Search results for "Medicine"

arabisintransitive verbSurarkanusEnglishspit on someoneThis includes the custom of spitting chewed ginger on someone for curing illness or to fortify dancers.Tan gengen kalilik ngo di arpilgut arliu i di, ki di lu longoi á tatalen án arkanus. Te pákán di lu mumuk pasi dan mai ngus di má dik arabis arliu i di mai.The little kids when they are angry with each other, then they do the custom of spitting. Sometimes they suck up water with their mouths and then spit on each other with it.abis2.1Body2.5.7.2Medicine4.3.9.1Customanthro; body act; medicine
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benealienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishplant typeBene leaves are used for curing gáwár (chills, malaria).1.5Plant2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; tree/plant
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buáhalienable nounSurngisán sukEnglishvine typeBuáh is a kind of vine that is there in the coconut groves and along the beach. It is not possible to tie with it. It is long and crawls along the grass. Its leaves are like sandpaper. Some women scrub saucepans with the leaves of buáh. And its leaves they also use to do magic cures on a person if he is sick with malaria.suktám soso poron buáh2.5.7.2Medicine1.5.3Grass, herb, vinemedicine; vine
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dadandandanalienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishtree typeThe dadan is a tree whose leaves are a little like the leaves of the pak. Some use its leaves to get rid of grille (skin disease). And some people use it to cure malaria. And the fruit of the dadan looks a bit like the nurat (noni) fruit, but they do not eat the fruit of the dadan.
1.5Plant2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; tree/plant
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dododongintransitive verbSuraptur kaleng i páplunEnglishhealthy again; cured2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine
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gorgor11alienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishplant typeGorgor is just like the goi also, its leaves and its trunk are like it too. This thing just grows scattered around the jungle. Its leaves are long and slender just like the goi leaves. They cut the leaves of the gorgor to cover a mumu with. Sometimes they make temporary shelters in the jungle, then they get gorgor leaves and they put them on top of the shelters. Gorgor leaves are used to taboo things. (Additional information: Gorgor leaves are used in curing headaches, and water from this plant is used by girl initiates for bathing. When no water is available, as in walking in the jungle, this plant can be cut to suck out moisture.)lamuminminlau1.5Plant2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; tree/plant2transitive verbEnglishtabootam1tartaring4.3.9.1Customanthro
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guawaEnglishalienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishtree type; guavaThe guawa they brought from far away to us here. Its fruit is edible, and its leaves they use like medicine to heal certain illnesses like coughing and fever and malaria. (The wood of) its trunk is very hard.1.5Plant2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; tree/plant
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iniatintransitive verbEnglishmagic (generic term)This describes working with various kinds of magic, including healing as well as calling on the power of evil spirits. It includes the idea of false prophecy, and also composing songs or receiving them from a spirit.latlatwah12.5.7.2Medicine4.3.9.1Customanthro; medicine
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kotlininalienable nounEnglishseed; pillTok Pisinsit bilong tonpasin1.5Plant2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; tree/plant
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kunus / kunsisyncopated verbSurpákán kubau di giksai turán kabang; salsi mai kunusEnglishhealThis is to perform a healing measure which involves putting leaves mixed with lime powder on a painful part of the body.Koner a rangrang i keken, gama kip te pákán kubau má gamák giksai turán kabang má gamák sásai i keken. Ngo gama kunsi mai pákán kubau ngorer, ki na rah á rangrang erei i keken.That one whose leg is hurting, you should get some tree leaves and scrub them with lime powder and rub them on his leg. If you will perform the healing measure with tree leaves like that, then that pain in his leg will be finished.2.5.7.2Medicine4.3.9.1Customanthro; medicine
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latlatdahilintransitive verbSurhim mai táit suri akuluknai liu ngo táitEnglishwhite magic; good magicThis refers to what is considered good or white magic, i.e. curing sickness, garden fertility, making pigs fat, causing a child to crawl or walk or stop crying, making fish bite. In ancestral times, this also included the practice of strengthening a man's hands for fighting.Tám latlat masik sár a mánán i latlat ur on á sasam erei. Má kápte kes a arwat mul suri long palai.Only a healer alone knows the magic for that sickness. But no one else is able to remove it.dahiliniatwah1maleraobotoitám latlatwulgomar/gomri; latwai2.5.7.2Medicine4.3.9.1Customanthro; medicine
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latwa-itransitive verbSurhim mai táit suri akuluknai liu ngo táitEnglishhelp through magicThis is white magic applied to curing sickness or improving the fertility of one's garden through praying to spirits, applying lime powder, or various other means known privately.Ái tata a mánán i latwai kán pokon suri ák lu lain kopkom kuluk i kán balbal. Má táit a lu longoi mai kán pokon, ái sang a mánán on, má kápte kes mul a mánán.Daddy knew how to do magic for his garden so his root vegetables grew well. And/but the thing he did with his garden, he himself knew it, and no one else knew.latlat2.5.7.2Medicine4.3.9.1Customanthro; medicine
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márásinTok Pisinalienable nounSurtáit a ngin on á kálámul suri aliwi tili sasam ngo a oboi i kán manu suri nák mahEnglishmedicine2.5.1Sick2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; sickness
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mimiaalienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishtree type; pawpaw; papayaTok PisinpopoMimia they plant to get the fruit to eat. The fruit of the mimia is good food and it has very good flavor. The leaves of the mimia are just like the leaves of the lam. The mimia has many uses. Every part of the mimia they use for healing. There is a book that explains about what kind of work/use each part of the mimia does.tapeka2wán mimia1.5Plant5.2Food2.5.7.2Medicinefood; medicine; tree/plant
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mulis án kuskusalienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishtree type; lemoncitrus for dyeingThe mulis_án_kuskus they also plant, but it is sour when they eat it. Here among us they plant this kind of citrus only for dyeing (hair). Some people dye with it so their hair becomes white, and some when there are lice sores on their heads, then they dye with this citrus so their sores become healed/dried up. And some others get its juice to cook greens or fish with it. And today they also get it for cooking off rust from a file for sharpening knives. Its fruit is a bit smaller than the orange. The fruit of this citrus when it is close to ripe, then its colour is green. And when it’s ripe, then its colour is yellow.kuskus2mulis1.5Plant5.2Food2.5.7.2Medicinefood; medicine; tree/plant
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rikrikalienable nounEnglishkunai grass typeRikrik is like kunai, and its leaves are long just like kunai. Its smell is nicely fragrant and as a result they get it for lom (fragrant leaves). This thing they steam a person with if he is sick with malaria. They get the leaves and they boil them in a pot, and when it is well cooked then they steam the person with the steam.pokori1.5Plant2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; tree/plant
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taululalienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishplant typeThe taulul is a thing that grows and crawls along the ground putting down roots. Its leaves are small and round. This thing grows among the coconut groves, and if there are no betel pepper leaves, then they get the leaves of this plant and they chew them with betel nut and powdered lime. (Additional information: Taulul leaves are used in curing lul_pos (headache, migraine).)1.5Plant2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; tree/plant
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tám angagur án naul bimalienable nounSurtám latlat a lu mákái táit i libung ngorer i mihmih ngo mákmákEnglishhealerliar of earthThis implies not seeing God's revelation, but rather seeing what comes from earth instead, so a local healer that relies on something other than God's help.naul bimtám12.5.7.2Medicine2Person4.3.9.1Customanthro; medicine; person
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ululahululahiululah-itransitive verb taking onSuraraliu; long palai mai kabang ngo mánáp ngo mai worwor; aliu kalengnaiEnglishcure; reverseApparently this verb can occur as both an on verb, as in the following example, and as a regular transitive verb with an -i ending.Kak poron bu inang a tartaring on ái Tom. Má kápte be a ululah on suri dák sari.My betel nut grove down coast Tom did preventive sorcery on it (to keep people from stealing). And he has not yet reversed it so they could climb it (to get betel nut).2.5.1Sick2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; sickness
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