Search results for "ungod"

ungod adv 1to do constantly, always or frequently (continually??) Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will constantly discuss it with the father until he says yes. [DB says the young man in the following example will keep going back to the father to discuss the issue again until the father gives in. In this context, the ungod “constantly” means the young man will keep going back to the father.] syn: layun. 2frequently, repeatedly Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. Ko nalugoy on no ungod kandin ogpanakow, natagaan on to mgo otow no malogot to kandin ka nigpurut. When it had been a long time and he was repeatedly stealing, it became known by the people that it was true that he was the one who had taken [things]. [In the following example, the reduplication of the word oglibonglibong means to “repeatedly come back”. However, in English, to “keep coming back” already means “repeatedly” so it would be redundant to say, “keep repeatedly coming back”.]

abalang 1v Seek out. Ko oglapas ki, og-aliguan ta ka maralom no og-abalang ki to mababow oyow konò ki ogka-alus diò to linow. When we cross [a river], we detour around the deep [part] and seek out the shallow [area] so that we won't be swept away by the current into the deep pool. [In the following example, a person is looking for a shallow place to cross a river in order not to be swept away by the current.] 2v To relentlessly pursue; to be after something, as a purpose. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will keep on discussing it with the father until he says yes. Kagi to balu, “Og-abalangon ku ka baloy no nighimu ni Jeremy di warò pad igkabayad ku.” The widow said, “I’m after the house that Jeremy made but I don't yet have anything to use for payment.” Ko ogkalituk on ka og-abalangon din, ogbuyu-on din on. When it is clear what she is after, [then] she will ask for it. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. Og-iling ka otow, “Nokoy ka og-abalangon to asu?” The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. Someone says, “What is that dog after? [If a person requests something which isn't given the first time he will keep coming back until the person finally gives what is requested. This can apply to a young man who keeps returning to talk to the father of a girl he wants to marry or can apply to a dog who keeps digging because he smells a rat and is determined to get it.] 3v That which someone is relentlessly pursuing. Og-atangan ku ka ig-abalangi din. I am blocking that which he is relentlessly pursuing. [The following example concerned an effort to dissuade a patient from returning home before he was well enough to do so.] see: buyù 1; see fr.: tu-ud 1. 4deriv n A person who is very persistent. Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. Ogko-iling to ogkapogos ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. It's as though the person from whom he is making a request is forced [to give it]. [If one day he asks for something and you don't give it, he will keep coming back in following days to request until you give it to him.]

agpu-unan 1n To be afflicted by an illness believed to be a result of meeting a long-haired spirit while bathing in a river or stream. Ko du-on batò no ogdaralu no ungod ogparigus, ogkagi ka mgo buyag to na-agpu-unan su nalimuan to gamowgamow. If a child gets sick who is always bathing [in the river], the older people say that he afflicted by an evil spirit because he affected by a long-haired spirit [which lives in the water]. [Wherever the swelling is on a body of the child, the people believe that is where the hair of the spirit wrapped around the child’s body.] see fr.: gamowgamow; see: limuan; see fr.: limuan; see: gamowgamow. 2v To become ill from contact with a female spirit with long hair which lives near a stream or river. Ko duon ogdaralu no mgo batò no malasi ogpamarigus diò to woig, kagi to amoy, “Pitow ka. Na-agpu-unan ka.” If there are children who become ill who are often bathing in the river (lit. water), the father says, “See. You have become ill from a spirit source.” Ko du-on batò no ogdaralu no ungod ogparigus, ogkagi ka mgo buyag to na-agpu-unan su nalimuan to gamowgamow. If a child gets sick who is always bathing [in the river], the older people say that he afflicted by an evil spirit because he was affected by a long-haired spirit [which lives in the water]. [They believe that there is a female spirit with long hair called a gamowgamow who lives in the water. They believe that if an adult or child gets tangled in her hair while bathing, it will cause them to be ill. They also believe that unless a special spirit ceremony is performed to remove this illness, the person may die. They believe a withered calf is one form of this illness but any illness following bathing is suspect.] see: limuan; see: gamowgamow.

alukuy 1n A friend. 2v To discuss something with someone else. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone desires to get married, he will pursue it. He will continuously discuss it with the father [of the girl] until he agrees (lit says “yes”). [This word seems to apply to discussion of specific issues and not to casual conversation. Ogpanangnangonoy seems to apply more correctly to casual conversation and exchange of general information.] 2.1v The thing which is being discussed. Ian dò ogka-alukuy ko songo monu ka igbotad no gastu to sikan no boi. The only thing they will be discussing is how much they will pay immediately upon request as a brideprice for that girl. 2.2v That which is discussed; topic of discussion. Ko du-on otow no og-utang di ogkasipod no ognangon, di songo otow on ka ognangonan din. Ogkagi to sikan no otow to, “Du-on ig-alukuy din koykow.” If there is a person who [wants to] borrow get something on credit but is ashamed to speak up, then he will tell another person. That person will say, “He has something to discuss with you.” 2.3v To have a group discussion. Ogma-al-alukuyoy ka mgo buyag tongod ko du-on mgo lupuganon. The leaders are having a group discussion about whether there will be [eventual] reciprocal exhanges for a brideprice. 3deriv n Discussion. Ian on amoy-amoy ka ogtangkò to alukuyan. The person who speaks on behalf of the man is the spokesman for the discussion (lit. one who faces the discussion). [In a wedding arrangement, the spokesman for the man is called an amoy-amoy (a term used for an adoptive or foster father).] 4deriv n A friendship gift. Pal-alukuyan dan. [It is] their friendship gift.

amana adv 1Enough; too much, to have had it [with someone for some reason], my goodness; not fair “Amana so goinawa nu no ma-agkap.” “Can’t you get just a little angry?” Amana so-ini no batò no ungod ogsinogow no ma-agol so bo-bò. [I've] had it with this child who is always crying who has a hollowed-out mouth! Amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init. My goodness that you have been traveling in the sun when it is excessively hot. (meaning: [You] shouldn't be traveling in the sun.) [used to express frustration, irritation or surprise about something or someone. Some idiomatic English expressions connote similar iconcepts in the following examples:] 2With negative: [not] quite, [not] so much Ka abu-on, ogko-iling to kolor no abug. Konò amana no maputì; ogsolug. [The color of the abu-on bird resembles the color of ashes. It isn't quite white; it's [color] is mixed. 3An exclamation indicating surprise, sometimes with a hint of disapproval. The meaning is similar to the English expression, “goodness gracious”. Amana so goinawa nu no ma-agkap! How can you be so calm! Amana so-ini no batò no ungod ogsinogow no ma-agol so bo-bò. Goodness gracious this child who is always crying whose mouth is a cavern (lit. hollow)! Amana to nigsingallow kow to subla no mo-init Goodness gracious that you travelled in the sunshine when it is exceedingly hot! [The following was the surprised response of a neighbor who wondered how someone could stay peaceful/calm when being threatened. There is also a hint that the speaker wishes he would at least get a little upset.] 4Idiom similar to English, “Bless your heart”, or “You poor thing”. Amana-amana ka bag no sasampoton koddì. Bless your heart for feeling lonely for me.

anak phr.: anak to dalan; phr.: anak to pamubungon. 1n A male or female offspring of an animal or human; son or daughter. 2v To give birth. Ko ogkapanoy ogkatapid ka batò diò to diralom to gotok, oglomulan ka inoy ko og-anak. If the baby (lit. child) in the abdomen has been properly positioned ahead of time, the mother will have it easier when she gives birth. Gabi-i pad nig-anak on ka kuddò ku. Just yesterday my horse gave birth. cf: agud. 2.1v To give birth in some place. - Ogdurugmun ka babuy to og-anakan din. A pig makes a bed for [a place where] she will give birth. 2.2v To give birth to multiple offspring. Ka karpa no ngalap, woy ogpanganak ko ogsilò ka bulan. Carp fish don’t give birth to multiple offspring until the moon comes out. 2.2.1v To give birth multiple times; give birth frequently. Ko du-on og-anak no warò pad nigtu-ig ka anak din no ogpanganak man dò sikandin, oghingaranan no mahariharion no manggianak su malasi og-anak. If someone gives birth when her child is not yet a year old so she is giving birth again, she is called a mother who produces siblings [one after another] because she frequently gives birth. 2.2.2v To reach birthing time. Ko du-on og-insò ko kon-u nanganak ka amboy nu, kagi to songo otow, “Ka ligad dò no allow ka pogpanganak.” If someone asks when your daughter-in-law delivered [her baby], another person will answer, “The previous day was her birthing time”. 2.2.3v Those which are birthed. Ka po-it, ka alu-an, woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it, mudfish and the catfish, are birthed alive (lit. directly live, when it is the time for them to be born [lit. the ones being birthed]. 3deriv n Uterus Ka a-anakan, sikan ka ugpa-an to batò diò gotok to inoy. The uterus, that is the dwelling place of the child in the abdomen of the mother. 4deriv n An adopted child. Ogko-iling ki Ugalinga no nig-uyamu to mgo batò, ogkoimu no anak-anak ran. It’s like Ugalinga who is caring from the childen, they have become heir adopted children. see: uyamuan. 4.1deriv n A stepchild. [A stepchild, that is the child of one's spouse is an anak-anak but not considered to be an uyamuan which is used of an adopted or foster child] 5deriv n Nephew or neice, also a cousin’s child. Si Binitu, songo maka-amung ku rod su anakon ku si Angelina. As for Binitu, he has also become my son-in-law because Angelina is my neice. 6deriv n Anything that has a young offspring; a mother, but especially a nursing mother. Ka mgo ngalap to woig no poit maroyow ka sabow rin to duon iam no manggi-anak su oggatasan. As for the po-it fish [lit. creatures of the water which are po-it], its soup is good for the nursing mother because [her breasts] will produce milk . [Also applies to female animals with young.] 6.1vs To become a nursing mother. Ka ogkamanggi-anak on no boi, sikan ka iam nig-anak no du-on on ogtago-uro-on no batò. Sikan ka ungod din oggibo-on, ogpasusuon, ogsakopuon woy og-uahon. A woman who has become a nursing mother, that is the one who has has newly given birth and now has a a child to care for. [Also applies to female animals who newly give birth] 7deriv n Parent and child doing something together; from parent’s standpoint. 8deriv n A child accompanied by his/her parent or parent accompanying his/her child. Ka tag-anak, ka amoy nigduruma to anak din. A child accompanied by its father, [that is when] the father has accompanied his son/daughter (lit. offspring). Ka amoy no nighondiò to lunsud, tag-anak ka nigduruma to du-on ogbolion dan diò to lunsud. The father who went to town, they are the child with his parent who accompanied each other to buy [something] in town. 8.1n A mother and her child. 9deriv v To hunt for frogs by searching for the frog eggs. Ogpaki-anak ki. We search for the offspring [of frogs]. Ogpakianak ki, ko ogkita ki to atolug to bakbak, du-on ta rò ogpamitawon ka inoy su du-on dò ian to marani ka og-olon. When we hunt for frogs, when we see the eggs of the frog, we will just find the mother [frog] because she will be there closely watching over [her eggs]. 10n Descendent of recent past [That is, descendants who were known andcan be recounted by one’s relatives in contrast to kapunganan which would refer to decendants a long time removed.] see: kapunganan 1.