Search results for "woig"

agpu-unan 1n To be afflicted by an illness believed to be a result of meeting a long-haired spirit while bathing in a river or stream. Ko du-on batò no ogdaralu no ungod ogparigus, ogkagi ka mgo buyag to na-agpu-unan su nalimuan to gamowgamow. If a child gets sick who is always bathing [in the river], the older people say that he afflicted by an evil spirit because he affected by a long-haired spirit [which lives in the water]. [Wherever the swelling is on a body of the child, the people believe that is where the hair of the spirit wrapped around the child’s body.] see fr.: gamowgamow; see: limuan; see fr.: limuan; see: gamowgamow. 2v To become ill from contact with a female spirit with long hair which lives near a stream or river. Ko duon ogdaralu no mgo batò no malasi ogpamarigus diò to woig, kagi to amoy, “Pitow ka. Na-agpu-unan ka.” If there are children who become ill who are often bathing in the river (lit. water), the father says, “See. You have become ill from a spirit source.” Ko du-on batò no ogdaralu no ungod ogparigus, ogkagi ka mgo buyag to na-agpu-unan su nalimuan to gamowgamow. If a child gets sick who is always bathing [in the river], the older people say that he afflicted by an evil spirit because he was affected by a long-haired spirit [which lives in the water]. [They believe that there is a female spirit with long hair called a gamowgamow who lives in the water. They believe that if an adult or child gets tangled in her hair while bathing, it will cause them to be ill. They also believe that unless a special spirit ceremony is performed to remove this illness, the person may die. They believe a withered calf is one form of this illness but any illness following bathing is suspect.] see: limuan; see: gamowgamow.

anak phr.: anak to dalan; phr.: anak to pamubungon. 1n A male or female offspring of an animal or human; son or daughter. 2v To give birth. Ko ogkapanoy ogkatapid ka batò diò to diralom to gotok, oglomulan ka inoy ko og-anak. If the baby (lit. child) in the abdomen has been properly positioned ahead of time, the mother will have it easier when she gives birth. Gabi-i pad nig-anak on ka kuddò ku. Just yesterday my horse gave birth. cf: agud. 2.1v To give birth in some place. - Ogdurugmun ka babuy to og-anakan din. A pig makes a bed for [a place where] she will give birth. 2.2v To give birth to multiple offspring. Ka karpa no ngalap, woy ogpanganak ko ogsilò ka bulan. Carp fish don’t give birth to multiple offspring until the moon comes out. 2.2.1v To give birth multiple times; give birth frequently. Ko du-on og-anak no warò pad nigtu-ig ka anak din no ogpanganak man dò sikandin, oghingaranan no mahariharion no manggianak su malasi og-anak. If someone gives birth when her child is not yet a year old so she is giving birth again, she is called a mother who produces siblings [one after another] because she frequently gives birth. 2.2.2v To reach birthing time. Ko du-on og-insò ko kon-u nanganak ka amboy nu, kagi to songo otow, “Ka ligad dò no allow ka pogpanganak.” If someone asks when your daughter-in-law delivered [her baby], another person will answer, “The previous day was her birthing time”. 2.2.3v Those which are birthed. Ka po-it, ka alu-an, woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it, mudfish and the catfish, are birthed alive (lit. directly live, when it is the time for them to be born [lit. the ones being birthed]. 3deriv n Uterus Ka a-anakan, sikan ka ugpa-an to batò diò gotok to inoy. The uterus, that is the dwelling place of the child in the abdomen of the mother. 4deriv n An adopted child. Ogko-iling ki Ugalinga no nig-uyamu to mgo batò, ogkoimu no anak-anak ran. It’s like Ugalinga who is caring from the childen, they have become heir adopted children. see: uyamuan. 4.1deriv n A stepchild. [A stepchild, that is the child of one's spouse is an anak-anak but not considered to be an uyamuan which is used of an adopted or foster child] 5deriv n Nephew or neice, also a cousin’s child. Si Binitu, songo maka-amung ku rod su anakon ku si Angelina. As for Binitu, he has also become my son-in-law because Angelina is my neice. 6deriv n Anything that has a young offspring; a mother, but especially a nursing mother. Ka mgo ngalap to woig no poit maroyow ka sabow rin to duon iam no manggi-anak su oggatasan. As for the po-it fish [lit. creatures of the water which are po-it], its soup is good for the nursing mother because [her breasts] will produce milk . [Also applies to female animals with young.] 6.1vs To become a nursing mother. Ka ogkamanggi-anak on no boi, sikan ka iam nig-anak no du-on on ogtago-uro-on no batò. Sikan ka ungod din oggibo-on, ogpasusuon, ogsakopuon woy og-uahon. A woman who has become a nursing mother, that is the one who has has newly given birth and now has a a child to care for. [Also applies to female animals who newly give birth] 7deriv n Parent and child doing something together; from parent’s standpoint. 8deriv n A child accompanied by his/her parent or parent accompanying his/her child. Ka tag-anak, ka amoy nigduruma to anak din. A child accompanied by its father, [that is when] the father has accompanied his son/daughter (lit. offspring). Ka amoy no nighondiò to lunsud, tag-anak ka nigduruma to du-on ogbolion dan diò to lunsud. The father who went to town, they are the child with his parent who accompanied each other to buy [something] in town. 8.1n A mother and her child. 9deriv v To hunt for frogs by searching for the frog eggs. Ogpaki-anak ki. We search for the offspring [of frogs]. Ogpakianak ki, ko ogkita ki to atolug to bakbak, du-on ta rò ogpamitawon ka inoy su du-on dò ian to marani ka og-olon. When we hunt for frogs, when we see the eggs of the frog, we will just find the mother [frog] because she will be there closely watching over [her eggs]. 10n Descendent of recent past [That is, descendants who were known andcan be recounted by one’s relatives in contrast to kapunganan which would refer to decendants a long time removed.] see: kapunganan 1.

antog 1v To purposely disturb or jostle something or someone. Ogtu-uran ta to og-antog to duma ta su ogko-on kid on; ogpukawon ta. We purposely disturb our companion because we will eat now; we awaken him/her. [such as when wanting to awaken someone] see fr.: dugnal 1. 2vs To be jostled. Ko ligad ki no ogkakois ta ka lamisaan, ogka-antog su nawo-il. If we brush against the table as we pass, it is jostled because it moved. 2.1vs To be disturbed as by a touch, a noise or a movement. Ko ogkoirogò ki to mo-ugtu no du-on ogkakagi, ogka-antog ki no ogkapukawan ki. Ka doromdom ta ka na-antog. If we sleep at noon and there are those who are talking, we will be disturbed and we will be awakened. It is our thinking which was disturbed. Na-antog ka lapinid to nabus-ugan to woig no pigsogod si Elena. The wasps were disturbed by having water poured on them and then Elena was stung. 3v To jog someone's memory; remind. Ko du-on utang to duma ta no konò ogbayad, og-antogan ta to og-insò. If one of our companions has a debt which [he/she] doesn't pay, we jog his/her memory by asking. Magi-insò ka igbogoy ku no babuy kaniu, ig-antog ku to doromdom nu ko kalingawan nu ka kanak? The pig which I am giving to you is being used to open the door to inquiry to jog your memory (lit. thinking) if you have forgotten that which is mine [that is, an unpaid debt for help with a bride price]? [such as when a debt has not been paid.] 4adj To disturb someone emotionally. Na-antog ka goinawa rin to bayungbayung dò kandin. Natokow ki su warò ki no-inso-i. His emotions (lit breath) were disturbed by those were were just making [false] accusations. We were taken by surprise because we had not been asked [about it]. [that is, to have negative emotions triggered by some incident]

awang phr.: ogma-awang to goinawa. 1adj Light, as that of a lamp, or sun. Ka goinawa ran, ogpoko-uma sikandan to ma-awang pad. . It was their desire (lit. breath) to arrive while it was still light. Ko du-on manggad no manipis, mo-ilag ka pogpitow ta su oglagbas ka ma-awang. If there is thin materials, it is show-through because light goes through it. Ka allow, ogbogoy to layag to ma-awang. As for the sun, it produces (lit. gives) rays of light. see fr.: ilag 2; osyn: ting-ow 1, ilag 1; see fr.: ilag 3. 1.1phrase To be free of apprehension; peaceful. With negative, to be unpeaceful. Ka sikan no ma-agkap so goinawa ta, ogkalituk to, ma-awang ka goinawa ta. Ogpakasalig ki kandin. When we feel OK about something (lit. as for our breath which is light-weight), it means that we are free of apprehension (lit. our breath is clear). Ka sikan no ogka-aras, lagboy no konò ogma-awang ka goinawa rin. As for that being frustrated, she was definitely not at peace (lit. her breath was especially not clear/peaceful). 1.2v To be clear, sediment free. Ka woig no mating-ow, mo-ilag dod. Ka mating-ow woy ka ma-awang, warò ogpaka-atang. Water which is sediment free, is also transparent. That which is sediment free and that which is clear have nothing obstructing the light. 1.3adj (Fig) Clear, as of understanding, comprehension. Ogmataloytoy, matul-id woy ma-awang ka pogsabut ta. The meaning is uncluttered, straight and our understanding [of the words] is clear. 1.4adj Empty, as an open space. Du-on batò no magalat ka ngipon din. Ka ngipon din, du-on olatan no ma-awang. There is a child whose teeth are far apart. His teeth have an gap between them which is open. 1.4.1adj Open or unobstructed, as when a roof has been blown off. 1.5v [A command] to clear [something] of debris or make something which has been said more understandable. 2v To clear or become sediment free like water in a spring fed pool clears after rain has muddied the water. 3v To make free of clutter. 3.1v To say or do something to prevent, or clear away a harmful situation. [When a misfortune such as an injury or illness happens to someone, others will put index finger between lips, spit and say ‘pa-awang’, pointing to the ground, so that the same thing won’t happen to them.]

bala-as 1n A swamp, or swampy area of an uncut field. Ko du-on ka niglanowlanow no woig no konò ogko-oti-an, sikan ka bala-as su warò pad aligbat makamoti. Ko ogkakamot on, ogko-oti-an on no maroyow to homoy su ogmalambog. When there is a shallow mini-lake of water which doesn’t dry up, that is a swamp because it has never (lit. not yet ever ) been cut. When it will be cut, it will dry up and the rice will be good because it will be well developed. [The area is also called bala-as because it is mabbonos (either from being full of weeds or plants.) But the area will dry up if cut so ithen it is no longer called bala-as.] 1.1v To grow [something] in a swampy area. Ogtuga lagboy ka homoy ko ogbalbala-as. The rice will be abundant if it is grown in a swampy area. 2n A stage of growth of rice when it is beginning to bud. [For taller rice, that is when it is about 4 feet high but the height of the rice would depend on the kind sown.]

batuk 1v To find, discover. Inat konò ogpakabatuk. It's as if one cannot discover [the meaning]. Warò ki pad makabatuk to maroyow no dalan. We had not yet discovered the good path. Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. [The mixture] is buried in the ground for two days [before]] finding [it to have become] the agkud delicacy. see fr.: tugul 3; see fr.: kita 2; see fr.: tolom 3. 2v To be effective. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever medicine is effective against an illness, that is strong medicine. 3v To identify, such as to narrow down to the one person whom one would marry. Ko konò ogkahalin ka goinawa nu diò to duma no boi, no ian nu ogbatukon ka sikan no boi no nasabutan nu. If your love (lit. breath) does not change to another girl, then you have identified the girl with whom you had an agreement [to be the one whom you would marry]. [The sense here seems to be that one's search is narrowed down to this one person so that one knows she is the one he is looking for.] see: tu-on 1. 4v To locate, or go to a specific place for a specific purpose. Ka kunto-on no tipouri no mgo otow, du-on batasan to du-on on indosanan no kasilyas no du-on dò ogbatuk ka og-indos. As for the present-day people who have come later (lit. last), there is a custom to have an outhouse for defecating and so that is [the only] place people will go to to defecate. [The following seems to mean that in contrast to the past when people defecated anywhere, now people go to only that specific location which has been made for that purpose.] 5v To find or locate Ko oglapas ki, ko konò ki ogpakabatuk to mababow su mabolbol ka woig, ogka-alus ki diò to maralom. If we cross [a river], if we cannot locate a shallow area because the water is swift, we will be carried away by the current to a deep area. 6v To get at, or be effective against, as an illness. Ko nokoy no tambal no ogpakabatuk to masakit, ian ka ma-agbot no tambal. Whatever the medicine is which gets at the illness, that is efficatious (lit. strong) medicine. see: tu-on ??. 7v To be passed down, as some characteristic or authority which is recognized in someone's descendant Sikan ka oghingaranan noy no batuk to anak. Ka katondanan ni Dabid, nigbatuk ki Husi. No ka katondanan ni Husi, nigbatuk man dò diò ki Hisus. That is [what] we call passed down to an offspring. The authority of David, it is passed down to Joseph. And the authority of Joseph, it is then passed down to/found in in Jesus. 8v to find to be [or to have become] something Iglobong diò to tanò to daruwa no allow ka pogbatuk to sikan no agkud. That which found to be agkud is buried in the ground for two days. [In the following example, the it takes two days for the mixture of ingredients to change into the food item called akud.] 9Retrieve food once cached away. 10Return. 11v find out, reveal 12Kabatukon ku so-i komos. ???