Search results for "Leave"

aga nangamung boh pidwana (id. of pidwana) idiom. Bye, until next time; Bye, see you again. Agat ume kami, nangamung boh pidwana. We are leaving, see you next time. This expression is used to politely break off a conversation. (sem. domains: 7.2.3.3 - Leave.)

bakwet trans. to leave one’s place; to abandon residence; to evacuate during war or epidemic. Numbakwet day iKiangan handih nangalian di Hapon. Long time ago the Kiangan people left their town because the Japanese came. Numbakweton da dadiyen tatagu te waday ipataddog di gubilnu na niha-adan da. The people were told to leave their place because the government was going to put up something where they were residing. muN‑/nuN‑, nuN‑ ‑on. 1B Movement with a directional component. Sim: dul’ig. (sem. domains: 7.2.3.3 - Leave, 4.3.3.3 - Abandon.) Language Of Borrowing: English: evacuate.

disaag 1intrans. to alight from vehicle; to get off a vehicle. Mundisaag taku hi bale. We will get off the vehicle at home. Dumisaag taku nah pottok di baleda. We will get off directly in front of their house. muN‑/nuN‑, ‑um‑/‑imm‑. (sem. domains: 7.2.3.3 - Leave.) 2trans. to unload from a vehicle, usually cargo. Idisaag mu tun kargak. Unload my cargo. i‑/iN‑.

og’a₂ trans. to start; to travel; to set off; to leave; to depart. Mungga dan umed Kiangan. They departed to go to Kiangan. An hi bigat di umgahan yu? Are you going to start tomorrow morning? (sem. domains: 7.2.3.3 - Leave.)