Search results for "Custom"

sagul manmanirintransitive serial verbSurkálámul a mat táilnai kán pákánbungEnglishdie earlygrab warmingThis implies sudden and unexpected death, not previously sick or in pain, and of a person who is not yet old, implying there is someone else causing his death.Ngo kalik kaukak kápte be kán pákánbung suri ngo na mat, mái sár ngo te di wahi mák mat. Matngan minat di lu parai suri ngo sagul manmanir, kabin kalik kaukak minái kápte be kán pákánbung suri ngo na mat.When (there is) a young man it is not yet his time to die, however some sorcerize him and he dies. That kind of death they say about it is sagul_manmanir, because this young man it is not yet his time to die.matmat biamat káiánsagul/sanglái2.5.1Sick4.3.9.1Customanthro; sickness
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sah pala-itransitive serial verbSurhul palaiEnglishpay offbuy removeThis is used of giving money to one's wife as a means of divorcing her, literally paying her off and sending her away. It is also used of removing shame.Nabung kálámul erei a longoi kesi lala long namnam suri ák hul pala kán wák. A sah pala kán wák mai K1000 mák ru i reu. A sah pala kán wák ngorer suri náng kila pasi kesi hutngin wák bul.Yesterday that man made a very big meal/feast to buy off his wife. He paid off his wife with K1000 and two lengths of shell money. He paid off his wife like that so he could marry another new wife.sahi4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sah-itransitive verbSuranokwai sápkin mai piran; bánáiEnglishbuyIn addition to using this term of paying a fine for a wrong committed, this may also refer to buying pigs at a feast.Kálámul er a bop mai wák mudi a kila, ki nabung má ák hul anokwai kán sápkin mai kesi bor má K500. Pákánbung tan kometi di nagogon on, ki dik parai singin ngo na sahi kán rong mai bor má pirán tabal a ngorer ákte longoi sang.That man slept with that woman up there who is married, so yesterday he bought-straightened (paid a fine for) his sin with one pig and K500. When the headmen put the law/judgment on him, they said to him that he should buy off his wrong with the pig and money like what he has done.huli; pokoi1; poram/pormisah palai4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sak otoitransitive serial verbSurarwat suri top onEnglishable to acquire; able to possesspull inheritThis term is used used in questions and in the context of seeing whether or not the child of a person who has died is able to fulfill the duties of feasts to be worthy of inheriting his father's wealth.Er má ák mat ái kákán á kalik er. Gita mákái má ngo arwat sang suri na top on á tan táit si kákán e ngo kápnate long te máskun ái kákán. Ki ngádáh, na sak otoi sang á mahal si kákán ngo kápte?Just now that child's father died. We will see now if it will be possible that he will take the things of his father if he will not do his father's honour feasts/memoralizing (i.e. if he will be able to do the feasts or not). So what, will he be able to acquire the inheritance of his father or not?otoi1saki14.3.9.1Customanthro
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sangsangmatalienable nounEnglishspirit typeThis is feminine spirit able to inhabit another's body, causing sickness and death. It is a kind of turngan (spirit, god).tesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sausau asiridiomSurmulán artabar uri narsán asir a hutEnglishrefreshing a guest; being hospitableguest cookingThis is the idea of feeding and caring immediately for a visitor, and would include such actions as climbing for drinking coconuts to offer a drink, going for betel nut, conversation. It also includes the action of preparing a meal for the visitor even though it may not yet be the normal time for cooking.Tatalen til Sursurunga ngo asir a hut i narsán tekesi kálámul, ki da mulán támri be mai bu má pol. Ma namur da támri má mai namnam muswan ngorer i balbal. Tatalen ngoromin di lu parai ngo di sausau asir mai bu má pol.The custom from Sursurunga when a guest/visitor arrives at some person, then they will first feed him then with betel nut and drinking coconut. And later they will feed him with real food like root vegetables. This custom they say that they are cooking (for a) guest (refreshing a guest, being hospitable) with betel nut and drinking coconut.sau/sawi5.2.1Food preparation4.3.9.1Customanthro; cooking
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sawatalienable nounEnglishmourning necklaceThis is a necklace made from braiding strips of black cloth. It is worn by certain relatives of a deceased person during the period of mourning.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sáksák1intransitive verbEnglishwrong; worst; evil; badTili kes sár á kepwen ngus a lu so i parpara agas má ák lu so i worwor sáksák mul. Rang buhang, koion sang na ngorer! (Iak 3.10)From just one single mouth comes out praise and evil talk also comes out. My clansmen, it should definitely not be like that!hol sáksák ur onhom sáksákhom sáksák maikanih sáksákkám sáksákkis sáksákmátsáksákmihmih sáksákrohon sáksáksáksáksákánworwor sáksákasáksáknai; sáksáknai2modifierEnglishextreme; excessiveKesi pupunkak anang i malar, ngisán ái Soleng, a kaukak be i pákánbung a hut i lotu i bet 1875. Má i bet 1975 i pákánbung di longoi lotu án pátpát mátán lotu a tapam hut, pupunkak minái ákte lala pupunkak sáksák sang má.One old man down in the village, his name was Soleng, he was a young man when the church arrived in the year 1875. And in the year 1975 when they did a service to celebrate the church arriving, this old man had become an extremely old man indeed.3alienable nounSursápkin taniánEnglishevil spiritThis is used of a place inhabited by an evil spirit harmful to people, and of someone inhabited by an evil spirit.Kálámul erei, tan kám sáksák di tarwai tanián sáksák ur on pasi ák tu manmanu i páplun. A latlat on i tám latlat mák mákái ngo di tarwa sáksák ur on.That man, those with evil ancestral power sent an evil spirit on to him resulting in his body developed sores. The local healer (tried to) heal him and saw that they sent an evil spirit on to him.tesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sámátintransitive verbSurlongoi suri kip kaleng onEnglishrecoup; reciprocateTungu i nginim pol sur koko, ái Tobunbun a isi kesi bor mák mur i iau mai. A longoi ngorer suri kip kalengnai kán piran tabal er a tumái kak bor mai er iau isi i pákánbung a nginim pol sur mámán. Bor erei a ngoro a sámát pasi kán pirán tabal mai. A isi suri inak tumái ur singin.Previously at the coconut drinking (feast) for my uncle, Tobunbun tied a pig and followed me with it (brought it or helped me by contributing it). He did like that to get back his money that he exchanged for my pig that I tied when he did the drinking coconut (feast) for his mother. That pig is like he recouped his money with it. He tied/contributed it so I would exchange/pay to him.pás kámnahtumái4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sikwáninalienable nounSurkáplabin; wánEnglishresult; reason; consequenceEr ák tu lu bal sasam á kalik erei a káplabin i ngákngák si mámán. Ái mámán kápate lu taram suri mur i tan táit di lu parai ngo matananu da longoi, má sikwán má erei ák sami á kán kalik.That/when that child is just repeatedly sick it's because of the rebellion of his mother. His mother does not obey concerning following the things they say that people should do, and its result/consequence now is that her child is sick.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sirmátalienable nounEnglishspirit typeA sirmát is a feminine spirit who marries human men and provides wealth for them in secret. She is able to read minds, has her own reu (shelll money), and doesn't reveal herself unless her husband is alone with her. If her husband tells anyone that she is a sirmát and not a woman, then the sirmát won't come again. This is a kind of turngan (spirit, god).tesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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siusiu kán kalikidiomEnglishfeast for newborn babybaby's bathingThis is celebrated to commemorate washing the blood off a newborn baby. This is a kind of gomgom (feast). People come with gifts for the newborn, much like an American baby shower. Food is provided by the baby's relatives.longsit3.5.3.1Word4.3.9.1Customanthro; interesting idiom
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so balitransitive serial verbSurkápte mángátEnglishdisagree angrily; protestplant againThis is a protest involving the actual planting of a second stalk, usually get, beside a first one. The first stalk is to signify that an error was made in performing a custom, as in an urtarang (evil spirit) being improperly presented. The second stalk is to say that things were in fact done correctly, so a protest against the first stalk. The term for this custom is also used idiomatically of any protest.E ngo káláu a mák tekesi táit a hol on ngo kápate kuluk, ki ák parai singin kán wák. Má ái kán wák ák so bali kán wor mai mos kabin a hol on ngo táit er a wor suri ái kán pup a kuluk sár.If a male/man sees something he thinks is not good, then he says it to his woman/wife. And his wife protests/disagrees (in) her talk with anger because she thinks that that thing her husband spoke about is just good/fine.kos worbali1; soi33.5.1Say4.3.9.1Customanthro; speak
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soaalienable nounEnglishplatformThis platform is carried from one village to another with a live pig and uncooked root vegetables on it. A man sits on top of the pig and he dances while other men accompany him singing. This food is delivered for a feast.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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soa limidiomSurtari táit uri artanganEnglishgive something to help another person or cause; reach out to help anotherstick out one's handThis is used of a formal offering to the church, but is also appropriate in referring to one person directly helping another with a need he has.I bohboh bet no matananu án lotu tili United Church di lápka pirán tabal ur káián lotu. A ngoro matananu no di lu soa lim suri tángni lotu.Every year the church people from the United Church throw/donate money for the church. It is like all the people stick out their hands (give) to help the church.artabarlimangsoai4.3.9.1Customanthro
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soi1alienable nounEnglishstoryTok Pisinsitoripukpuksa soi3.5.1Say4.3.9.1Customanthro; speak
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soi2alienable nounEnglishspirit typeThis is not the spirit of a dead man, but a spirit who has his own place, as a cave or the base of a tree. This is a male spirit, small but with long arms and legs enabling him to reach the tops of trees and to kick things long distances. This type of spirit is malevolent.tesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sokopanaalienable nounEnglishevil spirit typeThis is a fairly generic term with each different type having a specific name such as talung_rokoi (wild spirit) or talung_a_sal (flowing spirit). A sokopana cries at the mátán_bang (men's house door/front), especially when an ainpidik (spirit expert) dies.tesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sokta-i2transitive verbSurkeles kalengnaiEnglishreplace; repayGengen bor er di tari di sokta iau mai kabin iau isi kesi bor tungu má ngorer di kosoi kak artangan i pákánbung di ioh bor.That small (living) pig they gave, they repaid me with it because I tied/provided a pig previously and therefore they answered/compensated my gift when they did a pig mumu.arsokta24.3.9.1Customanthro
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sotwánsit (?)intransitive verbEnglishsorcerize (?); payback (?)This may be to sorcerize a sorcerer or pay him back for doing black magic.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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suapokalienable nounEnglishtableThis is a storage table built at the side of one's cook house for storing uncooked food until needed; typically, unsplit whole lengths of bamboo or wood are used for the surface.pok24.3.9.1Customanthro
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Suilikalienable nounEnglishcharacter from Sursurunga legendsThis name comes from a Sursurunga legend and is associated with some of the same roles as Jesus.Tamagulahikabatarai4.3.9.1Customanthro
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suisuialienable nounEnglishorphan4.1.9Kinship4.3.9.1Customanthro; kinship
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sulektransitive verb taking onSursisdoi; pupukEnglishmotivateThis describes a motivation people have to display their wealth or ability to put on an event, such as a mortuary feast.Ngo kálámul a longoi lala namnam, ki di lu parai ngo a sulek on i kán tan minsik. A sálán ngo a sisdoi i kán minsik er ák longoi lala namnam ngorer.When a man makes a large feast, then they say that his possessions are motivating him. Its meaning is that those possessions of his are pushing him he has made a large feast like that.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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sum2intransitive verbEnglishrestricted; tabooed; mourningThis is imposed on things previously provided by someone who has died as part of kis_mokos (widowhood customs).4.3.9.1Customanthro
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