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obotoialienable nounEnglishlove magicmaleralatlat4.3.9.1Customanthro
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opngininalienable nounSurkán pakta á bor; tintoh uri nahlán borEnglishsize; measureThis is used of measuring pigs, and is done with a string around the largest part of the pig's middle. The string is then kept in the men's house. Later, when that pig is paid back, the string is brought out to compare the second pig to the first one to ensure the two are equal.nahlán4.3.9.1Customanthro
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osmapakintransitive verbSurosoi táit a tur suri lite táitEnglishofferingTok PisinoparingThis term, used as both an intransitive verb and a noun, may be the combination of os, from osoi (burn), and mapak (true), thus an important burning.mapak2osoi4.9.7.2Christianity4.3.9.1Customanthro; lotu
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ot buhtransitive verb taking onSurkápte utngi ngisán muswan; rumrum suri utngiEnglishcall someone by a term other than his name out of respectThis is done between people who should not use each other's proper names, a way of respecting your relationship with them. One example of this is to call one's name taboo rugar (those two).Kákán ái kauh, kápte iau lu utngi ngisán kabin iau lu buh on. Iau lu ot buh on sár mai utngi ngo kákán ái kauh. Ngisán muswan a kis, mái sár ngo káp iau te lu utngi.The son's father, I do not call/speak his name because I am respectful of our relationship. I just call him respectfully the son's father. His own real name exists, but I do not call/say it.buh13.5.1Say4.3.9.1Customanthro; speak
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ototintransitive verbEnglishput a curse onsay sayThe meaning of this word ranges from a joking throw away (example below) to a serious curse put on someone secretly.Pákánbung tan kálámul di mák iau iau han suri wonwon ki dik otot namurwa iau ngoromin, "Han má, unák wonoi maumau!"When the men saw me going to fish then they cursed after me like this, "Go then, you will catch a sea snake!"ototnaotototna3.5.1Say4.3.9.1Customanthro; speak
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ototnaintransitive verbSurbin namurwai mai sápkin worEnglishcurseThis is the practice of, sometimes jokingly and sometimes seriously, calling out a curse on someone heading off to hunt or fish or even go on a trip.Nengen i nas, ái Piri a han suri wonwon. Má ngo tan kálámul di mák palai mai kán wonwon, ki dik bin namurwai ngo na wonoi urtarang. Má pákánbung a wonwon, kápte sang a won te isu, kabin di ototna namurwai mai parai ngo na wonoi urtarang.Earlier at midday, Piri went to fish. And when the men saw him going with his fishing (pole), then they called after him that he would catch an evil spirit. And when he fished, he did not catch any fish, because they cursed after him with saying that he would catch an evil spirit.otototot3.5.1Say4.3.9.1Customanthro; speak
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pakantransitive verbSuroboi ur namurEnglishput aside for laterThis term is used primarily of food, but is also appropriate for water or money. It can be used to speak of food taken from a feast to someone unable to attend.Ngo gama tulsai namnam, gama obop pala te ur amu ur namur. Má ngo gama tulus no mai má kápgamte pakan gam mam te, ki dánih má gama ani á namur?When you all divide the food, you should put-remove some for yours later. And/but if you serve it all and you do not put aside for later some for you, then what will you eat later?pakpakan4.3.9.1Customanthro
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papalalienable nounEnglishbark of a treeThis is peeled off the tree, slit to form a wrapping, and used for mumuing vegetables, or traditionally for wrapping the dead for burial.papal ololáspáplai5.2.1Food preparation4.3.9.1Customanthro; cooking
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papaualienable nounEnglishenclosure for male initiateThis refers to the temporary house where male initiates live while in the jungle. The corresponding term for a female initiate is mo.
6.5.1.1House4.3.9.1Customanthro; house
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pás kámnahidiomSursál án kip kalengnai minsikEnglishreciprocating; even things outbreak up fireThis describes a way to even out payments or obligations. One provides a pig for an event equivalent in size, shape, price and value to one previously provided by the organizers of this event. When this is paid for, they have pás_kámnah for this transaction.Tungu iau isi kesi bor i pákánbung a ioh bor ái Tomonmon i kán koko. Má inái má i kángit ioh bor, ái Tomonmon a parai ngo na is tekesi bor ur main. Na pás kámnah á erei pasi kán kesi sángul á reu a tumái kak bor mai. A nem má i kip kalengnai kán reu.Previously I tied/contributed a pig when Tomonmon mumued pig for his uncle. And now at our pig mumu, Tomonmon said he would tie/bring a pig to here. He will reciprocate then/there to get his ten shell money strings he exchanged my pig with. He wants now to get back his shell money.sámátpásang/pásngi4.3.9.1Customanthro
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pásang kilaintransitive serial verbSurlong pala kán wák ngo kán pupEnglishdivorceunhook from being marriedpásang/pásngi4.1.9Kinship4.3.9.1Customanthro; kinship
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pidik1alienable nounSurtáit kápate mánán sara on i matananuEnglishsecretTraditionally, secrets were revealed during male initiation in the rumán_pidik (house for secrets). The word pidik seems to cover the range of meaning from spirit-related secrets to ordinary secrets, i.e. just something you don't want others to know.pinpidik4.3.9.1Customanthro
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pirán tabaltabalalienable nounEnglishmoney; coingrain of moneyThis term is used of modern money, coins or notes, in contrast to reu (traditional shell money).pitkalangmanireu4.3.9.1Customanthro
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pok1alienable nounEnglishbetel pepperTok Pisindakamama4.3.9.1Customanthro
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pok2alienable nounEnglishtableA pok is a high table used for distributing food at a mumu or for storing raw vegetables. Generally the surface is betel nut bark or split and flattened bamboo. A pok_kán_kámgu (table for a girl initiate) is built for distributing food at a kámgu (girl initiate) feast, and is distinguished by being divided into sections along the top using short lengths of bamboo or wood, each section assigned for distributing to one particular woman the payback food she gave to the kámgu during her confinement.suapok4.3.9.1Customanthro
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pok-oi1transitive verbSurhul pasiEnglishbuyThis term is used primarily of purchasing a pig. Some use it for a tradition involving a newly married couple. For a new house into which a bride has not entered, the groom will give a small feast and huli (buy) part of the house. This allows his bride and female relatives to enter the house. This is called pokoi_rum or huli_rum (buying the house). Older people may use this term to mean bribery, as in paying someone to look the other way or do something illegal.Gengen bor muda si wowo iakte pokoi ur si lik. Iau hol suri hul aratintin ur namur, má ngorer iak hul pasi suri gimák támri má nák pakta ur namur.That small pig back there of grandmother's I have purchased for my daughter. I'm thinking about paying for her schooling later, and so I bought it so we could feed it and it would grow for later (when we sell it).huli; sahi4.3.9.1Customanthro
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pokomautransitive verbEnglishmarryThis is the action of marrying two people to each other, so causing them to be kila (married) or become diar_mokson (they two who are a married couple).akila4.1Relationships4.1.9Kinship4.3.9.1Customanthro; kinship; relationship
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pukpuksa soialienable nounSurpukpuksa til hirá káián rang kámpup i gitEnglishstory; myth; legendThis term implies myth-like stories passed down through the generations. Examples of these would be the stories about the wallaby and his antics with humans and with other animals or stories about the interaction of spirits with mankind.soi14.3.9.1Customanthro
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pukpuksa torapukpuksa sitalienable nounSurarabitbit til hirá; pukpuksa táit til hiráEnglishhistorical story; teaching; saying; mythThis term implies the passing on of knowledge about historical events. Examples of this include the origins of clans or the events of World War 2. These, like the pukpuksa_soi, are passed on through the generations, but information may be added or updated in the telling.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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pulpultumEnglishgame typeIn this game, one person or group tries to give more of something to the other person or group than they can respond with or give back. The groups are determined by moiety. This is done with seeds, grass stalks, or other things close to hand.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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pupun sit pas-iidiomSurkip pasi si pupunEnglishinherit from one's grandfathergrandfather thing getThis includes inheriting not only tangible things, but also a person's ways, practices, traits. It also includes inheriting the consequences of another's actions, the effects of what the ancestors did, both good or bad.pupungsit1kákán sit pasi; pasi14.3.9.1Customanthro
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radas buratis buphraseSurtari bu si rung erei di is borEnglishgiving betel nutRadas_bu is the custom of acknowledging the provision of a pig at a nginim_pol feast (type of mortuary feast). A branch of betel nut and a shelled drinking coconut is given to people not in the hosting clan who have provided a pig for the feast. Actual monetary payment is made at a later time.nginim pol4.3.9.1Customanthro
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reualienable nounEnglishshell money (generic term)This is the generic term for traditional shell money in contrast to pirán_tabal (modern coins and notes). Reu is also used of things made from shell money like necklaces and bracelets. Today reu is used in brideprice transactions and pig exchanges as well as for display at the time a kámgu (girl initiate) is presented.manipirán tabalTypes of shell moneykalolon2lolát4.3.9.1Customanthro
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rohon sáksáklangwán sáksákalienable nounEnglishevil flying insectflyer bad/evilThis is described as a worm-like creature that develops into an insect with wings. It comes from inside a person, exiting through a sore. Once this creature has left the body, the person dies.E ngo kálámul di tarwa sáksák ur on má ák hut i kumer i kálámul er má kumer er ák mon i bábán, ki di lu parai ngo rohon sáksák. Má ngo rohon sáksák er a roh pas tili kálámul er di tarwa sáksák ur on, ki ák lu mat má kálámul er.If a person has had evil/sorcery sent to him and a worm comes to that man and that worm has wings, then they say/call it an evil flying insect. And when that evil flying insect jumps out from that person they sent sorcery to him, then that person dies.langwán sáksákrohon bát2.5.1Sick1.6.1.7Insect4.3.9.1Customanthro; insect; sickness
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rurutintransitive verbSurruru hutEnglishsearch for liceThis is the action of searching for and pulling lice out of another's hair, and seems to be a shortened form of ruru_hut (search for lice).sisir24.3.9.1Customanthro
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