Search results for "Custom"

Malaialienable nounEnglishmoiety nameThis moiety is called the 'smol pisin' (small clan) because its totem, the tárgau (small eagle), is a smaller bird than the kosor (large eagle) which is the totem of the kongkong moiety.tárgau4.1.9Kinship4.3.9.1Customanthro; kinship
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maleraalienable nounEnglishlove magicobotoilatlat4.3.9.1Customanthro
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mamaintransitive verbEnglishchew betel nutTok Pisinkaikai buaiThis refers to chewing bu (betel nut), pok (betel pepper) and kabang (powdered lime) together.bukabangpok14.3.9.1Customanthro
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Marmar2alienable nounEnglishtobuán nameIt is said that this tobuán formerly belonged to the Sahwon clan, but now belongs to the Piknat clan.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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matmatalienable nounEnglishcemeteryA cemetery area is typically surrounded by a lár (stone fence).4.3.9.1Customanthro
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maulalienable nounSurtorahin malar kándi ái rung til hiráEnglishland parcelThis refers to a parcel of land owned by an ancestor and passed on to someone living today.Á gim gim kis i torahin malar si tata di. Kuir gim kis on a ngoro maul sang si tata di.Us we live in the old village of father and them (i.e. used to belong to father and his relatives). The piece (of ground) we live on is like the parcel of land belonging to father and them.8.5Location4.3.9.1Customanthro; location
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máhluninalienable nounSurminsik kálámul a mat alariEnglishpossessions of a person who has died; estateThis includes such items as pigs, clothing, money and shell money. The custom from Sursurunga is that the children of a person who has died take his possessions and give them to their father's clan relatives. Those possessions are then divided according to the wishes of the relatives when the appropriate feast occurs. This is done publicly so that everyone can witness it.Tan putun táit si koko kápte be gim mákái kabin kápte be gim ioh bor on. Pákánbung ngo gima ioh bor on má, ki erár má gimák mákái má timlai á máhlun ái koko.The old things of uncle's we have not yet seen/acquired because we have not yet mumued pig for him (performed the mortuary feast). When we mumu pig for him, then at that time we will see and divide uncle's possessions.mahal4.3.9.1Customanthro
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mámáhatinalienable noun; alienable nounEnglishlikeness; form; picture; photoIn addition to being used to mean 'photo, picture', this term also refers to the form, likeness, or face of someone still alive which appears on a different being, like a spirit, thus the illusion that the person is in a different place than he really is. This occurrence is believed to indicate that the person will die shortly. This word can also be used as an alienable noun, as in the second example.I pákán libung erei, ái Paulo a mákái kesi mákmák, má mákmák erei a mákái a ngoromin. A mákái mámáhat kálámul til Makedoniá a sámtur i mátán táil mák lala sungi... (Apo 16.9)That night, Paul saw a vision, and that vision he saw was like this. He saw the likeness/form of a person from Macedonia standing before him and he greatly begged him...Buk minái a káng mai marán mámáhat, má marán tili di a arwat mai bos mámáhat i buk si Daniel. (Apapos, Worwor Táil)This book is filled with many pictures/images, and many from them are equal with (the same as) images in the book of Daniel.tantanián4.3.9.1Customanthro
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mánápalienable nounEnglishginger (generic term)Tok PisinkawawarnobonTypes of gingerlain marismánáp hirumánáp ur5.2Food4.3.9.1Customanthro; food
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máskunverbal nounSurlong namnam uri akiláng i kálámul ngo táitEnglishmake a feast to honour a person or eventThis word operates as a transitive verb which takes on, but it is structured like an inalienable noun. This term refers to resources expended, such as cash or shell money or food from one's garden, in order to put on a feast. The occasion can be such events as the annual thanksgiving offering or the dedication and opening of a new church, but traditionally and still today also refers to the process of giving mortuary feasts in order to inherit or acquire mahal, the possessions of the deceased. To use this term, there must be pig involved.Kalik er a ioh bor i kákán, a ngoro ákte long arwat pasi máskun i kákán, má ngorer a artálár suri na otoi mahal si kákán.That child who mumued pig for his father, it is like he has fulfilled/accomplished honouring/memoralizing his father, and therefore he is able to take possession of his father's estate.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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mát1alienable nounEnglishlineage; clan; moietyTok PisinbisnisSursurungas generally do not make a definite distinction between the use of terms like gegen, kabinhun, and mát. All are used interchangeably for any kinship group from lineage to moiety.gegenkabinhun4.1.9Kinship4.3.9.1Customanthro; kinship
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mehmehalienable nounEnglishnecklace4.3.9.1Customanthro
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midalalienable nounEnglishdecorationThis is a decoration made of an accordianed leaf attached to a stick. The leaf blows in the wind.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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milutalienable nounEnglishmossThis is used of both moss that grows on rocks and trees and moss that grows on the reef. Milut and kupkum from rotten logs is eaten together before participating in the custom of eating fire.miltun1.5Plant4.3.9.1Customanthro; tree/plant
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minatin kálámulidiomSurkálámul kápate lu hol pas te táit suri longoiEnglishperson who has not displayed any leadership qualitiesdead man/personThis describes a person who does not participate in activities that display his ability, as in speaking to local issues or giving feasts. So, should he declare himself for a leadership position in the community, people would say this about him because he has not shown any qualities of leadership previously.Kálámul ngo kápte a lu hol pas te táit suri longoi suri matananu dák mákái, ái á matngan kálámul di lu parai suri ngo a minatin kálámul.A person who does think of anything to do so that people will see it, he is the kind of person they say about him that he is a dead person (he is not a leader).tu kálámul kálámul (sár)3.5.3.1Word2Person4.3.9.1Customanthro; interesting idiom; person
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minmáirinalienable nounSurtáit di merei kálámul mai suri para atalsai ngo ái á matngan kálámul ngádáhEnglishuniform; symbols; trappings; gloryThis refers to special occasion clothing and decorations, a uniform denoting one's job, a symbol of one's position, a distinctive place, or of a house, a symbol of lifestyle or habits. As the Sursurunga definition says, something a person is decorated, or even covered, with to proclaim what kind of person he is. Traditionally, one's minmáir was composed of things like the spear one carried or the shell money one wore. In the Scriptures, minmáir_i_Káláu is God's glory or splendor.Kálámul er a mákmák ngoro tekesi tiling kálámul a ninir i ngisán. Lusán er a sol on a lite alari minmáir kán tan kálámul er di tiklik no.That man looks like some big man whose name is noised (i.e. a well-known and/or important person). That shirt he entered into (he put on) is different from the uniforms/garb of those men they are all together (those men who are with him).Má rumán osmapak a káng mai lala sauh a so tili talsán minmáir i Káláu má tili kán rakrakai,... (Apa 15.8)And the temple was fillled with much smoke that came out from the light of God's glory and from his power,...mermer4.9.7.2Christianity4.3.9.1Customanthro; lotu
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moalienable noun1Surngisán maritEnglishtree type; pandanus typeThe mo is like the naum tree. Its leaves are like the leaves of the naum, but its leaves are a bit small, and the leaves of the naum are large. They sew up the mo leaves also for (rain) coverings or for walling up a girl intitiate (i.e. make her hut with mo leaves), just like also the leaves of the bal. The (fruit) clusters of the mo are long and/but not round like the marit clusters, and it is red, and they eat it. Some here in Sursurunga boil the mo fruit to get its juice and then they mix cassava with it so it becomes red. It is not like the fruit of the marit.
marit1.5Plant4.3.9.1Customanthro; tree/plant
2Surbebeh káián kámguEnglishenclosure for a girl initiateThe leaves of the mo are used for making the shelter inside the cook house for a girl initiate, and the shelter is called by this name. The corresponding term for male initiates is papau.
bebeh6.5.1.1Househouse
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mok-oitransitive verbEnglishtaboo during mourningThis is usually done with food and smoking items because of the death of a person who used to provide those things.mokmokmokos4.3.9.1Customanthro
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mokmokintransitive verbSurkápate namnamEnglishfasting in mourningThis is done by widows and orphans when they kis_mokos (mourn).ahalkis mokosmokosmokoi4.3.9.1Customanthro
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mokos1intransitive verbEnglishwidowed2alienable nounEnglishwidow; widowerkánái mokoskis mokosmokmokmoksonmokoi2Person4.3.9.1Customanthro; person
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morsohsohmársohsohalienable nounEnglishspirit typeThis word may refer to a place where spirits live as well as the spirits associated with a particular clan or place. The kind of spirits involved include tánráu, urtarang, soi. This type of spirit may take the form of a snake, a dog, or even a palngat (vine).tesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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muk2alienable nounEnglishtaboo placekamnar4.3.9.1Customanthro
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noboninalienable nounEnglishabove-ground part of a plantTraditionally, nobon were used in sending messages to request help or request a person's presence. Nobon_mánáp (ginger) was sent to summon a person, nobon_pokori (kunai grass) was sent to ask for help with raksa (collecting grass for roofing) and iatih (roofing a house), and nobon_get (a colourful plant) was sent to ask for help with dancing.nomnobon1.5Plant4.3.9.1Customanthro; tree/plant
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ngin i polnginim polidiomEnglishmortuary feast typedrink a green coconutThis is the second in the series of three mortuary feasts, and usually takes place within a week or two of the first feast (tahtahun). Actual timing is quite flexible, depending on other events and availability of food. Pol (drinking coconut) is served as an appetizer before the main course of pig and tubers. Some pigs are divided up and distributed to the women who came at the time of death and wailed. The final feast is táptápir.
longsitpol1radas bu4.3.9.1Customanthro
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