Yakan - English


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ngāmag
adjShining (like eyes, lamp); phosphorescent (as eyes of cats in the dark, and of some snakes); luminous.shine; phosphorescent; luminousThere is a phosphorescent fungus called lamag. Possibly ngāmag is a frozen form originating from nga- plus lamag.Ngāmag matanen.His eyes are luminous.Payamanun be lelipanin, ngāmg bang dem kalindeman.Look at the centipede; it is phosphorescent in the dark.Hatugaˈpesiyetuli, īˈpengāmag peyitaˈanden.Perhaps they are not yet asleep; their lamp is still shining.Delos iyan ngāmag bang sangem.That watch is luminous at night.killap
ngāpekāpe
vTo wake up from sleep, awake.
nga-
affTo become...Affix with adjectives and stative verbs.Ngatahakne manggahin.The mangoes are becoming ripe now.Ngalanes dawenin.The leaves are withering (lit. becoming withered).
ngambesngombes
adjWatery, almost rotten (of camote and cassava).
ngase
vsubjectmag-objectpag-#-anTo anticipate, see coming, foresee (s.t. bad happening).It is only said in retrospect. It can be used of fields, the body, a house, people, etc. if it is or becomes better, yields much etc. and then something bad happens, it is destroyed or the owner dies.anticipate (destruction); forsee s.t. (bad)Manjari manamal tanaˈkun peggeˈ niyaˈ pagngasehanne.My field has yielded much because it was anticipating something (e.g. the death of its owner, that it might burn, etc.).Hangkan du hāp lumaˈ miyaˈan peggeˈ magngase.That’s why that house is nice, because it anticipates (destruction).Tinalewkubang ngahāp barannen kaw niyaˈ pagngasehanne.I am afraid if his body becomes better; perhaps it is foreseeing (destruction).ase-ase
ngasi
adjTo be effective (of supernatural knowledge and power, or medicine).effective, of supernatural power and medicineNgasi elimuˈnen si iye, hangkan hep iye gaˈ katamaˈan.His supernatural knowledge was effective for him; therefore he was not wounded.Gaˈngasitambalpeddiˈ bettengnen peggeˈ gaˈ du tahalaˈ peddiˈnen.The medicine for his stomachache was not effective because his pain did not go away.14.19Adjectives used in connection w/ religionAdjectives used in connection w/ religion12.12Adjectives and verbs used in connection w/ sicknessAdjectives and verbs used in connection w/ sickness
ngatigkatig2
vFor rice to produce many stalks (out of the original root stock).
ngayuˈ-ngayuˈkayuˈ 2
adjTo be countable, be decimated, having become few, reduced in number (so as to (almost) be countable).
ngēbba
conjIf...then, because (this condition ... that result).if...then; because (this condition ... that result)Always followed by sudda, taka-taka, ujudnen.Ngēbbaluwaltennunsudda ubus tennunnen.If she always weaves then eventually her weaving will be finished.Ngēbbakew iyan magpanaˈikan sudda laboˈ kew iyan.If you always climb ((bthen) you will eventually fall.sangatbang
ngēsngēs
vmagngēsngēsFor s.t. to make a hissing or grating sound.hissing sound, to make; grating sound, to makeNiyaˈ kopang diyalem lahing iyan, iyuˈ niyaˈ magngēsngēs.There is a coconut borer in that coconut tree; there is something hissing.Paˈignas bettis jīpin diyataˈ dindingne, iyuˈ magngēsngēs.The tire of the jeep is rubbing against the side; it makes a grating sound.28SOUNDSSOUNDS
ngeggilkeggil
vTo be dried out, very dry, desiccated.
ngehemehem
vTo clear one’s throat, to “hem”.
ngekegkekeg
vTo tremble, shiver.
ngekkeˈ
vTo shrink (of cloth).shrunk; shrinkDaˈa pepīhun badjuˈkun dem boheˈ duk gaˈi ngekkeˈ.Don’t put my blouse into water so it won’t shrink.23.6Verbs and adjectives used in connection w/ sewing and dressingVerbs and adjectives used in connection w/ sewing and dressing
ngengngeng
vmagngengngengTo make a whining sound (as of a mosquito).whining sound, to makeDaˈakewmagngengngeng.Don’t whine.Kēmmut iyan luwal magngengngeng si bihing teyingeku.That mosquito is always whining next to my ear.
vkangengngeng-ngengngenganConstantly whining (of many children or mosquitos).Weˈeymākanak iyan kangengngeng-ngengngengan.Why are those children always whining?28SOUNDSSOUNDS
ngengngusengngus
vTo sniff up s.t. as when having a cold.
ngeregseˈ
conjUntil, up to (and including a certain time).until; up to and including a certain timeGeyku pahali māku ngeregseˈ gey ku kaˈurungan.I am not stopping to ask until I have been given it.Gaˈpeiyetekkangeregseˈkuweˈitu.Up to now he has not yet come.sampaysamantaˈantaman
ngessitessit
vTo hiss; say ‘sss’ (usually in order to get someone’s attention).
ngettep dellaˈ
adjTo be lisping, to be indistinct (of speech).It sounds as if there is too much tongue in the mouth, or if the tongue is being bitten.lisping; indistinct (of speech)Bangmissādende iyan ngettep dellaˈne.When that woman speaks she lisps.pengngaksubetengngeˈ
ngeyopokngelopoklopok
vTo crackle; creak (sound of s.t. brittle being chewed or moved).
ngindāng
vTo warm (oneself at the fireside).warm oneself at firekewngindāngbangkewhaggutan.Go and warm yourself (at the fire) if you are cold.Mekellum kew ebbut duk niyaˈ pangindānganne.Light a fire so that he has something to warm himself.
ngingking
adjTo be curled up (because of heat, cold and/or dryness).Mostly used of plants but also of dried fish etc.curled upNgingking meˈ dawen batadin peggeˈ panas ellewin.The leaves of the corn are curled up because of the hot sun.Ngingkingnakanak iyan weˈ haggutin.That child is curled up because of the cold.Tinataˈan weˈ ku boheˈ panas oletin, magtawus ngingking.I poured hot water on the grub; immediately it curled up.Bang palastikin tapit si ebbut ngingking.When plastic comes close to a fire it curls up.kongkong18.3Adjectives and verbs used in connection w/ plantsAdjectives and verbs used in connection w/ plants
ngisem
adjAlmost ripe (of some fruits such as marang, jackfruit, guavano, balunu).It is somewhat sweet but not yet quite soft.ripe, almost (of some fruits)Ngisemne meˈ marangin.The marang are almost ripe.Kangisem-ngisemannehadja marangin.The marang are only just a bit ripe.buwaˈ1.15Stages of development of plants and fruitStages of development of plants and fruit
ngombesngambes
adjWatery, almost rotten (of camote and cassava).The middle is soft, has holes and water. Camote in this stage are good to be eaten raw, but not when cooked. Cassava is not very good to eat in this stage.watery (of camote and cassava)Geynehāpkinakankemuntiˈinintiyaˈnengombes.This sweet potato is no longer good to eat; it is watery.Lemmaˈne iliˈis kemuntiˈ kayu inin tiyaˈ ne ngombes.This cassava is too soft to grate; it is watery already.kelot
ngonyelkonyel
vTo squirm, wriggle (move the body like a worm).

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