Search results for "ibò"

ubus 1v To use up all of something; to be all gone. Kagi to otow to, “Konò kad ogparagas su warò homoy diò to Patil su no-ubusan.” The person said, “Don't continue because there is no rice in Patil because it has been consumed. Ka nasalapi to bulu rin, no-ubus to otow no nigsaligan din. The money earned from his bamboo was used up by the person whom he had entrusted [with the sale]. [In the following example, the rice was consumed because it had all been purchased.] see fr.: tibò 5. 2v With negative: Finish, as weeding or cutting a field. Ogkagi rin to ogkara-at ka homoy rin su konò ogko-ubus no oghilamonon. She would say that her rice will be wasted because she cannot finish weeding [her field]. Ko banta-an to tagtu-un to kamot no ogpabuligan din to moon-ing no mgo otow oyow mgo tatolu no allow ogko-ubusan on to ogga-ani. When the owner is about to begin [harvesting his] field, then he has many people helping him so that in about three days [they] can finish harvesting it. [For other tasks, as washing dishes, the term would be kapongaan “complete”.] see: ponga 1. 3v All without exception; completely. Ogpatokawan to og-alamaraan oyow ogko-ubus dan oghimatoy They cause [the house/village] to be taken by surprise when they have banded together in mass to attack so that they can kill all without exception. Ogsulungan dan ka songo baloy no og-ubuson on ogpanhimatoy. They will attack a house and then they will completely kill off [everyone]. Agad to nataga ka mgo otow to koddì ka tagtu-un to sikan no pinamula, pig-ubus dan abata ka impamula ku no bontung. Even though the people knew that I was the owner of those plants, they totally cut down [all] the bamboo which I had planted. Woy ogkohingarani to og-apu-ung ka Liboganon ko ogpangubus to napù to pogsamba. One wouldn't say the Liboganon River was at high tide unless all of the flat area has been completely [covered] by flooding. see: tibò 1. 4At least a hundred. 5v To be used up befoe one gets something. Ubusan ka. It will be used up before you get any. 6Take all.

ulobang n Any kind of shrimp or crayfish. Tobtobi nu ka ulobang. Bite off [the tails] of the shrimps. [Generic for any kind of shrimp, lobster or crayfish. Shrimp have vertical tails and get air from the water. Crayfish and lobsters breathe air like a crab and have tails that fan out. There are many specific names which include many kinds of shrimp, lobsters and crayfish.] spec: karugukduguk, lombu-u, mangalow, salanggungow, sangal, ayagad, agal, tu-ug to uak, bukotut, tibogow 2.

abalang 1v Seek out. Ko oglapas ki, og-aliguan ta ka maralom no og-abalang ki to mababow oyow konò ki ogka-alus diò to linow. When we cross [a river], we detour around the deep [part] and seek out the shallow [area] so that we won't be swept away by the current into the deep pool. [In the following example, a person is looking for a shallow place to cross a river in order not to be swept away by the current.] 2v To relentlessly pursue; to be after something, as a purpose. Ko du-on ogko-iniatan no ogpangasawa, og-abalangon. Og-alukuyon ungod ka amoy taman to ogho-o on. If someone wants to get married, he will pursue it relentlessly. He will keep on discussing it with the father until he says yes. Kagi to balu, “Og-abalangon ku ka baloy no nighimu ni Jeremy di warò pad igkabayad ku.” The widow said, “I’m after the house that Jeremy made but I don't yet have anything to use for payment.” Ko ogkalituk on ka og-abalangon din, ogbuyu-on din on. When it is clear what she is after, [then] she will ask for it. Ogkukutkut ka asu su og-abalangon din ka ambow diò to lungag to tanò. Og-iling ka otow, “Nokoy ka og-abalangon to asu?” The dog is digging because he is relentlessly pursuing a rat there in a hole in the ground. Someone says, “What is that dog after? [If a person requests something which isn't given the first time he will keep coming back until the person finally gives what is requested. This can apply to a young man who keeps returning to talk to the father of a girl he wants to marry or can apply to a dog who keeps digging because he smells a rat and is determined to get it.] 3v That which someone is relentlessly pursuing. Og-atangan ku ka ig-abalangi din. I am blocking that which he is relentlessly pursuing. [The following example concerned an effort to dissuade a patient from returning home before he was well enough to do so.] see: buyù 1; see fr.: tu-ud 1. 4deriv n A person who is very persistent. Ka sika abalangon, ungod oglibonglibong taman to ogkapurut din ka ogbuyu-on din. Ogko-iling to ogkapogos ka ogbuyu-on din. As for that person who is persistent, he keeps coming back until he is able to get that for which he was begging. It's as though the person from whom he is making a request is forced [to give it]. [If one day he asks for something and you don't give it, he will keep coming back in following days to request until you give it to him.]

alang-alang 1adv Incomplete, as grains on a stalk. Alang-alang pad ka pogkohinug din. The ripening process is still incomplete. [DB says the grains are about halfway down the stalk.] 1.1adj To be lacking. Alang-alang to tatou. It lacks three. 2v To cause someone to be short changed. Pa-alang-alang ogpurut to ayam ku no warò din ilibong kanak. He caused [me] to be short changed [by] taking my domesticated animals and then not returning them to me (lit. then he did not return them to me). [Culturally, it is permissible to borrow a younger relative’s animal to use as a brideprice for one’s daughter or female relative. However, it is expected that when the younger relative will be married, the older one who used his animal will be responsible for providing an animal as a replacement for the former owner’s brideprice. Not to do so results in the relative being short changed, or cheated as in the following example.] 2.1v To be shortchanged or cheated. Ian kid ogpa-alang-alangan ka nig-orok. We who were the ones who sowed are the ones who were cheated [because we didn't get to harvest]. [The custom is that those who sow are not paid but will be chosen later to help harvest because they will receive a portion of the harvest which is also their payment for sowing. If non-sowers are selected to harvest, the group who sowed are cheated of their anticipated payment.]

alap v 1To bring something to a destination. Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut. Just bring the fragrant soap. see fr.: ganuy 1; see fr.: baniwal 4. 1.1To take something somewhere. Ko du-on "jeep" no nasirà no awos no og-alapon diò to "shop" oyow ogdoyroyawon, songo igpaganuy rod to dangob no jeep. If there is a jeep which is broken down which need sto be taken to the shop to be repaired, it is also pulled by another jeep. spec: sakopu, utuk 1, baba, pangkul, ti-ang 1, bitbit 1, soy-ung, layap; see: hatod 2. 2To move or propel as fins move a fish through water. Ka alongaping, ian ka ogbo-ot to og-alap to lawa to sikan no ngalap. The fin by the fish's ear, that is what determines the movement (lit. carrying) of the body of that fish. 3To be carried away, as by water. Ko ogsamba, du-on baloy no ogka-alap. When [the river] floods, there are house(s) which are carried away. spec: alus 1; see fr.: anlas 3. 4To have someone to take something somewhere; send. 5(Fig) To be under someone's authority. Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 5.1(Fig) To carry a responsibility or hold authority. Si Joaquin pad ka naka-alap to katondanan to kapitanto Baranggay Gupitan. Joaquin is still the one who has held the position (lit. authority) of captain of Baranggay Gupitan. 5.1.1To be under someone's authority Ko du-on diò to songo barrio on ka ogka-alap, inat to mgo sakup din tibò. If there are those in a some village who are under [someone's] authority (lit. carried by someone), it seems that they are all his subjects. 6For something to be brought to someone. 6.1To be transmitted to, as an illness. Ko og-uma ka dalu no tiklas diò to songo ugpa-an, ko du-on ogpanumbaloy no ogligkat to sikan no ugpa-an, ogka-alapan ki to dalu. If an illness comes to some place, [and] if someone visits from that place, the illness will be transmitted (lit. inadvertantly carried) to us. see: halin 2.1. 6.2To be used in a certain way, as a word. Ian dò ogka-alapan no kinagian ko du-on duma ta no oghinggat to ogparigus no ogkagian ku to, “Alap ka rò to sabun no mohomut.” The only way the word is used (lit. the only [meaning] carried by the word) is if we have a companion whom [we] invite to go bathing with us and I say, "Just bring the fragrant soap".

alibutod n White grubs. Oggusi-on tad ka galung ta no pula no ogkito-on tad ka moon-ing no alibutod no og-aliboodbood on. We split oven the pula palm tree which we have notched and then we see many white grubs which are wiggling about. [These are hatched from the eggs of the kamolung beetles which may be black, brown, reddish, or green. The grubs are cultivated by felling a palm tree with an edible heart such as the pula palm. The palm tree is felled and the palm heart ubud is removed from the upper portion of the tree near the leaves to be used for food. Then the tree is grooved at intervals of about one arm span. It is then covered with leaves and left for about three months. Beetles lay their eggs in the grooves and the larva feed on the pulp lisuan of the tree. When someone comes back to check the tree, he taps it to see if the grubs have developed and filled the pulp of the tree. If they have, the creatures will make a whispery na-asna-as sound. The tree trunk will be split open and the grubs collected which are cooked and eaten. They are described as consisting almost entirely of fat. However, not everyone eats them.] spec: kanggò; spec: katod; spec: langi-on.

alig 1n Attraction, especially toward someone of the opposite sex. Ko ogko-iniat ki to boi to sikan ki pad nigkita, sikan ka alig pad to mata su ko konò tad ogkito-on ka sikan no boi, ogkalingawan ta sikandin. If we desire a girl when this is the first time we have seen her, that is the attraction of the eye(s) because if we don't see that girl [any more], we will just forget about her. Ka sikan no alig, konò no maro-ot su ko ogkita ki to boi no du-on goinawa ta kandin di mangkuan ogkasipod ki no ognangon to du-on goinawa ta kandin. Konò no ian ta ig-alig su oghimu ki to maro-ot. That [kind] of attraction isn't bad because when we see a girl and we like her (lit. have breath toward her), yet later on we will be shy to say that we like her. Our attraction isn't a means of attraction to for doing (lit.because we will do) something wrong. [The unreduplicated form of the word alig is described as not a bad emotion because a person is just interested in that person, but the initial interest may pass. That interest can grow into an appropriate relationship leading toward marriage. However, a person who is described as aligon is someone whose interest goes beyond the appropriate. Those people may desire someone who is married and may not be limited to one relationship.] 2v To be drawn to someone, as to God. Ko nig-alig ki to Magbobo-ot, indakoli ki to goinawa to Magbobo-ot. Kandin dò ka nig-alig. When we were drawn to God, our love (lit. breath) for God was increased. He alone was the one who drew us [to Himself]. 3v Affection for someone. Natapid ka pog-alig din no du-on on dakol no goinawa rin. Ka sikan no alig, sagboka rò no boi ka indakoli rin. Sikan ka ligkatan to og-asawo-on din. His affection for someone has become focused (lit. arranged). As for that affection, there is just one girl whom he loves. That is the source of his getting married [to her]. 4vs To be attracted by something such as a pretty design. Ogka-aligan ta ka maroyow no batok. We are attracted by the pretty design. 5v To make a commitment to one another as two who decide to get married. Nig-a-alig sikandan su nokog-un-unawa goinawa ran. Nokogsabut ka sikan. Nokog-iniatoy. Nokogso-ob ka alig dan no darua. They have made a commitment [to each other] because their feelings (lit. breath) werere the same. They have come to an agreement with each other. They desire each other. The attraction of the two [of them] is mutual. 6deriv n A lustful person. Ka otow no ogko-iniat to moon-ing no boi, sikan ka aligon. The person who desires many women, that is a lustful person. 7v To lust after others of opposite sex, not one's spouse. Ko du-on asawa woy ko dalaga, tibò din og-aligon. Whether it is a person who has a spouse or an unmarried lady, he lusts after all [of them].

anak phr.: anak to dalan; phr.: anak to pamubungon. 1n A male or female offspring of an animal or human; son or daughter. 2v To give birth. Ko ogkapanoy ogkatapid ka batò diò to diralom to gotok, oglomulan ka inoy ko og-anak. If the baby (lit. child) in the abdomen has been properly positioned ahead of time, the mother will have it easier when she gives birth. Gabi-i pad nig-anak on ka kuddò ku. Just yesterday my horse gave birth. cf: agud. 2.1v To give birth in some place. - Ogdurugmun ka babuy to og-anakan din. A pig makes a bed for [a place where] she will give birth. 2.2v To give birth to multiple offspring. Ka karpa no ngalap, woy ogpanganak ko ogsilò ka bulan. Carp fish don’t give birth to multiple offspring until the moon comes out. 2.2.1v To give birth multiple times; give birth frequently. Ko du-on og-anak no warò pad nigtu-ig ka anak din no ogpanganak man dò sikandin, oghingaranan no mahariharion no manggianak su malasi og-anak. If someone gives birth when her child is not yet a year old so she is giving birth again, she is called a mother who produces siblings [one after another] because she frequently gives birth. 2.2.2v To reach birthing time. Ko du-on og-insò ko kon-u nanganak ka amboy nu, kagi to songo otow, “Ka ligad dò no allow ka pogpanganak.” If someone asks when your daughter-in-law delivered [her baby], another person will answer, “The previous day was her birthing time”. 2.2.3v Those which are birthed. Ka po-it, ka alu-an, woy ka pantat, ogparagas ogko-otow ka igpanganak dan. The po-it, mudfish and the catfish, are birthed alive (lit. directly live, when it is the time for them to be born [lit. the ones being birthed]. 3deriv n Uterus Ka a-anakan, sikan ka ugpa-an to batò diò gotok to inoy. The uterus, that is the dwelling place of the child in the abdomen of the mother. 4deriv n An adopted child. Ogko-iling ki Ugalinga no nig-uyamu to mgo batò, ogkoimu no anak-anak ran. It’s like Ugalinga who is caring from the childen, they have become heir adopted children. see: uyamuan. 4.1deriv n A stepchild. [A stepchild, that is the child of one's spouse is an anak-anak but not considered to be an uyamuan which is used of an adopted or foster child] 5deriv n Nephew or neice, also a cousin’s child. Si Binitu, songo maka-amung ku rod su anakon ku si Angelina. As for Binitu, he has also become my son-in-law because Angelina is my neice. 6deriv n Anything that has a young offspring; a mother, but especially a nursing mother. Ka mgo ngalap to woig no poit maroyow ka sabow rin to duon iam no manggi-anak su oggatasan. As for the po-it fish [lit. creatures of the water which are po-it], its soup is good for the nursing mother because [her breasts] will produce milk . [Also applies to female animals with young.] 6.1vs To become a nursing mother. Ka ogkamanggi-anak on no boi, sikan ka iam nig-anak no du-on on ogtago-uro-on no batò. Sikan ka ungod din oggibo-on, ogpasusuon, ogsakopuon woy og-uahon. A woman who has become a nursing mother, that is the one who has has newly given birth and now has a a child to care for. [Also applies to female animals who newly give birth] 7deriv n Parent and child doing something together; from parent’s standpoint. 8deriv n A child accompanied by his/her parent or parent accompanying his/her child. Ka tag-anak, ka amoy nigduruma to anak din. A child accompanied by its father, [that is when] the father has accompanied his son/daughter (lit. offspring). Ka amoy no nighondiò to lunsud, tag-anak ka nigduruma to du-on ogbolion dan diò to lunsud. The father who went to town, they are the child with his parent who accompanied each other to buy [something] in town. 8.1n A mother and her child. 9deriv v To hunt for frogs by searching for the frog eggs. Ogpaki-anak ki. We search for the offspring [of frogs]. Ogpakianak ki, ko ogkita ki to atolug to bakbak, du-on ta rò ogpamitawon ka inoy su du-on dò ian to marani ka og-olon. When we hunt for frogs, when we see the eggs of the frog, we will just find the mother [frog] because she will be there closely watching over [her eggs]. 10n Descendent of recent past [That is, descendants who were known andcan be recounted by one’s relatives in contrast to kapunganan which would refer to decendants a long time removed.] see: kapunganan 1.

anoy₁ 1deriv n First; in the beginning. An-anayan, og-umawon nu. Ko konò oggoram, oggongonan ta oyow ogka-antog. First, you call [the sleeping person]. If he doesn't sense it (lit. feel) we take hold of him so that he will be disturbed [from sleep]. Ko du-on oghimuon ta di ko du-on igkasasow ta, na-akoban ka oghimuon ta porom no an-anayan no na-aloy ki diò to dangob no warò ta nato-ori. If we are doing something but if there is something worrying us, the thing we would have done in the beginning is supplanted (lit. layered or covered over.) And then we are distracted to something else so that we didn't accomplish [what we started out to do]. 2adv Since; ever since; from the time that something happened. Anoy ki oglibonglibong no ogtalabao no ogkapolaan ad. Since we keep going back and forth (lit. returning) to [our] work, then I am becoming weary. Anoy a no batò, warò inoy ku no nigsagman kanak woy sagboka bag ka sabinit ku. Ever since I was a [smaller] child, I haven't had a mother to attend to me and I had only one item of clothing. Anoy on no-otow si Huan, diad on ka Magboboot to pusung din su kandin ian ka nigbo-ot ki Huan no no-otow. From the time that John was born, God was in his heart because He [God] was the one who determined that John should be born. syn: aligbat 1; osyn: taan 3. 3adv After having [expected something]...then [there was an unexpected result]. Anoy no og-iman-iman to pila no bulan ka pogtagad dan to ogsanggì no warò nakasanggì. After having anticipated for how many months as they were waiting to harvest, then they were not able to harvest [after all]. [The sense here is that the end result is not that which was anticipated. ] 4adv Habitual. Napolaan ad to batasan nu no anoy kad ogkalasing. I've become tired of your conduct of habitual (lit ever since) drinking. 5deriv n Firstborn child. 5.1v To be born first.