Search results for "purut"

kuò 1n Whatchamacallit. [Expression is used anytime one cannot think of what he/she wanted to say, or the name of a person. It is also often used by children to end an argument saying, “Kuò!” as if to imply there is something else to say but he just isn’t saying it.] see fr.: pakakuò; see fr.: abin 2. 2n Thing. Kuò ku sikan. Those things are mine. 3n Something. Kagi ni Ogmad kuò kanak... Ogmad said to me... 4v To get. Ka inagkud, ogkuò kid to agoloy, to homoy woy ko du-on pad duma no ogpogsolugsolugon to ogpokog-amut. To make] inagkud, we get corn, rice or some other [ingredient]s which are mixed together. 4.1v Take for oneself. 5v Receive. Warò nakuò now? You didn’t receive anything? see: purut 1. 6v 7adj Hospitable. Ogkagi ka magaliug to, "Makuò no otow su maga-an ki ogkasagman ka magaliug." He is a hospitable person because he is quick to wait on us guests. 7.1adj To treat well, be kind. Ko du-on ogkatagbu ta diò to dalan no ogsinogow ka batò, no ogbuligan ta to og-imu-imù, sikan ka makuò ki to batò. If we meet someone along the trail and [their] child is crying and we help comfort [him] that [is an example] of our having kind a child well.DB 26/Jun/2009 8To disturb Pitow ka -- ogkaku-an ka magaliug Look out -- he guests will be disturbed. 8.1v Excuse me. Ogkaku-an ka su ogbaya-a." Excuse me (lit. you may be disturbed) because I am passing by. [The literal translation of the expression is in both examples below is basically the same. However, the first is a warning that someone will be disturbed by the children’s noise, whereas the the intent of second statement is roughly equivalent of “excuse me” as one is alerting a guest that by passing they may be disturbed.] 8.2v To have disturbed [others] "Maniò to maku-an ka to magaliug?" Said as a rebuke to noisy children: “Why have you disturbed the guests?" 9v To inadvertantly offend someone. Du-on otow no makakuò to duma rin, no ogpakakagi to igmasakit to goinawa rin. There was someone who inadvertently hurt the feelings of his companion and said something that made him feel bad 10v To be offended or have ones feelisng hurt as bysomething said by someone else. Usì, konò ka ogkakuo-kuò su warò ku tu-uri ka nigkagi a to igmasakit to goinawa nu. Friend, don’t be offended ou because I didn't intend to hurt your feelings.

abalang 1v Seek out. Ko oglapas ki, og-aliguan ta ka maralom no og-abalang ki to mababow oyow konò ki ogka-alus diò to linow. When we cross [a river], we detour around the deep [part] and seek out the shallow [area] so that we won't be swept away by the current into the deep pool. [In the following example, a person is looking for a shallow place to cross a river in order not to be swept away by the current.] 2v To relentlessly pursue; to be after something, as a purpose. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will keep on discussing it with the father until he says yes. Kagi to balu, “Og-abalangon ku ka baloy no nighimu ni Jeremy di warò pad igkabayad ku.” The widow said, “I’m after the house that Jeremy made but I don't yet have anything to use for payment.” Ko ogkalituk on ka og-abalangon din, ogbuyu-on din on. When it is clear what she is after, [then] she will ask for it. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. Og-iling ka otow, “Nokoy ka og-abalangon to asu?” The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. Someone says, “What is that dog after? [If a person requests something which isn't given the first time he will keep coming back until the person finally gives what is requested. This can apply to a young man who keeps returning to talk to the father of a girl he wants to marry or can apply to a dog who keeps digging because he smells a rat and is determined to get it.] 3v That which someone is relentlessly pursuing. Og-atangan ku ka ig-abalangi din. I am blocking that which he is relentlessly pursuing. [The following example concerned an effort to dissuade a patient from returning home before he was well enough to do so.] see: buyù 1; see fr.: tu-ud 1. 4deriv n A person who is very persistent. Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. Ogko-iling to ogkapogos ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. It's as though the person from whom he is making a request is forced [to give it]. [If one day he asks for something and you don't give it, he will keep coming back in following days to request until you give it to him.]

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

alang-alang 1adv Incomplete, as grains on a stalk. Alang-alang pad ka pogkohinug din. The ripening process is still incomplete. [DB says the grains are about halfway down the stalk.] 1.1adj To be lacking. Alang-alang to tatou. It lacks three. 2v To cause someone to be short changed. Pa-alang-alang ogpurut to ayam ku no warò din ilibong kanak. He caused [me] to be short changed [by] taking my domesticated animals and then not returning them to me (lit. then he did not return them to me). [Culturally, it is permissible to borrow a younger relative’s animal to use as a brideprice for one’s daughter or female relative. However, it is expected that when the younger relative will be married, the older one who used his animal will be responsible for providing an animal as a replacement for the former owner’s brideprice. Not to do so results in the relative being short changed, or cheated as in the following example.] 2.1v To be shortchanged or cheated. Ian kid ogpa-alang-alangan ka nig-orok. We who were the ones who sowed are the ones who were cheated [because we didn't get to harvest]. [The custom is that those who sow are not paid but will be chosen later to help harvest because they will receive a portion of the harvest which is also their payment for sowing. If non-sowers are selected to harvest, the group who sowed are cheated of their anticipated payment.]

balò 1n A prediction based on some procedure or ceremony. Ka poghusud to natampod no songo banoy no bulu ko naponù to tanò, maroyow ka balò din su ogtuga ka homoy. When the single length of bamboo is pulled up, if it is full of earth, its sign is good because the rice will be plentiful. [Some predictions as from a test of the soil are not considered to be associated with sympathetic magic. However, predictions made in conjunction with ceremonies or sacrifices or the call of the omen bird are associated with traditional beliefs and involvement with the spirit world.] 2n With negative: Bad sign, as of bad luck Ogkagi to buyag, “Purut ka to manuk no igkuyab nu ig-awò to maro-ot no balò nu.” The older person will say, “Get a chicken to waver to remove your bad luck.” [especially that based on sympathetic magic] see: pamalii. 3v To use divination to determine the outcome or value of something. Ka mgo buyag, ogpanlo-uy to matosan no latì, no ogbabalo-an pad ko maroyow ka tanò no ogkamotan. The older people go out to a field of matured secondary growth and have a ceremony to determine whether it would be good to cut the growth on that piece of ground [for a field]. [It is based on sympathetic magic which may take various forms which are used by the Ata Manobo people to determine whether or not to cut a certain field. One method is to cut a piece of rattan the length of their cutting knife and then cut it again into lengths of the width of that same knife. From the pieces, they make a diagram on the ground of a rice house. If the pieces build a complete diagram with a ladder and an extra piece to fit in one of the rooms, the sign is good and they will cut that plot. However, if it comes out short, tor they have a tiny piece left over, they will not cut that field because they determine that the land will not produce a good crop. If there is a futhur extra long piece, it is put on the opposite end of the diagram which resembles a casket. Then they will not cut the field because they believe someone will die.] 4v To use something as a means to predict an outcome (??) 5v To have a resemblance to something Nabala-an to pogul su pogulon. He has a resemblance pogul wood because he’s lazy. [The following statement also seems to imply that that the lazy person was “destined” to be lazy. It is an insult by a parent who is angry because of the conduct.] 6v To treat by using sympathetic magic to bring about a desired result such as to rub bodies of an agressive wasp on a horse’s lips to make the horse agressive for a horse fight. Ka kuddò no nabalangitan, ogkabala-an to mgo ulod-ulod no songo ogmabulut. The horse which is being treated, [with something to make him fierce], he becomes like the creatures which are likewise fierce. 7deriv n Kind of bushy weed with long leaves which are tipped with red which could be used as a decorative plant.

dalangin 1vt To run an errand find out something, such as whether one can buy newly butchered meat. Ko du-on og-iow to babuy, kalabow, kuddò ogsugù koy to, "Dalangin kow su du-on nangiow to babuy. Purut kow to agad songo kilo." If someone is butchering a pig, water buffalo, [or] horse, we will command someone, “Go check it out because someone has butchered a pig. Get even one kilo.” see: lo-uy 2; see: ma-an 2. 2vi To be en route to go to a destination as an evil spirit which is en route to check out a dead person. Konò kow amana ogli-ag diò to tanò su ogkabaya-an kow to busow no ogdalangin to namatoy. Don't play so much outside (lit. on the ground) because you will happen to be in the path of evil spirit(s) which are en route to check out a dead person. 3v [For many people] to check something out Ko du-on og-iow, moon-ing ka oghondu-on ka ogdalanginan. If there is [an animal] being butchered, many go to check it out. 4v To delegate someone to do something. Kunto-on, to warò liwak nu to oghondiò to Malaybalay, nigdalanginan ta si Jaimi su du-on tu-ud din diò to Malaybalay no ian ta pinaboli to mgo gulayon. Today, since you didn’t have time to go to Malaybalay, we delegated Jaimi to do it [for us] because he had a purpose in Malaybalay and so we had him buy the food items. see: pagindalan; see: saligan. 5v To be pursued, as by evil spirits who want the game that a person is carrying. Ogdanginan ka otow to busow no ogbababa to babuy su ogngarog to langosa. A person who is carrying a pig on his back will be pursued by an evil spirit because it smells the blood. [Said to happen if one is carrying a pig after dark or when the light outside is dim because the spirit(s) are after the blood of the animal because it wants to take the animal away from the person. It is believed that the enounter may result in that person becoming ill.]

ibog 1n A strong desire or craving for something. Ka miow, ko ogdatong ka ibog dan to lukos no ungud ogmasamuk ka ogmiawmiaw su sikan ka batasan to miow ko ogko-ibog to ogpa-anak. DB Dic Nt May/2006 As for a cat, when it's craving for a male [cat] arrives, it noisily miows because that is the conduct of a cat when it craves to have offspring. 2vs To be thirsty. Ogbuyù a to woig su ogko-ibog a. I’m asking for water because I am thirsty. see fr.: laklakalan. 3vs To stongly desire something such as to be hungry for some specific food or for merchandise in a store. Purut ka. Alam ka to ogko-ibogan nu. Take something. Choose that which you are hungry for (lit. which is craved by you). Ko nokoy ka ogko-ibogan din, ogbolion. Whatever he/she strongly desires, [he/she] buys it. 3.1vs (With negative)To not have an appetite or desire for food. Du-on allow no konò ki ogko-ibog. Og-alam ki to ogko-ibogan ta. There are days when we don’t have an appetite. We choose what we desire [to eat]. 3.2v To strongly crave for something such as a pregnant woman who craves for a particular food. Du-on ka iam no alunggun, ko ogpangiram ka boi, ogko-ibog-ibog to bogas to mangga no ogpogos to iglukos din to ogpakuò to mangga. Mangkuan ko du-on on, konad ogko-ibogan. There was a newly [married] couple, [and] when the woman was in the beginning of pregancy, she strongly craved the mango fruit and so she forced her spouce to get a mango [for her]. Later, when it was already there she was no longer hungry for it.

indan phr.: Indanan nu man... 1v To remember Og-indanan to mgo batò ko hondo-i ogtugpa ka batu no intugdò dan. The children remember where the stone went down that they threw. see fr.: maningkalagan 2; osyn: pulù 5; see fr.: maningkalagan 1; see fr.: abin 1.1; see fr.: igmaganangon. 2v To reserve. Ko du-on og-indanan ku no kuddò, ogbogoy a to babuy no igpohun-a ku. Sikan ka igmaganangon ku to og-indanan kud on. If there is a horse which I will reserve, I will give a pig as a downpayment (lit. that which I [give] ahead of time). That is my guarantee that I have reserved it. see fr.: hikot 3; see fr.: bakos. 3v establish Ka inggasap no bulu no malintok, sikan ka igsokod to baloybaloy oyow ogko-indanan ko hondo-i ka mgo sinabong woy ka balokun woy ka pusina. The small [pieces of] bamboo which were cut, those were used to measure the diagram of the house to establish where the rooms, the porch and the kitchen will be. 4v set, as a date Ko ogkabatukan ta ka pitsa no du-on liwak, og-indanan ta ka sikan no allow no oglibulung. When we have discovered the date which is open (lit. has room), we set that day for gathering together. [Although the example of reserving a horse and setting a date seem similar, DB sees them as different because one chooses a date because of something important. Also, to reserve a horse is like “putting dibs on” that horse - there is a payment and if the terms of agreement are not met, you won't get the horse. There is no payment involved in setting a date (or “reserving” a day)] 5v That which is used to guarantee. Woy nu ogkapurut ko du-on on ka ig-indan no oghimu to sabut ko kon-u ogkagampusi -- ka ogkatibò on ka igbayad. You won't be able to take it until there is something to use as a guarantee which makes the agreement about when you will pay the remainder -- when [you] pay in full. see: maganangon 1. 6v To promise 7v signify Du-on uran no ogngaranan noy no saginwalu. Sikan ka indanan noy no wawalu no allow ka ungod og-uran. There is [a kind of rain] which we call saginwalu. That signifies to us that it will constantly rain for eight days. 8v To reserve or engage. 9n A sign, something used to signify something Ko du-on sagboka no batò no ungod ogsinogow, sikan ka pog-indan to du-on ogpoko-uma no mangayow. If there is a child who is always crying, that is a sign that raiders will arrive.
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