Search results for "ibò"

hoy-u 1v Show compassion or kindness to someone [DB said the concepts of goinawa “breath/love” and uligan “help” are included in the word kooy-u “compassion”. (He said you can also show kindness to animals, such as when you tie the chickens so that people won't hit them.)] 2v To feel sorry for, pity ?? 3adj very compassionate [Ka makolkooy-uon no otow], du-on goinawa rin to tibò no mgo otow. The person who is very compassionate loves everyone. 4Kind, compassionate [Ka makolkooy-u no otow], og-alamon din ko hondo-i ka ogkooy-uan. Du-on ka konò din ogkooy-uan. [The person who is kind] chooses which ones to whom he will be kind. He doesn't show kindness to everyone. 5Kooy-u a nu. Have pity on me.; Show mercy to me. (PH) 6To want sympathy. To plead for mercy. (PH)

indan phr.: Indanan nu man... 1v To remember Og-indanan to mgo batò ko hondo-i ogtugpa ka batu no intugdò dan. The children remember where the stone went down that they threw. see fr.: maningkalagan 2; osyn: pulù 5; see fr.: maningkalagan 1; see fr.: abin 1.1; see fr.: igmaganangon. 2v To reserve. Ko du-on og-indanan ku no kuddò, ogbogoy a to babuy no igpohun-a ku. Sikan ka igmaganangon ku to og-indanan kud on. If there is a horse which I will reserve, I will give a pig as a downpayment (lit. that which I [give] ahead of time). That is my guarantee that I have reserved it. see fr.: hikot 3; see fr.: bakos. 3v establish Ka inggasap no bulu no malintok, sikan ka igsokod to baloybaloy oyow ogko-indanan ko hondo-i ka mgo sinabong woy ka balokun woy ka pusina. The small [pieces of] bamboo which were cut, those were used to measure the diagram of the house to establish where the rooms, the porch and the kitchen will be. 4v set, as a date Ko ogkabatukan ta ka pitsa no du-on liwak, og-indanan ta ka sikan no allow no oglibulung. When we have discovered the date which is open (lit. has room), we set that day for gathering together. [Although the example of reserving a horse and setting a date seem similar, DB sees them as different because one chooses a date because of something important. Also, to reserve a horse is like “putting dibs on” that horse - there is a payment and if the terms of agreement are not met, you won't get the horse. There is no payment involved in setting a date (or “reserving” a day)] 5v That which is used to guarantee. Woy nu ogkapurut ko du-on on ka ig-indan no oghimu to sabut ko kon-u ogkagampusi -- ka ogkatibò on ka igbayad. You won't be able to take it until there is something to use as a guarantee which makes the agreement about when you will pay the remainder -- when [you] pay in full. see: maganangon 1. 6v To promise 7v signify Du-on uran no ogngaranan noy no saginwalu. Sikan ka indanan noy no wawalu no allow ka ungod og-uran. There is [a kind of rain] which we call saginwalu. That signifies to us that it will constantly rain for eight days. 8v To reserve or engage. 9n A sign, something used to signify something Ko du-on sagboka no batò no ungod ogsinogow, sikan ka pog-indan to du-on ogpoko-uma no mangayow. If there is a child who is always crying, that is a sign that raiders will arrive.

kamot 1n A cut field, of rice or other grain; year. Ka agalayan, sikan ka maluag no kamot. Tibò dò no agoloy sikan. Ka agalayan is a wide field. It is all corn. osyn: agalayan. 2v To cut a field; esp with bolo. 2.1v Cut grass, esp. with a bolo [A lawn mower also is said to ogkakamot. (DB says one cannot use an axe to cut a field. That is used for felling trees.)] see: sapsap 1; see: bandoy. 3Time of cutting rice field (latter part of March-month when locusts chirp during the day). see: tu-id 1.

kopal 1adj Thick, as the two sides of a book, a piece of clothing, or paper. Makopal ka kinabò. The shirt is thick. ant: manipis. 2adj Thick, as hair when there is a lot of it. Makopal ka bulbul. Oglituk to dakol lagboy ka bulbul din woy malapung His/her hair is thick. It means that he has a lot of hair and plentiful. 3adj Having a small amount of liquid so that many particles are close together such as a lot of powdered milk added to a small amount of water. Makopal ka gatas su og-anlod ka gatas ko ogtunawon to woig. The milk is thick because the milk sinks to the bottom if it is dissolved/suspended in water. 4adj Close together as forest where are many trees and much vegetation. Makopal ka mgo tibogow diò to napù no mabasag ka lawa rin. [The tibogow is dense there in the flat area and its body is hard.] ant: magalat; see: sokol. 5adj To be volumic, that is, both wide and have much content, as as a field with much vegetation. Makopal ka tira-an. Maluag, mgo lalimma no hitaria bua to ogpamula-an. Sikan dò ka impamula; warò solug no duma. The sugarcane field is capacious. It is wide, about five hetares maybe which has been planted. That is all that has been planted; there is no mixture of anything else. 6adj Many such as flies or lice which which cover a sore. Makopal to kutu. Ogkito-on ka kutu woy ogkogangon ka batò. The lice are many. The lice are visible and the child is covered with sores. Makopal ka langow no oghulun to pa-a. The flies are thick which are swarming on [a someone’s] foot. see: moon-ing. 7adv Thicker [than something else]; thickest Mamakopal ka laplap to kalabow. The carabao's skin is thicker [than the shirt]. 8deriv n thickness Ko og-otian ka nigsamba no woig, songo dangow ka kapokali to danlak. When the flooded [river] water has receeded, the thickness of the silt is a handspan deep.

lalad v 1join together, as villages ?? Ko du-on oghimuon no oglalaron noy, tagsongo punduk, [o] suun. If there are those which we-excl join together, [they are] each a small unit, [or] a satallite (??) [DB gave example of five areas joined together such as Salug, Tala-Ingod, Langilan and Tagpopo-ot which become part of the Langilan area.] 2to bring together?? Ka tibò no pogbuyagon to simbaan, ian oglaad. All the leaders of the church(es), they are the ones who are joined together. Oglaaron din. He will bring them together. [DB if one uses ogpanlaad, it is in one direction, ie. on the way to a meeting, not on the way back (maybe because one is adding to the group on the way to a meeting but the reverse would not be true. Maybe there is another word for dropping off people on the way back.)]

lawang 1v To go down a creek to a river junction. Ko oglaras ki to bo-ogan, oglawang ki to tugda-an no oglapas ki to Liboganan. When we go down a creek [either by foot or by raft], we reach/end up at the river junction and then we cross over the Liboganon [River]. [The underlying meaning of lawang seems to be for two things to come together. In the first example the meaning includes travel to the tugda-an “junction” where the creek comes together with the river. (DB says that one doesn't use the term lawang for crossing a river unless ogdakol ka woig “the water is high”.)] 2v To break through, as of the space between two fields. Di ka olatan dan, warò dan poglawang to pogkamot. Warò dan pogtomua to pogkamot. But in cutting, they have not broken through the space between them. They have not joined the two fields by cutting. [When people make fields side by side, they often do not clear the space between them so the two fields will not be joined. The purpose is to prevent the fire of one field from burning into the other if one person burns first.] see: lagbas. 3join Ko nigkamot ka diò limang to bubungan no nakagomow kad diò to songo du-on kamot, nokoglawang ka to olin kamot. Nokogtomu on. If you cut a field on one side of a mountain and happened to go over the summit to another person who had a field, you would have joined the two fields. They would have come together. see: tomu 1. 4v To have network of connections Ka mgo lugì to tabunan to takubung, ogpoglawanglawangon diò to diralom to oghimuan dan to salag. The holes of the marmot’s mound is connected underneath to the places where they make their nests. [This contrasts with the above example of the fields being joined because the fields do not have a network of connections between them.] see: sumpul. 5v To pass through, or cross over to the other side, as of a river. Ko niglanog ka Liboganon, oglawangon ta rò to oglapas to woig to ogpangali to mundù. When the Liboganon River floods, we just pass through it to cross to the other side of the river to dig camotes. Usì, maniò to nakalawang ka to dakol ka lanog? Friend why did you have to cross over [the river] when the flooding was excessive? Ogpakalawang ka to sikan no woig ko ogbayò ka to tulay. You cross over that river when you pass across a bridge. [One can cross a swollen river by wading, swimming or using some conveyance. The sense is that one traverses and comes out on the other side.] 6v To cross over each other as bridges of highways that pass over each other. Ogpokoglawanglawan ka mgo tulay to mgo kalasara. The bridges of the highways cross over each other.