Search results for "sikan"

abin v 1To claim something for oneself. Woy rin ogka-abin ko ogkapurut din on. He cannot claim it until he has taken it. Ian og-abin to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The one who will claim the head is the one who carried the pig. Ian dò ogpa-abinon to ulu ka nigbaba to babuy. The only one who will be designated to claim the head will be the one who carried the pig on his back. [One of the components of abin that contrasts it to alam is that something may be given or the item may have been earned in some way.] see fr.: akon 1. 1.1To have someone take something for him/herself. Niggupal on woy nigtaladtalad dan on woy impa-abin dan ka ulu to nigbaba to sikan no babuy. They cut the meat up and divided it between themselves, and then they had the person who carried the pig on his back take the head for himself. osyn: akon 2; see: indan 1. 2To claim ownership of something. Nig-abin din on no kandin no gabas. He claimed that it was his own saw. see: kuò 1. 3To acknowlege as a relationship, or someone's authority. Nig-abin ni Pablo ka pogko-uripon din diò ki Hisus su noimu sikandin no sugu-anon. Paul acknowledged his [role as] slave to Jesus because he had become his servant. see fr.: unung 1; see fr.: damoy 2; see: tokod, patokod, ogho-o. 4To claim a relationship with someone not physically related; regard as related. Nig-abin a to sikan no otow; naan din no hari a rin. I have been claimed by that person; he regards me as his younger brother. Pan-abin din ka konò no hari rin. Layun ogsulodsulod kanta. He claims relationships with those who aren't his [real] younger-siblings. He is always paling-around-like-family with us. 5To admit or confess something, such as a fault. Kagi to sikan no nigtakow, “Og-abinon ku to koddì ian ka nigtakow koykow.” That person said, “I admit that it was really me who stole from you.” see fr.: angkon. 5.1Acknowlege or claim as one's own, such as one's subjects Og-abinon ni Joaquin ka taga Maambago no sakup din. Joaquin claims the residents of Maambago as his subjects. [DB says the relationship already exists. A leader is acknowledging his subjects as his. DB says that the sense is different than that of the earlier example in which Paul acknowledges that he is a slave/servant of God.] see: tokod 1. 6To attribute one's own thoughts or actions to someone else; shift blame to someone else. Ko du-on otow no ian nakasalò, no nigbayungan din ka songo otow su igpa-abin din ka nigtakow rin no salapì. If there is a person who actually was the one who did wrong, and then he accused someone else because he was causing his theft to be attributed [to someone else]. Ka sikan no nigpa-abin din diò to songo otow, impoid din ka salò din. That which he caused to be attributed to someone else, was used to cover up (lit. rub out) his fault. see fr.: bayung. 6.1To take the blame or assume the responsibility for someone else's action, such as someone else's debt, or of Jesus who took the punishment, blame or responsibility for the wrong doing of other people.

agap 1v To race, involving just two people. Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Two people will race [each other] to return home. Nig-a-agap ka darua. The two people were racing [each other]. 2v To race one another, esp. of three or more people. Ka sikan no ogpa-ag-agapoy, li-agan. Ogtagù to saku no ogpallaguy. Ka ogpakaponga, ian ogpakaro-og. That [word] race each other is a game. They get in sacks and run. The one who is able to finish [first] is the one who wins. Ogpa-ag-agapoy ka mgo kuddò. The horses are racing each other. [such as in a game with multiple participants or when racing horses.] 3v To chase and catch up with someone or something. Ko du-on darua no ogpalawod no ka sagboka oghun-a, og-agapan ka oghun-a. If two [people] are going downriver [by raft/canoe] and one gets ahead, the other will chase and catch up with the one which got ahead. [The term agapan “catch up” includes the components of the words gapun “chase” and ogko-umaan “overtake”.] osyn: liu 1. 4vs To be overtaken and passed so that the other person will reach a destination ahead of him/her; beaten to a destination. Ko du-on taga Maguimon no ogligkat to Patil di nig-ulì on sikandan, no du-on nasinundul no og-ulì diò to Maambago, kagi sikandin to, “Ogka-agapan ka Usì.” Ogtabak ka taga Maguimon to, “Balagad. Hun-a ka rò du-on.” If there is someone from Maguimon who is leaving from Patil but he has left to return home, and there are others who have followed later who are returning to Maambago, they will say, “Usì, you will be inadvertently passed up.” The person from Maguimon will answer, “Nevermind. You just go on ahead.” Darua ka og-agap no ulì diò to baloy. Kagi to sagboka, “Ko ogka-agapan ka, koykow ka ogsakaru. Two were racing to return to the house. One said, “If you happen to be beaten [to the destination], you will be the one to fetch water.”

agkud n 1A sweet, dessert-like cooked staple such as rice, corn or millet mixed with sugarcane sap and wrapped in a leaf and buried. Eaten after two days. Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. Oglong-ug di mo-omis. That which turns into the agkud staple is buried in the ground for two days. It sours/forments but it is sweet. [The product of the souring or fermentation of the mixture of ingredients is called agkud. It is described as sweet.] 2The early product or process of making agkud from a mixture or two or more staples such as corn and rice which is wrapped in leaves and buried for two days to form the dessert-like akud. Ka inagkud, ogpokogsolug ka agoloy to homoy no ogkoimu no agkud. [As for] inagkud, corn and rice are mixed together which will become agkud. [ Inagkud is the name of the mixture, or if affixed as a verb, of the process of mixing certain staples together to form a sweetened mixture of various staples. This mixture is then wrapped in leaves and buried in the ground for two days where it forments and swells to form the finished agkud which is sticky and something like biku. When it is dug up it is ready to eat.] 2.1A sweet preparation similar to inagkud but made with many ingredients.

agpot 1n To be an outsider , that is, someone who is living in a location other than his own. Ko oghalin ki diò songo ugpa-an, mgo agpot ki rò. Agad duma ta no Manobò, mgo agpot ki rod su konò no ugpa-an ta. If we move to another place, we are just outsiders. Even if they are our fellow Manobos, we are still outsiders because it is not our place. ant: sakup 2. 2n Foreigner, that is, someone who resides in a country where he/she is not a citizen. Ogkohingaran to agpot kow kai to Pilipinas su sakup ka to songo ugpa-an. You are called foreigners here in the Philippines because you are subjects of another country. 3n A person who lives on someone else's property; displaced person. Ko warò tanò dan, mgo agpot sikandan. If they don't have land they are residing on someone else's land. [The Ata Manobo term agpot applies to a renter or someone who has permission to live on someone else's land. It does not have the negative connotation of the English term “squatter”. However, the people who dwell on a dump would be considered agpot because it is not considered that it is an appropriate place to live.] 4v To go somewhere for a short stay. Si Lita, nignangon ki Mery to diò oghibat to kandin. Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Lita told Mery to sleep (lit. lay down) at their place. Mery stayed a short time with them because she joined [them] for only one night. [In the following example, DB says the verbal form applies but Mary is not an agpot because she only stayed one night.] see: panumbaloy. 5n To be temporary residents of some place Mgo agpot ki rò kai to tanò. We are just resident aliens here on earth. Ko malayat ka pog-ugpò nu, sikan ka agpot su nig-amut ka. If your stay is long, that is the meaning of an resident alien because you have joined in [with those people]. [DB says the word can mean amut if it is in a temporary sense. See example. [original gloss: Mingle with.]] osyn: amut 1. 6v To stay somewhere for a short time Nig-agpot si Mery su nig-amut on to songo kausiloman dò. Mary stayed for a short time because she joined [them] for only one night. [In this case, a person does not become an agpot “alien” or “foreigner” because the intent is just a short visit.]

agum 1n The pattern formed during the intial stage of weaving a basket. Ka pogbatokbatok, sikan ka agum. The forming of the pattern [of a basket], that is the agum. 1.1v The initial stage of beginning to weave a basket which includes the formation of the pattern of the basket. Ogbunsud to oghimu to liang. Agad nokoy kalasia no liang, sikan ka og-agumon. One begins to make a basket. Whatever kind of woven basket, that is the initial stage of weaving a basket. [One takes certain strands with each hand and begins to weave them together. This term apparently applies to any type of basket but it is at this stage that the pattern is set.] 2v To teach someone how to weave a basket. Og-a-agum si Buntit to liang no ogpabantayon din ka og-anaron din. Buntit is teaching someone how to weave a basket and she is watching the one she is teaching,

alang 1n A ritual performed to remove a charm, spell or hex. Ka so-ini no alang to taloy-u, igtubad to mgo busow. This ritual to remove a charm, it is [performed by] sacrificing to the spirits. ant: gamut 1; spec: kunakun. 1.1v That which is used as a means of treatment to remove a spell, charm or hex. Du-on ogtutungon dan no ig-alang ka ig-awò to sikan no taloy-u. There is something which they burn as a means of treatment to remove that love charm. [If a man has used a charm to cause a woman to fall in love with him, he will later use something to treat her to remove the love charm so that she will be freed from lust and able focus on her husband and family. However, with that release she may then react negatively and hate her husband for having used the charm to force her into this now unwanted relationship.] 1.2v For someone to be released from the effects of a charm by use of a ritual. Ko og-alangan din on to taloy-u ka asawa rin, ogmaro-ot on ka goinawa to boi to sikan no lukos su napogos ka goinawa rin to na-asawa sikandin. When his wife (lit. spouse) has been released from the charm by means of a ritual, the woman's attitude toward that man will become bad because her love (lit. breath) had been forced when she was married [to him]. 1.3v To have someone perform a ritual to remove the effects of a charm or a spell which has been cast by using witchcraft. Pa-alang ka su gamut so-ini no goramon nu. Have someone treat you because this ailment is [from] witchcraft. 2n A treatment such as that used to kill insects which damage a crop. Ka alang to mgo pinamula, warò nigligkat to igtubad. The treatment for a field does not come from a prayer/sacrifice [to the spirits]. [Although both uses of alang have to do with treatment, they are interpreted by some to be different in that the ritual to remove the effects of a charm involves invoking the supernatural, whereas treating a crop involves the burning of any of various kinds of wood or vines which produce toxic smoke which kills insects which are damag crops such as corn. The insects die and are eagerly eaten by the birds.] spec: kunakun, gisois, banga; see: bulung 1. 2.1v That which is used as a means of treating something, such as a crop 2.1.1n Something used for a treatment such as a kind of wood or vine. Ka ig-alang noy, mgo kayu, banga, anohow, pangamoton, mgo bunal no ian ka mgo a-alangoy to mgo pinamula. That which we use to treat [crops] are plants, banga palm, fan palm, plants of the field, vines which are the treatments of plants.

alap v 1To bring something to a destination. Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut. Just bring the fragrant soap. see fr.: ganuy 1; see fr.: baniwal 4. 1.1To take something somewhere. Ko du-on "jeep" no nasirà no awos no og-alapon diò to "shop" oyow ogdoyroyawon, songo igpaganuy rod to dangob no jeep. If there is a jeep which is broken down which need sto be taken to the shop to be repaired, it is also pulled by another jeep. spec: sakopu, utuk 1, baba, pangkul, ti-ang 1, bitbit 1, soy-ung, layap; see: hatod 2. 2To move or propel as fins move a fish through water. Ka alongaping, ian ka ogbo-ot to og-alap to lawa to sikan no ngalap. The fin by the fish's ear, that is what determines the movement (lit. carrying) of the body of that fish. 3To be carried away, as by water. Ko ogsamba, du-on baloy no ogka-alap. When [the river] floods, there are house(s) which are carried away. spec: alus 1; see fr.: anlas 3. 4To have someone to take something somewhere; send. 5(Fig) To be under someone's authority. Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 5.1(Fig) To carry a responsibility or hold authority. Si Joaquin pad ka naka-alap to katondanan to kapitanto Baranggay Gupitan. Joaquin is still the one who has held the position (lit. authority) of captain of Baranggay Gupitan. 5.1.1To be under someone's authority Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 6For something to be brought to someone. 6.1To be transmitted to, as an illness. Ko og-uma ka dalu no tiklas diò to songo ugpa-an, ko du-on ogpanumbaloy no ogligkat to sikan no ugpa-an, ogka-alapan ki to dalu. If an illness comes to some place, [and] if someone visits from that place, the illness will be transmitted (lit. inadvertantly carried) to us. see: halin 2.1. 6.2To be used in a certain way, as a word. Ian dò ogka-alapan no kinagian ko du-on duma ta no oghinggat to ogparigus no ogkagian ku to, “Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut.” The only way the word is used (lit. the only [meaning] carried by the word) is if we have a companion whom [we] invite to go bathing with us and I say, "Just bring the fragrant soap".

alig 1n Attraction, especially toward someone of the opposite sex. Ko ogko-iniat ki to boi to sikan ki pad nigkita, sikan ka alig pad to mata su ko konò tad ogkito-on ka sikan no boi, ogkalingawan ta sikandin. If we desire a girl when this is the first time we have seen her, that is the attraction of the eye(s) because if we don't see that girl [any more], we will just forget about her. Ka sikan no alig, konò no maro-ot su ko ogkita ki to boi no du-on goinawa ta kandin di mangkuan ogkasipod ki no ognangon to du-on goinawa ta kandin. Konò no ian ta ig-alig su oghimu ki to maro-ot. That [kind] of attraction isn't bad because when we see a girl and we like her (lit. have breath toward her), yet later on we will be shy to say that we like her. Our attraction isn't a means of attraction to for doing (lit.because we will do) something wrong. [The unreduplicated form of the word alig is described as not a bad emotion because a person is just interested in that person, but the initial interest may pass. That interest can grow into an appropriate relationship leading toward marriage. However, a person who is described as aligon is someone whose interest goes beyond the appropriate. Those people may desire someone who is married and may not be limited to one relationship.] 2v To be drawn to someone, as to God. Ko nig-alig ki to Magbobo-ot, indakoli ki to goinawa to Magbobo-ot. Kandin dò ka nig-alig. When we were drawn to God, our love (lit. breath) for God was increased. He alone was the one who drew us [to Himself]. 3v Affection for someone. Natapid ka pog-alig din no du-on on dakol no goinawa rin. Ka sikan no alig, sagboka rò no boi ka indakoli rin. Sikan ka ligkatan to og-asawo-on din. His affection for someone has become focused (lit. arranged). As for that affection, there is just one girl whom he loves. That is the source of his getting married [to her]. 4vs To be attracted by something such as a pretty design. Ogka-aligan ta ka maroyow no batok. We are attracted by the pretty design. 5v To make a commitment to one another as two who decide to get married. Nig-a-alig sikandan su nokog-un-unawa goinawa ran. Nokogsabut ka sikan. Nokog-iniatoy. Nokogso-ob ka alig dan no darua. They have made a commitment [to each other] because their feelings (lit. breath) werere the same. They have come to an agreement with each other. They desire each other. The attraction of the two [of them] is mutual. 6deriv n A lustful person. Ka otow no ogko-iniat to moon-ing no boi, sikan ka aligon. The person who desires many women, that is a lustful person. 7v To lust after others of opposite sex, not one's spouse. Ko du-on asawa woy ko dalaga, tibò din og-aligon. Whether it is a person who has a spouse or an unmarried lady, he lusts after all [of them].