Search results for "gattin"

gattin (sp. var. gatin) 1trans. to step on something. Inggattina on ulog. He stepped on a snake. Handi ek igattin ya kimmol-owak te innang an eyak mag-a. When I tried to step down I became frightened because I almost fell. Inhamahamad kuy pangikawotak ya pangigattinak. I carefully chose strong branches to hold and step on. i‑/iN‑, pangi‑ ‑an. 3G Move body parts directionally. (sem. domains: 7.2.1 - Manner of movement.) 2comm. imprint of the foot. Ongal di gattin nan nangidalan nah banong. The footprints of the one who passed on the dike are big. 3trans. to step on something; the object being stepped on is cross-referenced. Gattinan yu nan udun di kaiw ta adi mahwit. Step on the end of the wood so it will not overturn. Inhamahamad kuy pangikawotak ya pangigattinak. I carefully choose strong branches to hold and step on. ‑an/‑in‑ ‑an, pangi‑ ‑an. id. namahig an kadangyan ke bo ya igatgattin dita.

namahig an kadangyan ke bo ya igatgattin dita. (id. of gattin) an idiom expressing that rich people are snobs; the rich treat others contemptuously (lit. the rich are always stepping on us).

dakdak trans. to feel with feet for secure footing when crossing a river or stream. Maphod di dakdakon nan gattinon ahita immagwat. It is good to feel for stepping places as you cross (a river). ‑on/‑in‑. 4B Tactile - Touch contact. (sem. domains: 2.3.5 - Sense of touch.)

dampillak (sp. var. dampillag) 1trans. to flatten an object. Dampillakon yu nadan namukkol. Flatten the round ones. Dumampillak ka nadah lata. Flatten some of the tin cans. Idampillak mu nah talutu. Flatten it on the log. ‑on/‑in‑, i‑/iN‑, ‑um‑/‑imm‑. 4A Change the structure of object. Sim: damek. (sem. domains: 7.7.4 - Press.) 2pass. the state of being flat. Nadampillak nan olong na. His nose is flat. Igattin mu nan lata ta madampillak. Step on the can so that it will be flattened. ma‑/na‑. (sem. domains: 8.3.2.2 - Rough.)

hablut trans. to catch an animal in a rope trap. Hinnatkon di aton dan manablut hi babuy te ipalat da nan linubid ta ih-od nah gattinon nan babuy ne deke ingguyud da nan linubid ten nahablut ta dopapon da mot bobodan day hukina. They have a different way of catching pigs using ropes because they make a loop and put it at the end of a stick and lay it on the path of a pig, then they pull the rope when the pig has been caught and they catch him and tie his legs. maN‑/naN‑, ma‑/na‑. (sem. domains: 6.4.2 - Trap.)

hamad 1advpred. to stabilize by fastening or attaching firmly, permanently, securely; describes structures or ties, but may be extended to abstract ideas such as belief, love, etc. Ihamad mun igakod ta adi maubad. Tie it firmly so that it will not become loose. Inhamahamad kuy pangikawotak ya pangigattinak. I carefully chose strong branches to hold and step on. Umala da nan tataguh andukken hapang ta ihamad dan igakod nan hagabih di. The men in the forest look for a sturdy branch so they can securely tie the hagabi-bench. i‑/iN‑. Manner. (sem. domains: 7.5.2 - Join, attach.) 2trans. (fig) extended meaning for non-concrete entities; strengthen. Inhamad da mon mundasal ke hiya. They strengthened their praying for him. i‑/iN‑. infl. nahamad

huki comm. refers to the leg or foot or both foot and leg. Inggattinay hukik. He stepped on my foot. Hay nunggibok na ya kay waday nangipudon hi hukina ot adina ipae, kinali adi pakataddog. He felt like someone grabbed both of his legs and refused to let go, so he couldn’t stand. Nungkaladladan di aadol na ya linumbag di huhuki na. He had bruises all over his body and his feet were swollen. (sem. domains: 2.1.3.2 - Leg.)