Search results for "Funeral"

amabugoolubugoLugandanburial gift; condolence money collected at a funeral that is given by mourners to the relatives of the deceased2.6.6.3Funeral4.4.4.2Show sympathy, support6.8.3.1Give, donate2.6.6.5Bury

ehijukizoebijukizonmemorial ceremony for s.b. who died2.6.6.3Funeral4.2.2.1Ceremony3.2.6Remember4.2.2.3Celebrate

esiihoesiihoncondolence gift; money given to the bereaved to express solidarity and sympathy2.6.6.3Funeral4.4.4.2Show sympathy, support6.8.3.1Give, donate2.6.6.5Bury

esuukaamasuukan1sheet of cloth that is not sewn into a garment6.6.1Working with cloth6.6.1.1Cloth2sewn cloth without sleeves5.3Clothing5.3.4Clothes for special occasions3shroud; sheet wrapped around the dead body before burial2.6.6.3Funeral7.3.7.2Wrap2.6.6.5Bury4bed sheet; cloth to cover the body with when sleeping5.1.1.3Bed

ohubihavar.ohubihiravannounce, inform about a deathSibambihiiye seefe nafuuye.They didn’t inform me of our father’s death.2.6.6.3Funeral3.5.1.2.1Announce3.2.3.1Known, unknown3.5.3.2Information3.5.9Mass communication3.5.2.2News, message

ohufiiravlose for good; be lost permanently, esp. a death of s.b., but also said of a possession one never expects to find againFiriiye abaatu bangi mu lima lino.I have lost a lot of people this season.2.6.6Die7.6.3Lose, misplaceohufiiraŋovdie suddenly2.6.6Dieohufiirwav1be bereaved4.1.9.3Widow, widower2.6.6.3Funeral2.6.6Die2lose; miss s.b. or s.t.7.6.3Lose, misplaceohufiisav1lose; have s.b. die2.6.6Die2spoil, of food4.3.4.6.1Spoil8.3.7.8Decay

ohwabya olumbevIdiom. perform the last funeral rite. This is the final ceremony for burying a dead person. It is done after weeks, months or years.2.6.6.3Funeralder. ofolumbe

ohwalavprepare a bed for sleeping in it5.1.1.3Bedohwala amasanjav1prepare a bed using dry banana leaves5.1.1.3Bed2Idiom. keep vigil2.6.6.3Funeral3.1.2.1Alertohwaliisavmake s.t. or s.b. lie down7.1.3Lie down2.4.5Rest5.7.1Go to sleep5.7Sleepohwalula2vput away bedding after sleeping on it5.1.1.3Bedohweyalavlie down prostrate; down flat7.1.3Lie down

ohwala amasanjav1prepare a bed using dry banana leaves5.1.1.3Bed2Idiom. keep vigil2.6.6.3Funeral3.1.2.1Alertder. ofohwala

ohwohyav1roast; put food directly on fire so as to cook itEngoho bayiriye njohye; sibayirungire.The chicken was roasted before eating; it was not boiled.5.2.1.1Cooking methods5.5Fire2scorch; apply heat to s.t. to shrivel itOmumwi gwaduhire gwohya ebirime.The sun has scorched the crops.5.5.4Burn1.1.1Sun5.2.1.1Cooking methods3burn set fire to s.t. so as to roast it or to burn it to cindersEhitali higenderere abaana basobola ohwohya enju ni bagudusa omuliro.Accidentally, children can burn a house when playing with fire.5.5.1Light a fire5.5.4Burn8.3.4Hot5.5Fireeŋongo eyʼohwohyanoffering, sacrifice for burning3.3.5Offer6.8.3.1Give, donate4.9.5.5Offering, sacrifice4.8.4.3Appeaseohwohya ahasanjavperform a traditional ceremony where dry banana leaves used for a bed by the bereaved are burnt three days (for a male corpse) or four days after burial (for a female corpse)2.6.6.3Funeral2.6.6.5Bury

ohwohya ahasanjavperform a traditional ceremony where dry banana leaves used for a bed by the bereaved are burnt three days (for a male corpse) or four days after burial (for a female corpse)2.6.6.3Funeral2.6.6.5Buryder. ofohwohya

olumbeenyimben1illness; disease2.5.1Sick2.5.2Disease2funeral2.6.6.3Funeral2.6.6.5Buryohuŋambya olumbevinfect with a disease; transmit sickness2.5.1Sick2.5.2Disease2.5.5Cause of diseaseohwabya olumbevIdiom. perform the last funeral rite. This is the final ceremony for burying a dead person. It is done after weeks, months or years.2.6.6.3Funeralohwala olumbevIdiom. keep vigil3.1.2.1Alertolumbe lwʼobuhwedindisease that is sexually transmitted2.5.1Sick2.6.2.3Sexual immorality2.5.2Diseaseolumbe lwomuhidanstomach illness2.5.2.3Stomach illness

omugayireemigayiren1Bark-cloth fig; tree that grows up to 20m tall, and whose bark is processed into bark cloth for wearing or for wrapping corpsesOmugayire gulimo ehiŋolu hyʼepandu ehiraŋi.The bark cloth tree provides very good shade for banana trees.sp. Ficus natalensis fam. Moraceae1.5.1Tree2sheet beaten out of the bark of a bark cloth treeHalehale abasinde bambalanga emigayire ni baja ohuhyala.Long ago men used to wear bark cloths when going to visit.6.2.5.4Plant product5.3.3Traditional clothing5.3.4Clothes for special occasions1.5.5Parts of a plant6.6.1.1Cloth3robes of bark cloth or a figurative term for clothingEngubo yʼomusinde enpibwa mu mugayire.Man’s clothing sewn from a bark-cloth.6.2.5.4Plant product5.3.3Traditional clothing5.3.4Clothes for special occasions1.5.5Parts of a plant6.6.1.1Cloth4burial gift; condolence money collected at a funeralBafunire esiringi emitwalo ebiri ejʼemigayire.They obtained 20,000 shillings as burial fees.2.6.6.3Funeral4.4.4.2Show sympathy, support6.8.3.1Give, donate2.6.6.5Bury

omusasaemisasansecond funeral ceremony that is celebrated long after the death itselfOhuhola omusasa.To hold a second funeral.2.6.6.3Funeral