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ak tikimidiomSurmatngan árár án long palai rumrum káián asir; sung ngo ardos mai bálbál pasEnglishgreeting; expression of thanksmy food (is) your fecesThis is a scatological expression meaning literally `give me your feces to eat'. It is a greeting expressing great gladness and joy at seeing the person again, also an expression of thanks indicating deep gratitude. The implication of this is strong camaraderie, indicating that there is nothing hindering fellowship or relationship, no problems or heavies between us. When coupled with a command or request, it has the effect of the English 'please'.ani balamorahitiking4.1Relationships3.5.3.1Word3.5.1Sayinteresting idiom; relationship; speak
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ani balamidiomSurworwor án arabálbálEnglishpleaseeating your stomachThis is equivalent to the English 'please', as in politely requesting help from someone.Kesi pupunkak anang Nokon ngo a nem i dos i kesá kalik ki na parai sang á kuir wor án arabálbál min ngoromin, “Kauh, han be unáng kip kak te kámnah. Iau ani á balam.”An old man down at Nokon when he wants to command a child then he will say this word of soothing like this, "Boy, go now (and) get my some fire (get some fire for me). I eat your stomach (please)."ak tikimbalang3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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arat i pokon kalkalungidiomSurláklák namurwai sápkin tatalen káián lite ki uk han kai on mulEnglishfollow another's lead and get in troublebiting in the twisted placeTan kalilik tepák di lu long bengtai tan táit imi aratintin, pasi komiti til Nokon ák inau i tan kaukak til Nokon suri koion da arat i pokon kalkalung káián tan kalilik erei da káp tur i nagogon.Young men from far away messed up things at the school, resulting in the headman from Nokon exhorted the young men from Nokon so they would not follow the lead of those other young men lest they end up being courted.dokta pasarat/árti4.1Relationships3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom; relationship
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aru i kermenidiomSurparai kesi táit ma namur bul ák parai lite táitEnglishinsincere; hypocriticaltwo tonguesÁi Morot tungu be a parai ngo na han ái memba i pákánbung ngo da batbat i aratintin á tan kalilik, má namur bul ák parai ngo kápnate han. Tan kálámul kápte di lu laes suri matngan er aru i kermen.Morot quite a while ago said the member would come when the children closed the school (finished the school year), and later instead he said that he would not come. People are not happy about that kind of two tongues (hypocrisy).kermangru3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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bari nisunidiomSurangagur pasiEnglishdeceive; fool; take advantage of; play a confidence trick onTok Pisinsutim nus bilong man na pulim ol samting bilong enpierce his/her noseThis is the idea of deceiving by untruths that sound good and true and are appealing. The picture is of piercing a hole in a person's nose, then pullling him into what you want him to do or believe. It can also refer to being unfaithful to one's spouse.Ái Otto a parai singin natun ngo na tar te pirán tabal uri hul aratintin si natun. Ái natun ák lala kis monai piran tabal erei ngo na tari ái Otto má kápate lu hut. Ki ák parai ngo, "Wa, a tu bari nisung sang ái tata. Kápate tar te pirán tabal uri kak hul aratintin."Otto said to his child that he would give some money to pay for his schooling. His child waited a long time for that money that Otto would give but it did not come. Then he said, "Why, Dad just deceived"/tricked me. He did not give any money for paying for my schooling.nisung4.1Relationships3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom; relationship
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bál konmiidiomSurkápte kosoi; kápte para sarai táit iau longrai ngo di longoi mam iauEnglishkeep to oneself; endure; put up with; refuse to paybackstomach swallowThis includes the ideas of hearing gossip but not spreading it, keeping information to oneself, not retaliating against someone else's anger at you, enduring quietly and without fighting back, either verbally or physically.Pákánbung matananu di mos kalar uri iau suri káp iau te para talsai si di ngo tan asir da hut, káp iau te para te táit mam di. Bos worwor no di lápkai uri iau, iau tu bál konmi sár má káp iau te kosoi kándi worwor.When the people were angry at me because I did not inform them that guests would be coming, I did not say anything to them. All the talk they threw at me, I just only endured it and did not respond to their talk.pam ngus kárikonam/konmi3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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báng i arasaidiomSura talas án mudán i kábungbungEnglishdaybreak; dawnthe next day cracks opentaránsi8.4.1Period of time3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom; time
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bop i bálidiomSurlala nem on; hol pagas onEnglishbeloved; dear; precious; eager; importantlaying on/in his stomachThis idiom indicates something that is important to one's life. I do not loan out my glasses because they bop_i_balang, i.e. I need them, they are important to me.A bop i bál git suri gita agasgas pasi á kálámul er a togor mam git, má ái sang kápate nem i ararguna tiklik mam git.Our strong desire is (we are eager, it is important to us) to please that man who was angry with us, and/but he himself does not want to have a relationship together with us.Kak siot er a girgirot i páplun iau lala nem on, má tukes sár erei á kak siot a bop i balang on.My shirt whose colour is multi-coloured I greatly like it, and/but there is only one there of my shirts that is dear to me.mámnai4.1Relationships4.9.7.2Christianity3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom; lotu; relationship
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bop teken kimidiomSursasam a bop i marán kalangEnglishincapacitated; sick long-term; bedridden; prostratelying (on the) dregs of a matThis refers to remaining in bed for a long time because of a long-term illness, and it implies not recovering but dying in the end. It contrasts with the idea of bopbop_mai_sasam (lying with sickness), which is used for shorter periods of sickness.Kálámul imunang a sasam pasi marán kalang má kápte má a lu láklák. A ngoro ák bop teken kim má mai sasam imunang.That man down there has been sick for many months and he is not walking now/anymore. It is like he is incapacitated/bedridden with that sickness down there.kis i risán tarangteken13.5.3.1Word2.5.1Sickinteresting idiom; sickness
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boptin maitransitive serial verbSurkápte a longoi himEnglishfailing to do one's job; irresponsible; unreliablesleep with itTungu sang má di tari singin á him erei má kápte a lu longoi be. Kán tu boptin sár mai.Quite a while previously they gave to him that work and he did not do it yet. He's been irresponsible with (doing his job).mam/mai3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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bumbum matintransitive serial verbSurgong kári namnam; dungi marán namnam i ngudunEnglishgluttonous; greedy over food; filling one's mouth with foodfull mouth until dyingIau mákái kalik er a lu lala dungi sang á namnam i ngudun. Wa a taba kán bumbum mat sang.I saw that fellow putting very much food into his mouth. Why he's very greedy/he stuffs himself.bumtám bumbum mat3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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damdam limidiomSura tu mudán sáksákEnglishlacking food; insufficient foodlicking one's handsA tu damdam lim á namnam minái. Kápte gima mas on kabin a tu mudán sár má kápate arwat mam gim no.This food is insufficient. We will not be full on it because it is only just a little bit and it is not enough for us all.limangdami3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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dorah i mansinidiomSura rah i kán mangmangehEnglishdeadhis breathing has setmansing2.1Body3.5.3.1Wordbody act; interesting idiom
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gáwár i holidiomSurkápte má a gasgas i hol; ákte rah má nemnemEnglishgiven up; no longer interestedhis thinking/mind is coldThis expresses one's losing interest in something that was supposed to happen, but as time drags on without it happening, one finally gives up or no longer cares.3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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hat kisidiomSurkis áklis; konom kápate mánán i sua limEnglishboulder; bedrock; immoveable; stingystone sittingThis refers to a large rock that it is impossible to move. It is used to refer to the idea of 'rock of ages'. It's a symbol for something that is eternal. It is also used of a wealthy man who does not share his wealth.hat23.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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hom saraintransitive serial verbSurpekpek saraEnglishdefecate in an inappropriate placeplay scatter/aroundKalilik, iau mákái ngo gam lu hom sara iamuni kon mák tuan sák sang á pokon imuni. Koion gama lu pekpek sara iamuni ngorer kabin git lu kis on á kon imuni.Children, I see that you all defecate out on the beach and that place out there is very bad indeed. Don't defecate all over out there like that because we sit on the beach out there.Matananu di áir kári malar mai got suri koion na sol á bor nák hom sara i malar.People fence off the village with bamboo so a pig will not enter and defecate in the village.sara23.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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hushus dáridiomSurráin a hus i pákánbung kán tu pos i nasEnglishrain typefalling bloodThis describes rain that is falling while the sun continues to shine. It is believed to indicate someone is soon going to die.dáranghusráin3.5.3.1Word1.1.3Weather4.3.9.1Customanthro; interesting idiom; weather
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kalik án sálidiomSurkalik a káhái ái mámán má kápte di talas suri kákánEnglishbastard; illegitimate childchild of the roadThis specifically refers to a child whose father is unknown or remains unnamed by the mother.natun sálsál13.5.3.1Word2Personinteresting idiom; person
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káhái uri armongohidiomSurwák a káhái kalik má kápte di talas suri kákánEnglishbirth an illegitimate childgive birth into the airThis is said of a woman who gives birth to a child, but it is unclear who the father is. A child born in this way is referred to as kalik_án_sál (child of the road) or natun_sál (the road's child).ur1káhái23.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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káik uri bálidiomSuraratintin má hol páptai táit káián liteEnglishpass on knowledge and traditions from one generation to the nextvomit into his stomachThis can be passing on both good and bad practices.Ái kauh a atintini ái kán titi mái tan táit án latlat má ákte hol pápta noi sang. Má onin ák lu him má mai kabin ákte káik uri bál sang ái kán titi.The boy, his grandfather taught him with the things of healing and he did not forget anything. And today he works with them because his grandfather vomited into his stomach (passed on knowledge to him).ur14.1Relationships3.5.3.1Word4.3.9.1Customanthro; interesting idiom; relationship
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káp melek (sár) (mul)idiomSursangsangar, sangarEnglishimmediatelynot quickly (only) (also)Any combination of káp_melek with the above words in parentheses, or without them, renders the same meaning.Tan tamelo imi iau soi a tu sangsangar sang i kán pákta. Tungu sár iau soi, má onin ákte hu má. Kápate dol be pákánbung, ki káp melek sár mul mák lu hu.Those watermelons up there I planted, their growing is really fast. Just a while ago I planted them, and now they have already born fruit. It was not yet a long time, then immediately they bore fruit.3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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káp teken gumgumidiomSurarpangia i tas má konEnglishedge of sea and beach; meeting of sea and landno crab fecesThis idiom describes where the beach meets the ocean waves, where the gumgum (crab type) live, and where the ocean waves wash away any feces left by crabs or other creatures.pirteken gumgumgumgum1tiking3.5.3.1Word8.5Location1.7Nature, environmentinteresting idiom; location; nature
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kápán urtarangidiomEnglishouter skin cells; epidermisskin of a spiritThis is the very outer layer of skin that comes off easily by scratching or rubbing. Beneath that is the kápán_muswan (true skin).2.1Body3.5.3.1Wordbody part human; interesting idiom
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káu i bus kokokidiomSurmur i sápkin tatalen kán liteEnglishfollowing another's bad example or leadingcrawl along a (weak and easily broken) vineThis connotes following someone else's lead on doing something which one may or may not realize is a bad thing to do, or realizing it is bad but refusing to believe there will be consequences. The idiom expresses crawling along a weak vine and falling when the vine breaks.Kalilik, ngo gam mur i tatalen án mismuk i sápkin mismuk, ki a ngoro gam káu i bus kokok kabin ngo gama han banai sápkin wán namur.Guys, if you all follow the behaviour of smoking bad smoking (marijuana), then it is like you are following a bad example because you will meet up with a bad result/consequence later.bus kokokkáu13.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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kir niánidiomSurtatalen ákte ekesi kis máEnglishbecome a habit; entrenched; rootedshovel its placeThis connotes someone or something shoveling out a place for itself, and includes the meanings of become a fixture, become entrenched, make space in something, make a dwelling.Tatalen án bau mai dan rakrakai ákte ekesi kis má i kán liu á kaukak erei. Káp sang má na long palai, ákte kir nián sang má.The behaviour of being drunk with strong water (liquor) is already permanently sitting in the life of that young man. He will definitely not get rid of it, it is already entrenched.kiri3.5.3.1Wordinteresting idiom
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