone coming from the opposite direction.)] 8v To come alongside. Ko mabogat ka og-alapon to duma ta, ogtomuon ta to ogbulig. If our companion is carrying something heavy, we will come alongside to help. [In the following example, the ones wanting to help are moving toward the one to be helped. The helpee is not moving toward the helpers.]