Search results for "Clothing"

abade 1comm. a triangle of cloth used as shawl; anything used as a shawl. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to wear a shawl. Mun-abade ka ta adi matuningan nan odog mu. Wear a shawl so that your back will not become cold. muN‑/nuN‑. Sim: awako. (sem. domains: 5.3.7 - Wear clothing.)

abol 1comm. the native loom-woven skirt. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2weave. 2.1intrans. to weave on a hand loom. Mun-abol hi apu. Grandmother is weaving/weaves. muN‑/nuN‑. (sem. domains: 6.6.1.4 - Weaving cloth.) 2.2trans. to weave a particular product on a loom. Nganney iabol mu ad uwani? What will you weave with now? (referring to the thread which is to be used) Wano nan in-abol ku ad nakugab. A loincloth is what I wove yesterday. An maphod di pun-abol nah ampuyo? Does she weave skirts well? i‑/iN‑, puN‑. Class 3C Move, combine or attach object. (sem. domains: 6.6.1 - Working with cloth.) 2.3trans. to weave with a site-object cross-referenced by affix. Abolan dakah ampuyo. I will weave a skirt for you. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an.

almador 1comm. white, sleeveless, native blouse. Nan almador di usalom hantuh manayo kayu. Use your native blouse when you dance. Sim: lamma; Gen: gamgam. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear the native blouse. Mun-almador ka tedeyan maka-atung. Wear the native blouse because it is very hot. muN‑/nuN‑.

ampuyo 1comm. a native loom woven skirt. [Generally considered to be the type of skirt worn by the kadangyan ‘aristocratic’ class of women.] Antikkey ampuyo na. Her skirt is short. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, inabol, intinlu, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. donning the skirt 2.1deriv V. to wear the native, loom-woven skirt. Ya pinhod ot Mayor an dakol day binabain mun-ampuyo. What the Mayor wanted was that women would dress in the Ifugao skirt. muN‑/nuN‑. (sem. domains: 5.3.7 - Wear clothing.) 2.2deriv V. to dress someone in the native skirt. Ampuyowan yuh tulang yu. Dress your sister in the Ifugao skirt. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an.

apatut 1comm. may refer to any footwear except for thong-type slippers; shoes. Waday tendaan di bulwati, apatut, makan, kaiw ya gumok. There are stores for clothes, shoes, food, lumber and hardware. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear shoes. Mun-apatut ka ke. You wear shoes. muN‑/nuN‑. 3trans. to wear a particular pair of shoes. An inapatut nan apatut ku? Did you wear my shoes? ‑on/‑in‑. (sem. domains: 5.3.7 - Wear clothing.)

ay-aya sta. to be appropriate, refers to clothes that fit just right in size, length, appearance. Naka-ay-ayay ampuyon Bugan. Bugan’s skirt was just right for her. {literary} na‑. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

balikit (sp. var. balikis) 1comm. belt; waist band. Kumihang di balikit na te kimmuug. His belt is loose because he became thin. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to use belt around the waist Mumbalikit ka ta adi mag-a nan pantalon mu. You use your belt so your pants will not fall. muN‑/nuN‑. 3trans. to belt the waist area. Balikitam nan gitang mu te ongal di bulwatim. Belt your waist because your dress is too big. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an. Language Of Borrowing: Ilocano: balikis. id. kimmihang di balikit ku

balko 1comm. belt, may refer to anything which cinches the waist of a woman; may also refer to the traditional woven belt. Nan balkon inam di usalom. Use your mother's native decorative belt. Gen: gamgam. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear belt. Mumbalko ka ta adi mag-a nan ampuyom. You use your woven belt so that your skirt will not fall off. Balkowan yu nadan ampuyo yu. Wear the native decorative belt with your skirts. muN‑/nuN‑, ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, i‑/iN‑. Spec: mayad.

baningal 1comm. something placed around the shoulders. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to place a shawl or blanket around shoulders and neck.

bay-un 1comm. a basket; woven out of plastic strips or buri leaves; a sack of cloth. Alam nan bay-un an natalwan hi littuku ta ie tad da-ul. Get the basket full of rattan fruit so we will bring it down. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to place something in a basket or bag. Ibay-un mu nan ginattang inam. Place in a basket the things your mother bought. i‑/iN‑. 3intrans. to use a basket. Mumbay-un ka hin ume kah payo. Use the woven basket if you go to the field. muN‑/nuN‑. Language Of Borrowing: Ilocano.

belo 1comm. cloth used to cover the head and sometimes the face. Dehdi nan belok nah daulon di kama. My veil is under the bed. Himpappangey ang-ang nan belok nah letlatu. My veil in the picture looks awful. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear a veil. Adi mo uggan banhon tulang ku nan belok te adi mo mumbeloy tatagud uwani. My sister no longer borrows my veil because people nowadays do not wear veils. muN‑/nuN‑. Language Of Borrowing: Spanish.

binuhlan 1comm. a loincloth woven with special designs. [The loincloth was formerly worn by all males; now worn only for ceremonial occasions, particularly by those performing native dances.] Sim: tinonwe; gen: wano. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to don a loincloth; to wear a loincloth. Numbinuhlan nan kat-agu. The young man is wearing a loincloth. muN‑/nuN‑.

bolsa (sp. var. bulsa) 1comm. garment pocket. Inhaad na nan pihhuh bolsa na. He placed the money in his pocket. Maid di bolsan nan pantalona. His pants have no pockets. Sim: kabuyyan. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to place something in a garment pocket. Ibolsam nan libbutan ku. Put my betelnut bag in your pocket. Mumbolsa kah kindi ta waday kanom. Put some candies in your pocket so you will have something to eat. i‑/iN‑, muN‑/nuN‑. 3A Move and position object at site. (sem. domains: 7.3.2.6 - Put in.) Language Of Borrowing: Spanish. infl. pabolsaan

bulwati (sp. var. balwati) 1comm. any clothing worn by men or women. Dakol di bulwati an igattang da. They have many clothes to sell. Gattangom nan bulwati ta ahim ibulwati nah pangayan taku. You buy that dress so that you will wear it to where we will be going. Sim: lubung; spec: suweter, kamahhita. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear clothing. Mumbulwati ka tedeyan kotol. Get dressed because it is cold. Ibulwati yu nan ginattang ina na. Put on the dress her mother bought. Maid di ibulwatik. I have nothing to wear. Nabulwatiyan nan unga. The child is clothed. Nakabbulwati kad uwani. You are so dressed-up today. muN‑/nuN‑, i‑/iN‑, ma‑ ‑an/na‑ ‑an, naka‑ C. 3trans. to put clothing on someone. Bulwatiyam nan golang. Get the baby dressed. Duway hongwon, ohay udukon. (bulwati) Two passages for the hands, one for the body. (dress) (riddle) ‑an.

butas 1comm. boots, rubber or leather. Alam nan butas te pitok nan dalan. Get those boots because the way is muddy. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear boots. Mumbutas ka tedeyan pitoppitok di dalan. Wear the rubber boots because the road is very muddy. muN‑, ‑an. Language Of Borrowing: Tagalog.

dinabol comm. a type of woman’s skirt; another name for the gamit skirt. Sim: gam’it, inabol, ampuyo, intinlu, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

eplon 1comm. apron. Mun-ula ka keh duyu ya usalom nan eplon. If you wash the plates use the apron. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear an apron. Mun-eplon ka hin hana-ang ka. Wear an apron if you are going to cook. muN‑/nuN‑. Language Of Borrowing: English.

gam’it 1comm. a native loom-woven skirt, red and black striped. [One type of woven skirt worn by women of wealth.] Hay iusal nadan mumpalaya an pepensiyonados ya gamit. The old folks who are receiving pensions will have a parade and will wear gamit-skirts. Sim: dinabol, inabol, ampuyo, intinlu, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to wear the native skirt. Munggamit da nadan manayon u-unga. The children who will dance the native dance will wear the gamit-skirt. muN‑/nuN‑.

ginaletget comm. a native loom-woven skirt. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, inabol, ampuyo, intinlu, ginalit. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

ginalit comm. a native loom-woven skirt. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, inabol, ampuyo, intinlu, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

gupu comm. worn-out loin cloth; partly torn or threadbare. Gupu kattog di wanona. His loin cloth was very old and worn out. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

hape comm. a woven blanket with a white middle. Hape nan in-ulon apu. The blanket used by grandfather is a hape. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

hikottan comm. a belt for a bolo sheath. Nalagga nan hikottana. His belt is of woven rattan. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

hinangngal (der. of hangngal) comm. the panels of a native skirt. In-ampuyona nan hinangngal. She used the paneled-skirt. ‑on/‑in‑. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

holdak 1comm. inserted designs on clothing. Makaphod di holdak nan ampuyom. The inserted designs in your skirt are nice. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to insert something into another thing or place between other things. Holdakan yuh kanta nan drama. Insert some songs in the drama. (between acts) Holdakam hi maingit nan ulo. Insert some red designs in the blanket. Iholdak muy ngadan ku nah listaan. Insert my name on the list. Holdakam hi banniya nan bulwatik. Insert a forest lizard design on my dress. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, i‑/iN‑. 3A Move and position object at site. (sem. domains: 7.5.9 - Put.) 3trans. to partition a room or space; to divide into smaller rooms; to place a divider. Holdakom tun kuwartu tedeyan ambiambilog. Insert a divider in this room because it’s very spacious. ‑on/‑in‑. (sem. domains: 7.3.2 - Move something in a direction.)

hukyung 1comm. veil; any covering for head or any piece of hat resembling a veil. Maingit di hukyung na. Her head-cover is red. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to cover head, usually for protection. Ihukyung mu tun tuwalya. Use this towel to cover your head. Hukyungam nan golang te munhipuk. Put a cover on the baby’s head because it’s drizzling. Munhukyung ka te potang. Cover your head because it’s hot. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, i‑/iN‑, muN‑/nuN‑. id. pinhod ku nan nunhukyung nah pikdol

hulme comm. the tassel of a woman’s belt. Iphod muy hulme na. You fix the tassle of her belt. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

inabol comm. a native loom-woven skirt. Maphod nan inabol Matima. The skirt of Matima looks nice. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, ampuyo, intinlu, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

intinlu comm. a native loom-woven skirt; 3-piece skirt joined by black and red thread, one weave cut into three and sewn to make one. [This skirt is generally worn by the poor. ] Gimmatang hi intinlu te uggena inilan mun-abol. She bought a intinlu-skirt because she doesn’t know how to weave. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, inabol, ampuyo, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) (Lourdes S. Dulawan: Ifugao Culture and History)

inggalgaletget comm. a loom-woven skirt made from excess thread; worn by the poor. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) (Lourdes S. Dulawan: Ifugao Culture and History)

iskert 1comm. skirt. Atikke nan iskirt na. Her skirt is short. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear a skirt. Mun-iskert ka te deyan maka-atung. Wear a skirt because it is very hot. Iskertan yu nan imbabale yu. Have your child wear a skirt. muN‑/nuN‑. Language Of Borrowing: English: skirt.

kamahhita (sp. var. kamihhita) 1comm. undershirt; t-shirt. Napipitok tun kamahhita te nag-a nah payo. This t-shirt is muddy because it fell into the ricefield. gen: bulwati. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear a t-shirt. Handidan aammod taku ya adida mungkamihhita. Those forefathers of ours did not wear T-shirts. muN‑/nuN‑. Language Of Borrowing: Spanish: camasita.

kamison 1comm. a chemise; a slip, full or half body. E gimmatang hi kamison na. She went to buy herself a chemise. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear a chemise. Hay da binabai di mungkamison. It is the women who wear a chemise. muN‑/nuN‑. Language Of Borrowing: Spanish: camison.

kango comm. 1hornbill bird, makes the sound kalao, kalao at 5:00 pm, known as the forest clock. Maid da moy kango ad Kiangan. There are no more kango-birds in Kiangan. Sim: dungdung. (sem. domains: 1.6.1.2 - Bird.) 2male headdress like a hornbill. [The headdress is a simulated skull and beak of the hornbill bird and decorated with feathers, beads and cotton; worn during the tobab dance at the end of the uya-uy feast.] Gen: gamgam. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

kasinsilyu (sp. var. katintilyu) 1comm. undershorts; underpants E gimmatang hi kasinsilyun nan inbabale na. She went to buy undershorts for her son. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear undershorts. Mungkasinsilyo ka eno. You wear your undershorts, okay? muN‑/nuN‑. Language Of Borrowing: Ilocano.

kolbata 1comm. necktie. Dakol di kolbatam. You have many neckties. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear a necktie. Mungkolbata day mungngunuh opisina. Office workers wear neckties. muN‑/nuN‑. Language Of Borrowing: Spanish: corbata.

kusu trans. to wrinkle or rumple clothing. Kusuwon nadan u-unga nadan bulwati nah ubunan. The children will rumple the clothes on the chair. Kinusu da nan napalenhan pantalon. They rumpled the ironed pants. Nakusu tun bulwatik te inhuyop ku. My clothes are rumbled because I slept in them. ‑on/‑in‑, ma‑/na‑. 4A Change the structure of object. (sem. domains: 8.3.2 - Texture, 5.3 - Clothing.) Language Of Borrowing: Ilocano.

lamma comm. the native-woven white sleeveless blouse. Teyay lammak ta ilammam ni-an. Here is my blouse for you to use. Sim: almador. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

lampin 1comm. diaper. Em ihaad nan lampin nan golang. Go and put the diaper on the baby. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to put a diaper on a baby. Lampinam nan golang. Put a diaper on the baby. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an. 5A Changing state of site by adding something. (sem. domains: 7.5.9 - Put.)

layut₁ 1comm. rags; ragged clothing. Umidat ta keh bulwati nadah nawotwot ya bokon kay layut di idat. If you give clothes to the poor, don’t give rags. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear ragged clothes. Tipet eka munlaylayut? Why do you wear rags? muN‑/nuN‑. 3intrans. discarded ragged clothes. Idat mu nan nunlayutam. Give me your ragged clothes. (the ones you have already discarded.) nuN‑ ‑an.

lokob 1comm. cloth patch. Ha-adam hi lokob nah pukol nan kamahhitam. Place a patch on the shoulder of your shirt. Sim: tapal, takup. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to patch clothes. Lokobam nan nabik-in pantalon mu. Sew a patch on your torn pants. Ilkob mu nan nungkaanan da nah pantalon mu. Patch it with the cloth they cut off from your pants. Lingkobana nan bulwatina. She patched her dress. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, i‑/iN‑.

lubung₂ comm. clothing. Maphod nan lubung mu. Your dress is beautiful. Sim: bulwati. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) Language of Borrowing: Central Ifugao.

lupit comm. the hem or fold in a garment. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

luput comm. fabric woven from filaments of wool, cotton, etc.; cloth. Dakol di luput na an maphod. He has many good fabrics. Gumattang ka hi ohan yardan luput. Buy one yard of cloth. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

mayad 1comm. a woman’s belt, hand-woven with decorative pompoms; worn with a woven skirt. [This belt is sometimes used as a loin cloth for young boys.] In-wanon nan unga nan mayad inana. The boy used the woven belt of his mother for his loin cloth. Gen: balko. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to wear a woven belt. Mummayad ka hin manayo kayuh iskul. Wear a woven belt if you dance in school. muN‑/nuN‑.

oban 1comm. a cloth, shawl or blanket used for carrying children who are strapped on the back or chest area. Wada nan oban nah pikdol. The carrying-shawl is in the corner. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to carry a child with blanket. Obanan yu nan golang te uma-aliy hinuyop na. Carry the child in a blanket because he is very sleepy. In-obana nan bayyaung hi nangiobbaana nah golang. He used the bayyaung-blanket to carry the baby. Mun-oban kayu apum ta mahuyop ka mo. Your grandfather will carry you with a blanket and you will sleep. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, muN‑/nuN‑, i‑/iN‑. Sim: ulo. (sem. domains: 7.3.1 - Carry.) comp. palat di oban

palenha 1comm. a flatiron that burns charcoal, used for pressing clothing. 2trans. to iron clothes; to press with a flatiron. Palenhaom tun pantalon ku. Please iron my pants. Ipalenham nan bulwatina. Iron her clothes for her. Mumpalenha dah pumbulwati dah bigat. They are pressing clothes that they will wear tomorrow. Pumalenha kah duwan kamahhitan amam. Iron two shirts of your father. Mapalenha datuwen bulwati. These clothes are ready to be ironed. ‑on/‑in‑, i‑ ‑an/iN‑ ‑an, ‑um‑/‑imm‑, muN‑/nuN‑, ma‑/na‑. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) Language Of Borrowing: Spanish.

palpaldang (fr. var. paldang) comm. men’s ornamental belt. [This belt is worn only during special ceremonies.] Restrictions: rituals. Waday palpaldang da te immuyauy da. They have a men’s ornamental belt because they performed the prestige feast. Sim: ginuttu, gimbatan. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

pantalon 1comm. pants. Iusar mu nan balun pantalon mu hantu graduation yu. Use your new pants on your graduation day. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to wear pants. Mumpantalon ka hin umalikad nabagtu. Wear pants when you come to the town center. Ipantalon mu nan ka-gattang. Use the newly bought pants. Pantalonan yu nan golang te maktol. Have the child wear pants because he feels cold. muN‑/nuN‑, i/‑in‑‑, ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an.

panti 1comm. panty; female undergarment. Maingit di panti na. Her panty is red. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to wear a panty. Mumpanti ka te ongal ka mo. Wear a panty because you are already old. Pantiyam nan golang te pamga nah ubun nah luta. Have the child wear a panty because she just sits on the ground. muN‑/nuN‑, ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an. Language Of Borrowing: English.

panyuk 1comm. handkerchief. Pinhod kuy ambilbilog an panyuk. I like a wider handkerchief. Humong-ot kah panyuk mu. Blow your nose in your handkerchief. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to pocket a handkerchief. Mumpanyuk ka hin ume kad Lagawe te maka-atung hidi. Pocket a handerchief if you go to Lagawe because it is very hot there. muN‑. Language Of Borrowing: Spanish: panyu.

relip comm. refers to used clothing from relief missions. [Although relief missions ended long ago, used clothing is sold in markets and stores. Relatives working overseas often send cartons of such clothing.] Waday igattang dan relip hidih markadu. They have used clothing for sale in the market. (sem. domains: 4.4.4.7 - Relief, 5.3 - Clothing.) Language Of Borrowing: English: relief.

sapatus comm. shoes. Ongal tun ginattang mun sapatus. These shoes you bought are big. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) Language Of Borrowing: Spanish: zapato.

sinelas comm. footware that is held on by a thong or strap. Daanay sinelas ku? Where are my slippers? (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

suweter 1comm. a sweater. Duwa di suweter na. He has two sweaters. gen: bulwati. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear a sweater. Munsuweter ka tedeyan kotol. Wear a sweater because it is cold. muN‑nuN‑. 3trans. to place a sweater on someone. Suweteran yu tun golang tedeyan munggagayonggong hi kintol na. Have this child wear a sweater because he is shivering from the cold. Isuweter mu nan indat tulang mu. Wear the sweater given by your sister. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, i‑/iN‑. 5A Changing state of site by adding something. (sem. domains: 7.3.2 - Move something in a direction.) Language of Borrowing: English.

taddung 1comm. refers to any type of hat. Alam nan taddung te potang. Get the hat because it is hot. spec: helmet. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear a hat. Muntaddung ka tedeyan munhipuk. Wear a hat because it is drizzling. muN‑/nuN‑. 3trans. to place a hat on someone or use a particular hat. Itaddung mu nan kinapyan Matima. Use the hat made by Matima. Taddungam nan golang ta ahi kayu lumah-un. Put a hat on the child before you go out. i‑/iN‑, ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an. 5A Changing state of site by adding something.

talakid 1comm. a woven cane grass mat placed under the granary or used when the floor of the house is the earth. Waday talakid nah alang an damanan ubunan. There is a woven cane grass mat at the granary that can be sat on. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to weave with strips of liana vine; to make a reed mat called talgan. Talakidom nadan paul ta kapyaon takun kultina. Weave the cane grass sticks so that we will use it for a curtain. Tinalakid an paul di kahuyopan mi. We slept on a reed mat. ‑on/‑in‑. 4F Adjacency/Adjoining actions. (sem. domains: 6.6.4.2 - Weaving baskets and mats.)

talapu (sp. var. trapu) comm. a rag cloth. Kinapyanan talapu nan kamahhita na. He made his T-shirt into a rag cloth. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) Language Of Borrowing: Spanish: trapo.

tapis comm. the generic term for handwoven skirts. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

tinelat 1comm. slippers; flip-flops; rubber sandal. Kaanom nah tinelat mu te napipitok. Remove your slippers because they are very muddy. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2v. to wear rubber slippers. Muntinelat ka te dakol di palunggu nah dalan. You wear slippers because there are many broken bottles along the way. Itinelat mu nan ginattang dad Lagawe. Use the slippers they bought in Lagawe. Tinelatam nan golang ta ahi kayu mun-ay-ayyam. Have the child wear slippers before you go out to play. muN‑/nuN‑, i‑/iN‑, ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an. Language Of Borrowing: Spanish: chinelas.

tinonwe (infl. of tonwe) comm. a small g-string; a loincloth. Sim: binuhlan. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

tonwe comm. a loin cloth type, around six inches wide but very long. [This type of loin cloth is used during the uya-uy prestige ceremony and is needed for the death rituals of a person who performed the uya-uy-ceremony.] (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) infl. tinonwe

wano 1comm. a loincloth; a g-string. [The loincloth is still worn for special ceremonies.] In-abol nay wanon nan inayana. She wove the loincloth of her husband. Gen: gamgam; spec: binuhlan. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear a loincloth. O-oha moy matibon nunwano. Very few men wearing loincloths are seen now. Iwanom nan binanom ke Lomlom. Use the loincloth you borrowed from Lomlom. Wanowan yu hi Juan te manayo da nah iskul. Help Juan wear the loincloth because they are going to dance in school. muN‑/nuN‑, i‑/iN‑, ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an.