Search results for "ampuyo"

ampuyo 1comm. a native loom woven skirt. [Generally considered to be the type of skirt worn by the kadangyan ‘aristocratic’ class of women.] Antikkey ampuyo na. Her skirt is short. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, inabol, intinlu, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. donning the skirt 2.1deriv V. to wear the native, loom-woven skirt. Ya pinhod ot Mayor an dakol day binabain mun-ampuyo. What the Mayor wanted was that women would dress in the Ifugao skirt. muN‑/nuN‑. (sem. domains: 5.3.7 - Wear clothing.) 2.2deriv V. to dress someone in the native skirt. Ampuyowan yuh tulang yu. Dress your sister in the Ifugao skirt. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an.

Amlag 1prop. a ritual, something is offered to the spirit of a dead relative. (sem. domains: 4.3.9.1 - Custom.) 2intrans. to gather clothing and other things such as ampuyo ‘skirt’, attake ‘necklace’ balko ‘belt’, coins and place them in a winnowing basket, ligau. They are then offered to a dead relative for appeasement. Mun-amlag da te mundogoh inada. They are performing the Amlag-ritual because their mother is sick. muN‑/nuN‑.

dinabol comm. a type of woman’s skirt; another name for the gamit skirt. Sim: gam’it, inabol, ampuyo, intinlu, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

gam’it 1comm. a native loom-woven skirt, red and black striped. [One type of woven skirt worn by women of wealth.] Hay iusal nadan mumpalaya an pepensiyonados ya gamit. The old folks who are receiving pensions will have a parade and will wear gamit-skirts. Sim: dinabol, inabol, ampuyo, intinlu, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to wear the native skirt. Munggamit da nadan manayon u-unga. The children who will dance the native dance will wear the gamit-skirt. muN‑/nuN‑.

ginaletget comm. a native loom-woven skirt. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, inabol, ampuyo, intinlu, ginalit. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

ginalit comm. a native loom-woven skirt. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, inabol, ampuyo, intinlu, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

inabol comm. a native loom-woven skirt. Maphod nan inabol Matima. The skirt of Matima looks nice. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, ampuyo, intinlu, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

intinlu comm. a native loom-woven skirt; 3-piece skirt joined by black and red thread, one weave cut into three and sewn to make one. [This skirt is generally worn by the poor. ] Gimmatang hi intinlu te uggena inilan mun-abol. She bought a intinlu-skirt because she doesn’t know how to weave. Sim: dinabol, gam’it, inabol, ampuyo, ginalit, ginaletget. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) (Lourdes S. Dulawan: Ifugao Culture and History)

‑in‑₂ num. this infix encodes plural for the noun roots meaning woman, babai, and man, lalaki, and some cardinal numbers. Ya pinhod ot Mayor an dakol day binabain mun-ampuyo What the Mayor wanted was many women dressed in the Ifugao skirt. (sem. domains: 9.2.9.2 - Noun affixes.)

abol 1comm. the native loom-woven skirt. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2weave. 2.1intrans. to weave on a hand loom. Mun-abol hi apu. Grandmother is weaving/weaves. muN‑/nuN‑. (sem. domains: 6.6.1.4 - Weaving cloth.) 2.2trans. to weave a particular product on a loom. Nganney iabol mu ad uwani? What will you weave with now? (referring to the thread which is to be used) Wano nan in-abol ku ad nakugab. A loincloth is what I wove yesterday. An maphod di pun-abol nah ampuyo? Does she weave skirts well? i‑/iN‑, puN‑. Class 3C Move, combine or attach object. (sem. domains: 6.6.1 - Working with cloth.) 2.3trans. to weave with a site-object cross-referenced by affix. Abolan dakah ampuyo. I will weave a skirt for you. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an.

am-in adj. all; referring to people, i.e. everyone, or things, i.e. everything. Makakkaphodan am-in di matiboh tu. Everything that is seen here is beautiful. Am-in on ipabahul nan ha-oy. He blames me for everything. Nun-ampuyo kamin am-in an binabai. All of us women wore the Ifugao skirt. Number quantifier. (sem. domains: 8.1.6 - Whole, complete, 8.1.5 - All.)

an₁ lk. 1this form links a main clause and a complement clause. Naka-ang-ang ku an pungkiting daka. I actually saw that you were being pinched. Tinuttuduwanak an kumalih kali da. They taught me how to speak their language. Katatakut pay an e buma-el na kalata. It is very dangerous to cross the street. 2this form links a relative clause to noun and verb heads. Handih 25th di Aplil kinalin Mayor an umali kanu da Apu Paredes ke Apu Datumanong hitu ad Ifugao. On the 25th of April, the Mayor said, it is reported, that Mr. Paredes and Mr. Datumanong would come here to Ifugao. 3this form links quantifiers and adjectives to noun heads. <Morphophonology: When the preceding word ends in a vowel, the vowel of the linker is reduced and the n attaches to the word.> Nun-ampuyo kamin am-in an binabai. We, all of us women, wore the Ifugao-skirt. comp. deya ot an

ay-aya sta. to be appropriate, refers to clothes that fit just right in size, length, appearance. Naka-ay-ayay ampuyon Bugan. Bugan’s skirt was just right for her. {literary} na‑. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

balko 1comm. belt, may refer to anything which cinches the waist of a woman; may also refer to the traditional woven belt. Nan balkon inam di usalom. Use your mother's native decorative belt. Gen: gamgam. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2intrans. to wear belt. Mumbalko ka ta adi mag-a nan ampuyom. You use your woven belt so that your skirt will not fall off. Balkowan yu nadan ampuyo yu. Wear the native decorative belt with your skirts. muN‑/nuN‑, ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, i‑/iN‑. Spec: mayad.

bilat comm. a needle; traditionally rice straws and slivers of bamboo were made into needles. Ha-adam hi tinulid nan bilat ta ikugut yu tun nabik-in luput. You thread the needle and sew this torn cloth. Banhok di bilat mu ta kugutak tun ampuyok. May I borrow your needle so that I can sew my skirt. Naligat an humgop di sinulid nah ittay an bilat te ittay di uwang na. It’s hard for a thread to enter a small needle because it has a tiny hole. Adi pamga haad hi bilat te mittuwik. We should not just put needles anywhere because they prick. Tutuwikon, hidhid-ipon. (bilat) You prick while you peep. (needle)(riddle) (sem. domains: 6.7 - Tool.)

binabai (infl. of babai) comm. the plural form of woman/female. Nun-ampuyo kamin am-in an binabai. All of us women wore the Ifugao skirt. Adim ilagat nadan binabai. Do not involve the women. ‑in‑. (sem. domains: 2 - Person.)

da-it₂ trans. 1to add something to what is already existing. Adim ida-it nan bale yu nah bale da. Do not join your house to their house. i‑/iN‑. 3A Move and position object . (sem. domains: 7.3.2 - Move something in a direction.) 2to sew; to add a piece of cloth to another. Da-itam nan ampuyom te neyan antikke. Sew a piece to your skirt because it is short. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an. Language of Borrowing: Keley-i Kallahan.

dondon₂ trans. to put things close together; e.g. weaving thread; to bring things together. Dondonom nan kapyaom an ampuyo. Make the native skirt’s threads close together. ‑on/‑in‑. Sim: dattum, dummit. (sem. domains: 7.5 - Arrange.)

gulit comm. stripe; stripe designs on cloth. Makakkaphod di gulit di ampuyom. Your skirt has beautiful designs. (sem. domains: 8.3.1.8 - Pattern, design.)

habak comm. a design in a woven garment. Banniyay habak nah ampuyo na. A forest-lizard is the design at the edge of her skirt. (sem. domains: 8.3.5.4 - Pattern, model.)

hangngal trans. to mend by rejoining torn edges of clothing. Hangngalona nan ampuyona te nabik-i. She will join the ends of her skirt because it is torn. Munhangngal hi ampuyo. She is joining the ends of her skirt. ‑on/‑in‑, muN‑/nuN‑. 4A Change the structure of an object. (sem. domains: 7.5.2 - Join, attach.) der. hinangngal

hethet (sp. var. hathat) 1comm. a torn part of clothing. Neyan mungkaongal di hethet nan ampuyom. There, the torn part of yout skirt is getting bigger. Sim: bik-i, pinga. 2trans. tear from one end to another; rip off cloth; the tearing sound of cloth being rent. Hetheton yu nan balimbing na. Rip off the edge of the blanket. Tipe ta em hetheton? Why do you tear it? Nahathat nan pantalon na handi pimmaytuk. His pants were torn when he jumped. ‑on/‑in‑, ma‑/na‑. Class 4A Change structure of object. (sem. domains: 7.8.4 - Tear, rip.)

hinangngal (der. of hangngal) comm. the panels of a native skirt. In-ampuyona nan hinangngal. She used the paneled-skirt. ‑on/‑in‑. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.)

holdak 1comm. inserted designs on clothing. Makaphod di holdak nan ampuyom. The inserted designs in your skirt are nice. (sem. domains: 5.3 - Clothing.) 2trans. to insert something into another thing or place between other things. Holdakan yuh kanta nan drama. Insert some songs in the drama. (between acts) Holdakam hi maingit nan ulo. Insert some red designs in the blanket. Iholdak muy ngadan ku nah listaan. Insert my name on the list. Holdakam hi banniya nan bulwatik. Insert a forest lizard design on my dress. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, i‑/iN‑. 3A Move and position object at site. (sem. domains: 7.5.9 - Put.) 3trans. to partition a room or space; to divide into smaller rooms; to place a divider. Holdakom tun kuwartu tedeyan ambiambilog. Insert a divider in this room because it’s very spacious. ‑on/‑in‑. (sem. domains: 7.3.2 - Move something in a direction.)

kami pers. we exclusive; first person, plural, exclusive pronoun; member of Set 2 subject; cross-referenced by verbal affix. Maid kami hidi handi hilong. We were not there last night. Nun-ampuyo kamin am-in an binabai. All of us women wore the Ifugao skirt. Maphod te immaliy dakol hi lugan ot ume kami. Luckily there were many rides so that we could go. (sem. domains: 9.2.3 - Pronouns.)
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