Search results for "Custom"

tám angagur án naul bimalienable nounSurtám latlat a lu mákái táit i libung ngorer i mihmih ngo mákmákEnglishhealerliar of earthThis implies not seeing God's revelation, but rather seeing what comes from earth instead, so a local healer that relies on something other than God's help.naul bimtám12.5.7.2Medicine2Person4.3.9.1Customanthro; medicine; person
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tám dahilalienable nounEnglishmagicianone who knows white magictám latlatkám sáksákmátsáksáktám wahtám12Person4.3.9.1Customanthro; person
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tám dákalienable nounEnglishspirit typeone who uses torchesThis is a spirit being who emanates light from his armpits. He is the subject of a well-known Sursurunga legend.dák2tám1tesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tám latlatalienable nounEnglishhealer; shamanone who does white magictám dahilkám sáksákmátsáksáktám wahtám12Person4.3.9.1Customanthro; person
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tám wahalienable nounEnglishsorcererone who does bad magicThis term refers to a sorcerer who learns his skills from another, contrasting with kám_sáksák who comes by ancestral or evil power naturally by inheriting it.kám sáksákmátsáksáktám dahiltám latlattám1wah12Person4.3.9.1Customanthro; person
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támin1intransitive verb and modifierEnglishtrue; faithful; reliable; importantTok PisinturuUse of this word is an appropriate comment when turning to a new point in a discourse.A támin ngo git no a ngorer sang i kángit liu á tungu. Git lu long artálár pasi ninsin kápán páplun, ngorer git murmur i nemnem káián kángit holhol má káián kápán páplun i git. (Epe 2.3)It is true that all of us were just like that in our lives previously. We accomplished/fulfilled the character/ways of the body/flesh, as in we followed the desire of our thinking and our bodies.Auh, kut aririu kápate támin táit uri narsán ái Káláu. Tukes sár á táit a támin uri narsán, má a ngoromin. A tirwai bál kálámul suri na mákái ngo a ruruna tus i Karisito pasi ák mon i kán armámna narsán matananu. (Gal 5.6)No, circumcision is not a true/important thing to God. Only one thing is important to him, and it is like this. He examines a person's stomach to see if he accurately believes in Christ resulting in there is his love for people.muswan2inalienable nounEnglishinsides; core; meat; substance; essence; contentsThis can be the insides or substance of a tree, a coconut, a water container, a basket and many other things. It can refer to a person as well, for example támin_i_iau (my bones and flesh, the purely physical parts of my body).Ái Tomal a lala ser suri kán kesi kina i polgon kán rat má kápte a ser pasi. A urai á támin á kán rat má kápte sang a ser pasi. A marán pákán sang a tiri á kán rat má kápte sang a mák pasi.Tomal was greatly searching for his one kina inside his basket and he did not find it. He emptied out the contents of his basket and he still did not find it. Very many times he emptied his basket and he did not see it.kalolon1kalwosonkolmairlengwen2.1Bodybody part human3alienable nounEnglishancestor; truthmokdonrang támintám2támin muswan4.9.7.2Christianity4.1.9Kinship4.3.9.1Customanthro; kinship; lotu
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tánráu1alienable nounEnglishspirit type or place; taboo place; clan spiritTok Pisinpeles tambuThisi is a generic term referring to a god or spirit associated with a place or with a particular clan. It is prayed to for help, goods, and protection. Some have used this term as a reference to God. The power of a tánráu is called sikwán (evil power). Under the generic tánráu there are three classes of spirits: (1) turngan (including sangsangmat, sirmát, soi), (2) urtarang (including tesit, kinitsuil), and (3) morsohsoh.
Tám Pulpulus Tánráutesit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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táptápiralienable nounEnglishmortuary feast typeThis is the final feast to honour a person who has died, the third in the sequence of mortuary feasts. Bananas are eaten as well as pork and tubers. This may occur several months or several years after the death. The other two feasts are tahtahun and ngin_i_pol.
longsit4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tárgaualienable nounSurkesá matngan manEnglishbird type; White-breasted Sea EagleThe tárgau is smaller than the kosor (large eagle), and its size is the same as the kalamlam (hawk). The tárgau has black feathers and they are a little light in colour. It sits on a tree branch and waits for fish to snatch with its claws for its food. And its only food is fish. It makes its nest in the branches of large trees just like the kosor does. Here in Sursurunga there are two moieties, kongkong and malai. The tárgau is the bird belonging to the malai.
Malai1.6.1.2Bird4.3.9.1Customanthro; bird
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tárgun minatalienable nounSurpokon di tahni kálámul onEnglishgravedeath's holeThis term is used primarily to refer to the grave of a particular person rather than being used in a generic sense.bimunioiohuntarang án minat8.5Location4.3.9.1Customanthro; location
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táu kulukintransitive serial verbSurkápate kila ger; kápte a iomEnglishmarry properlyrun away wellThis refers to following the moiety system for marriage, a person of one moiety marrying a person from the other moiety, so not marrying within the same moiety or clan.iom3.5.3.1Word4.1.9Kinship4.3.9.1Customanthro; interesting idiom; kinship
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tengtengalienable nounEnglishheadbandlul tengteng4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tesitalienable nounEnglishspirit typeThis word is sometimes used as a generic term, and is spoken of as something recognized as a spirit but not recognized or distinguished as to kind. However, this term does not include angels as they are distinguished as a separate class. This is a kind of urtarang (evil spirit).Types of spiritsbulaukinitsuilkulahikulahinkulahinmorsohsohsangsangmatsáksáksirmátsoi2sokopanataniántaniangtanián armongohtanián hirutám dáktánráu1turnganurtarang4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tiltransitive verb taking on1EnglishfromThis typically occurs preceding locative relaters and direction words (short or long forms). Sursurungas prefer to write this combination as a single word. Til may also be suffixed with -i (relater) preceding a verb or noun. It can even serve as a verb on its own.Má namur iau mákái kesi angelo mul a hut tilamunang i mátán taubar má a top i táit án akiláng uri akiláng i kán matananu ái Káláu koner a liu áklis. (Apa 7.2)And then I saw another angel he came/arrived from down at the eye of the east wind (from the east) and he held a mark/seal for marking the people of God that one who lives forever.Mái Iesu a bali worwor má a parai singing ngo, "...Á iau iau sumlahin ái Dewit má iau tili kán mát sang, má á iau á mátál án arasa." (Apa 22.16)And Jesus spoke again and he said to me that, "...Me I am David's descendant and I am from his own clan, and I am the morning star."ur17.2Movemotion2Englishsame clanThis usage of til indicates that one person is the same clan as another, but without being specific as to who preceded or is more important. The phrase Karisito_tili_Káláu (Christ is from God) means that Christ and God are bound up with each other, have something in common, are from the same group or source.4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tinán kámwákalienable nounEnglishinstrument typeThis instrument is used to simulate the crying of an urtarang (evil spirit).4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tinkasalienable noun1Englishhole; pitThis is a large and very deep natural hole in the ground which traditionally would have been used for throwing human bodies into.tarang2Englishgate to a men's house1.7Nature, environment4.3.9.1Customanthro; nature
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ting turnganphraseSurbin ur singin turngan; kilkilai turngan ur onEnglishcursepower-splitKán sasam ái koner er a mat mai, di parai ngo tekes a bin ur singin turngan ngo na kis on. Má ngorer marán di ruruna ngo di ting turngan ur on má ngorer ák mat.The sickness of that one that he died with/from, they said that someone called to a power that it would sit/be on him. And therefore many believed that they cursed him and so he died.ting/tigi4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tipalienable noun1Englishmark; full stop; dotThis is occasionally used idiomatically to mean 'sentence' (i.e. talk that finishes with a full stop) since Sursurunga has become a written language.sotiptip i mansintiptiptipuntip2EnglishfingerprintA fingerprint, made by an urtarang (evil spirit), when seen at a cave along the beach signifies someone will soon die but doesn't specify who. The urtarang sings a special song called gárán_tip (fingerprint song) while he does this.2.1Body4.3.9.1Customanthro; body part human
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tiri3alienable nounEnglishinsect type; leech; bloodsuckerThis term is also the name of Tám_Nginim_Suir_Bor (the pig juice drinker), the character of a well-known Sursurunga story.bunái1.6.1.7Insect4.3.9.1Customanthro; insect
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tomonoEnglishcrazy; funny in the headThis is a joke word, taken from the traditional story about a man named Tomono who sent his own domesticated pigs out to weed his garden, then, in frustration because they dug everything up and ate it, killed the pigs and gave a feast for his friends, thus leaving himself with no garden food and no pigs.longlong tomono4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tongtongosalienable nounEnglishnestThis is a wasp nest said to be made from mud by the spirit of a dead person for his dwelling.1.6.1.7Insect4.3.9.1Customanthro; insect
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tum-áitransitive verbSurhuliEnglishexchange; payThis is used of paying cash or shell money for a pig for a mortuary feast, in contrast to bánái which is used of paying back with another pig. It is done in public. This connotes that the transaction is completed and everyone is satisfied. However, one can recoup the money paid by contributing a similar pig at a feast given by the one who received the money. That person is then obligated to respond with an equal amount in exchange for the pig brought to his feast. This term is also used of brideprice, and tumái_wák (pay for a woman) implies all the payment is complete.sámáttumtum4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tumtumintransitive verbSuranokwai mátán bor di isi uri longsit; huli wákEnglishpayingThis can refer to the process of paying for several pigs in turn provided for a feast. It can also refer to brideprice.tuntun1tumái4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tumtumwaalienable nounEnglishsorcery typeThis type of sorcery is done to pigs or people out of jealousy when another's garden is producing well or his pigs are developing well. Pigs might be sent off to become wild.wah1tumwai4.3.9.1Customanthro
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tumwa kalengna-itransitive serial verbSurkálámul a long sáksáknai kán nemnem sang kabin kápte a han suri an te namnamEnglishharm onselfsorcerize oneselfThis describes a person who wants to attend a meal, but for some reason does not. Thus, he harms himself by not fulfilling his desire for food because he does not attend the meal.Pákánbung iau bana Pita, ki iak parai singin ngo, "Namnam er gim eran on sur iáu kápate hom, a lala marán sang má tan lalain namnam masik sang. Kápte iáu han suri long namnam minái, a ngoro u tumwa kalengna iáu sang."When I met up with Pita, then I said to him that, "That food we prepared for you was not play (it was not just a little), it was a great deal indeed and only very excellent food. You did not go for this meal (even though you wanted to), it is like you sorcerized yourself (you harmed yourself by not attending the meal)."tumwai4.3.9.1Customanthro
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