Search results for "Custom"

bor mutalienable nounEnglishpig that completes an exchangepig brokenThis refers to a pig that breaks the tie established when one person helps out another by giving a pig to him for a feast. The receiver then pays back the pig with another pig given to the original giver. This is the bor_mut. The original giver, now receiving a pig, has the option of assigning it as a bor_uri_kámnah or putting it aside for another use later.bor1bor uri kámnahmut14.3.9.1Customanthro
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bor uri kámnahalienable nounEnglishpig for cooking and eatingpig for the fireThis refers to a pig assigned by a feast supervisor to be mumued for eating rather than being put aside for a different day.bor1bur mut5.2Food4.3.9.1Customanthro; food
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bualienable nounEnglishbetel nutTok Pisinbuaiekek2kengkohkor3mamaradas bu4.3.9.1Customanthro
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bukur / bukrisyncopated verbSurobop kabang ngo namnam i kálámul a milEnglishmark a dancerTok Pisinputim kabang long man o meri long taim bilong singsingThis is to put lime powder or food on someone who is dancing, and this fun custom is usually done by a person of the opposite moiety to the dancer, and may involve only certain clans who do this to each other. The dancer must then 'buy' the person with money.Tan wák di lala bukri tan kalilik di mil. Di oboi kabang i bahin tan kalilik suri namur tan kalilik er da tar palai tan wák er di bukur mam te pirán tabal.The women did a lot of putting (lime powder) on the guys who were dancing. They put lime powder on the backs of the guys so that later those guys would pay off those women who put (lime powder) with some money.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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bulaualienable nounEnglishspirit typeThis is a type of tesit (spirit) able to change people's minds about doing things they plan to do.tesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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buntiralienable nounSurgegenEnglishrow in a singsingbásbuntir4.3.9.1Customanthro
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bungbungalienable noun1EnglishheaddressTok Pisinbilas bilong hetFor differentiation of headdresses and their parts, see kangal.
balaparipbangbang2biarkamrogoskangal4.3.9.1Customanthro
2Englishcockscomb2.1Bodybody part non-human
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burbur1transitive verbSurubi kálámul urami lolon sokopanaEnglishbeating as a form of initiationThis custom is performed on new participants, males only, when an urtarang (evil spirit) cries or at the time of a tobuán (secret society dance). The new person bows over and is beaten with bus (vine type).I taul sokopana, ainpidik sár a lu burbur i kálámul ngo a hutngin mákái sokopana.At the time of the evil spirit crying, only the spirit expert beats the boys/men who are newly/for the first time seeing the evil spirit.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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busekalienable nounEnglishapron-like covering traditionally made with leavesTok Pisinmalo4.3.9.1Customanthro
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bututalienable nounSurkesi sángul á reuEnglishten strings of shell moneyThis represents ten strings of shell money tied together, usually for the purpose of purchasing pigs at a feast. This is done as a way of displaying wealth.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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dinalienable nounEnglishinsect typeThe din is a thing that has wings and it is green in color. This thing looks a bit like a sikiu (grasshopper). The din lives along the trunk of a tree. The belief in Sursurunga, they say like this about it, if a child wets his bed a lot, then they will catch a din and then they will put it on the penis of the child (hold it by its wings and move it around above the penis) so that he won’t wet his bed at night.rohon bát1.6.1.7Insect4.3.9.1Customanthro; insect
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dok-oi2transitive verbSurhul pasiEnglishpurchaseThis includes purchasing the rights to magic implements or knowledge, such as a tobuán (secret society dance).Wilwil minái iau hul pasi si Tomilon. A para sirai mai K50 pasi iak dokoi singin má onin áng kaiak má.This bicycle I bought from Tomilon. He said (he would) sell it with/for K50 resulting in I purchased it from him and now it is mine.huliardok4.3.9.1Customanthro
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gegeninalienable noun1Surtahtahna; bohEnglishline; sentence; columnTan kálámul er di saksak di tahna di uri kesi sángul á tahtahna. I keskeskesá gegen er a lu lim á kálámul di lu tur on.Those people who were singing they lined themselves into ten lines. Each of those lines there were five people standing in it.tahtahna2SurrákánEnglishlineage; clan; moiety; social groupingTok Pisinlainkabinhunmát1rákán4.2.1Come together, form a group4.1.9Kinship4.3.9.1Customanthro; group; kinship
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get1alienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishtree typeGet is a tree/plant and there are two kinds. One grows in the jungle. This kind they call get_rokoi (wild get). And one/another they plant in the village like other flowers/decorative village plants. This kind of get from the village has varied colors of leaves. Both kinds of get, that one from the jungle and from the village, the leaves of both are long and slender. (Additional information: Get are often planted at gravesites.)nobon1.5Plant4.3.9.1Customanthro; tree/plant
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gokgok1intransitive verbEnglishconvulseagokgokoi2alienable nounEnglishepilepsyTraditionally epilepsy was believed to be associated with evil spirits and eating things they had touched. More recently, some realize the value of medicine in treating epilepsy, and it is considered more of an illness without as much spirit association.2.5.1Sick4.3.9.1Customanthro; sickness
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gomar / gomrisyncopated verbSursalsi lotEnglishrub using healing magicThis is used of rubbing a boil so it will not get any worse. It includes saying certain words while rubbing.Te á kálámul sár di mánán i gomar lot. Suri gomri lot, wa di lu salsalus on sár mam te matngan worwor erei di sang di mánán on. Kesi matngan latlat sang.Only some people know how to heal a boil by rubbing. To heal a boil by rubbing, why they keep rubbing it (along) with (saying) some kind of talk they themselves know. It is a kind of healing.latlat4.3.9.1Customanthro
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gomgomalienable nounEnglishfeast typeThis feast is given to result in or signify freedom from obligation. It may be given after returning from jail to finish off the wrong done, and results in the person being truly free. It is likened to an osmapak (sacrificial offering). Another type is given when a dead relative's basket and pipe are burned. Still another kind is the siusiu_kán_kalik (feast for a newborn).longsit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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gorgor11alienable nounSurngisán kubauEnglishplant typeGorgor is just like the goi also, its leaves and its trunk are like it too. This thing just grows scattered around the jungle. Its leaves are long and slender just like the goi leaves. They cut the leaves of the gorgor to cover a mumu with. Sometimes they make temporary shelters in the jungle, then they get gorgor leaves and they put them on top of the shelters. Gorgor leaves are used to taboo things. (Additional information: Gorgor leaves are used in curing headaches, and water from this plant is used by girl initiates for bathing. When no water is available, as in walking in the jungle, this plant can be cut to suck out moisture.)lamuminminlau1.5Plant2.5.7.2Medicinemedicine; tree/plant2transitive verbEnglishtabootam1tartaring4.3.9.1Customanthro
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hauhauintransitive verbSurkis talum kán matananuEnglishmeetingWhile this can refer to any meeting of people together, it is often used specifically to refer to nginim_pol, one of the mortuary feasts following a death.Kam worwor er u parai singing ngo ina ámrai ur singin matananu, iakte parai má si di i pákánbung án hauhau ami Tekedan. Má pákánbung erei a lain pákánbung sang kabin marán kálámul di kis talum.That talk of yours you said to me that I should pass on to the people, I said it to them at the time of the meeting in Tekedan. That time was a very good time because many people were assembled together.hau talumhau4.3.9.1Customanthro
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hikalienable nounEnglishdrum type; slit gongTok PisingaramutThis drum is made from a log hollowed out and beaten with a stick or the stalk of the gáh vine to make a drum sound. Long ago the hik was used to signal deaths, visitors, men to gather for battle, and for announcing feast times.garap4.2.3Music4.3.9.1Customanthro; music
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homhom talum1intransitive serial verbEnglishplaying together2alienable nounEnglishage-mateThis term describes the people one grows up with, plays with in the village, attends school with.4.1Relationships4.3.9.1Customanthro; relationship
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hulhul kerehintransitive serial verbSurhuli ololohEnglishtoken repaying of a caregiver's carebuying unreciprocatedThis is part of completing widowhood ceremonies.huhulkereh14.3.9.1Customanthro
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hulhul ngudunidiom1Suranokwai ngudun kálámul ngo bor a longoi sápkin mai ngudunEnglishpay compensation; pay a finebuying his mouthThis refers to paying a fine or compensation for a wrong one is responsible for, as paying compensation to a person whose garden your pig has destroyed, or paying a fine for saying foul language to another.Kán bor ái wowo a tu lu bal kokon sang i num si Dion, pasi gim tu lu bal anokwai kán bor mai pirán tabal. Kápte bul gim haunges i bal hulhul ngudun bor.Grandmother's pig repeatedly roots around in John's garden, resulting in we keep on straightening/compensating for her pig with money. We do not in turn (we have no chance to) rest from again buying the pig's mouth (paying compensation for his rooting/eating).2Surhuli namnam a mokoiEnglishpayback; reciprocateThis is part of widowhood ceremonies where the child of a man who has died pays a token amount to his father's relatives so he can again eat the kind of food his father used to provide for him.huhulngudung4.1Relationships4.3.9.1Customanthro; relationship
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hushus dáridiomSurráin a hus i pákánbung kán tu pos i nasEnglishrain typefalling bloodThis describes rain that is falling while the sun continues to shine. It is believed to indicate someone is soon going to die.dáranghusráin3.5.3.1Word1.1.3Weather4.3.9.1Customanthro; interesting idiom; weather
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iahintransitive verbSurtangsi minatEnglishwailThis is a custom done by women only. Men cry more quietly.Ngo kálámul a mat má dik han á tan wák suri tangsi, ki di lu parai ngo tan wák di han suri iah i iátin buli.When a person dies and the women go to cry for him, then they say that the women go to wail on top of/over the corpse.iahwai4.3.9.1Customanthro
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